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View Poll Results: How little $$$ is a good deal?

Voters
62. You may not vote on this poll
  • $500-1,500

    2 3.23%
  • $1,501-5,000

    18 29.03%
  • $5,001-10,000

    26 41.94%
  • $10,001-$15,000

    16 25.81%
  • Who needs deals? I have a trust fund!

    0 0%
Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2001
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    Purcellville, VA
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    5,951

    Default Where do you define "good deal" on well bred horses?

    There a few threads around with discussions around good deals on young, upper level prospects. I have noticed that well-bred, nicely conformed youngsters seem to start at 5000 and like anything, the sky is the limit.

    What is your "good deal" limit?

    ETA: For the sake of this poll, let's say you want an FEI prospect (so to PSG at the minimum).



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2007
    Location
    Gettysburg, PA
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    2,661

    Default

    That will also depend if you limit your criteria to WBs or if you are looking at others. I bred my Irish mare to an Irish Draught stallion at I1 and long listed for the Candian team for a dressage prospect and am breeding her to a Rosenthal son for an Irish Draught sport horse dressage prospect. There are others like a GRP, fresian sport horses etc that are being bred with the goal of producing upper level prospects that don't normally command the prices of WB thus a deal price will depend
    Epona Farm
    Irish Draughts and Irish Draught Sport horses

    Join us on Facebook



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
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    16,079

    Default

    Cut out the middleman - buy direct.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Location
    Western South Dakota
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    2,679

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    Cut out the middleman - buy direct.
    Agree!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2004
    Location
    sc
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    638

    Default

    depending on the quality of the young horse, you could pay more than this and still be getting the deal of the century on a going 3 or 4 year old.....there are horses that will eventually do the fei tests, and there are serious fei horses......



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2001
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    Purcellville, VA
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    Default

    I am not sure what the middleman, his existence or lack there of, has to do with what different people consider a good deal.

    If the average dressage-prospect-shopper's trainer thinks that a 20,000 two year old is a great deal, but the average AA with non Olympic showing goals needs to stay under 10,000 you have a pretty big difference.

    I am not talking about the Totilas or Lemony's Nicketts, but the nice horses that average people will be able to ride.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
    Posts
    8,701

    Default

    I don't know what you mean by "young"? The price for me is very different depending on if it's a weanling vs 2 year old vs 3 year old. My price for a good deal (in the same order) would be less than 5k, 5-10k, 10-15k.



  8. #8

    Default

    I'm assuming we are talking about purchasing a warmblood/warmblood X weanling given the categories.

    If you factor in the price of the stud fee ($1500-2000), cost of veterinary services (breeding - fresh vs frozen, progesterone supplementation, vaccinations, repeated ultrasounds, $1000-2000), mare maintenance (stall bedding, farrier, worming, $800-1200) and feed (depending on the region of country and including pasture maintenance, grain, hay, $3500-5000). So, on the low end we talking the cost of producing a quality foal at $6800 and the high end around $10,200 without any labor costs, advertising or unforeseen events.

    Seems to me any figure below $7000 is the "going out of business" price.

    http://www.mares-nest-farm.com



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 11, 2001
    Location
    Pennsylvania,Zone ll
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    2,212

    Default

    Having bred and raised my own horses I can say that all of these prices are fire sale prices for anything over a year old. To find a well bred three year old for less than 25k is a gift. And worth every penny. The risk involved in breeding is substantial...and for every good specimin you raise, there is the less desirable one in the back pasture that absorbs any profit from a great sale!!! And while I agree with the poster who advised to "buy your own"....a knowledgable horseman may be a wise investment if you are not one!!!
    "Over the Hill?? What Hill, Where?? I don't remember any hill!!!" Favorite Tee Shirt



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
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    SE Ky
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    4,387

    Default

    For a weanling well bred great moving WB foal under 15K is good, under 10K is great! So I defined it as under 10K.

    Poll didn't specify age range.
    Sandy in Fla.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    CT
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    6,489

    Default

    I haven't shopped for anything less than a three year old- so that's what I can speak to. I'd consider anything under $25k for a 3/4 year old FEI prospect with age appropriate training to be a good deal.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 1, 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    10

    Default

    A Pro's horse and a horse that can be ridden by an Ammi at or close to FEI level and Stay Sound are two different creatures and comand different prices. There is also 100x more horses that can pull off a clean PSG test than can pull off a clean Grand Prix test. I1 is the breaking point for a I'd say 80% of all FEI horses.
    I have had a few Pro only PSG horses who had some joint issues. These are not that tough to find. You can find these guys for under $2500.00 As long as you have the ability to ride them and the knowledge to keep them up $2500.00 is a good price.
    A sound GP horse that an ammi can ride when it retires from GP at the international level and still be sound? $100k minimum. Never seen on the open market.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2000
    Posts
    12,195

    Default

    Since you stopped your price ranges at $15,000, I assumed you meant the price for a weanling.

    I paid $7500 (plus $1200 to get him down here from Canada) and I thought I got a very good deal. So I voted for $5k - $10k.

    I would be suspicious of a well bred weanling going for under $5k. Yes, I am sure they are out there, and there are valid reasons to price one so low -- but I would certainly want to know what the reason was.
    I found the perfect distance but they put the jump in the wrong place.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2003
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    Hunterdon County, NJ
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    3,062

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Valentina_32926 View Post
    For a weanling well bred great moving WB foal under 15K is good, under 10K is great! So I defined it as under 10K.

    Poll didn't specify age range.
    Agreed!

    I'd also like to add that, although there are some risks, I think the younger the horse the more likely you are to find a really good one at a good price. In my experience, the super foals get snapped up by those who can recognize what they are. After that, they stay off the market, sometimes indefinitely, or, if they are offered for sale, it's often at a very significant price.
    Kendra
    Runningwater Warmbloods & Mare Station

    Home of SPS Diorella (Donnerhall/ Akut) and EM Raleska (Rascalino/ Warkant) 'Like' us on Facebook



  15. #15
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    Aug. 30, 2001
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    Default

    Yes, young ones. Mostly weanling-yearlings, but under 2.

    I should have added the caveat of "what is a good deal when it is YOUR money, as a buyer?"

    A lot of people seem to think a "good deal" is a lot more expensive when it is someone else's money.



  16. #16
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    Mar. 28, 2003
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    Hunterdon County, NJ
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SaddleFitterVA View Post
    Yes, young ones. Mostly weanling-yearlings, but under 2.

    I should have added the caveat of "what is a good deal when it is YOUR money, as a buyer?"

    A lot of people seem to think a "good deal" is a lot more expensive when it is someone else's money.
    Speaking for myself -- $10-$15k being good and under $10k being great reflects prices I've paid for weanlings.
    Kendra
    Runningwater Warmbloods & Mare Station

    Home of SPS Diorella (Donnerhall/ Akut) and EM Raleska (Rascalino/ Warkant) 'Like' us on Facebook



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2003
    Posts
    168

    Default

    There are so many different levels of quality that I don't think you can categorize them into one. Derid paints a very clear picture but leaves out one very important expense. The cost of the mare. We all know that it takes a great mare to have a great foal. Those cost lots of money. I turned down $60,000 for one of my broodmares as a four year old. That "value" has to be factored in to the foal price if one is to run a business like a business! Most youngsters these days are selling way under their true production cost, including mine. Maybe those great prices aren't going out of business prices yet, but they are certainly pointed in that direction. There are great deals out there to be had at all price levels. I hope U.S. breeders can make it through these tough times as we have come so far.



  18. #18
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    Aug. 30, 2001
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    Purcellville, VA
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    Default

    Darned work kept me away from coth all week.

    I think that everyone wants to get the most horse for the money spent, but I left out too many details because most buyers have a pretty constrained budget.

    They are the demand side of the equation.

    So, while the realities of production costs are interesting to note, I think that the supply side should note what the biggest pool of potential buyers are willing to spend.

    Everyone loves to tell the story of the six figure outliers, or high five figure young horses that a few wealthier than average people buy, but there are not so mAny of those who consider more than 15K a bargain for an untrained youngster.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2011
    Posts
    1,537

    Default

    I ride half-arab dressage horses so I get more horse for less money (FEI quality). It's not everyone's choice but I don't prefer WBs.

    I enjoy this type of horse and find they are easier to put on the bit while still having a big moving horse that offers collection.

    There aren't as many around that are suitable/bred for dressage but good deals are to be had for a great price.

    So I would be able to get a young arab x wb for less then 5k easily that had a lot of potential. I don't tend to buy young horses but they are out there.

    my current horse is 6 and bought already trained.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2007
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    Canada
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    Default

    Well, most horses can get through a PSG test with the right rider. Do you want a horse that is going to score 70 percent at PSG or a horse that can simply get through the test correctly? Ie how competative do you want to be?

    I could find lots of horses under ten k that might be able to make it to PSG but to find a truly competitive youngster (say two to three years old) with top gaits for under 35k ish is a good deal!

    Now, that being said, I know of one person who has trained probably more team horses than anyone else and I know that this person doesn't ever pay more than 20 k for a youngster. If you have a super duper eye and amazing feel clearly you don't need to spend a fortune to buy a superstar in the making.
    www.svhanoverians.com

    "Simple: Breeding,Training, Riding". Wolfram Wittig.



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