The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    12,751

    Default Slow feeders that can be used LOW in a stall?

    I have a horse in my care that unfortunately is on the Weight Watchers plan right now. I would love to have his owner get him a Nibble Net to help make his limited quantity of hay last longer between feedings, but he is a choke concern and we like to keep his hay on the ground, or at least low. I did a little googling tonight, and the only option I could readily find that wasn't also a huge monstrosity, requires massive amounts of construction or hole drilling, or just plain old look unsafe or cumbersome to use cost $500!!!! No thanks.

    Any ideas? I am a fan of Nibble Nets and have one for another horse, just not the safest for feeding low down.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    3,502

    Default

    I use a nag net for my stalled horses. My vet says it can be used loose in the stall as long as the horse does not have shoes. I opted to tie it up though, but just high enough so the bottom touches the ground. Again, this is only safe for horses that don't have shoes.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    12,751



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2010
    Posts
    679

    Default Natural feeder

    I heard from the manufacturer that the "Natural Feeder" people have a new stall sized unit. You might contact Julie.

    PKN



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    6,793

    Default

    Lucky you: I had some notes stored away from when I was considering this for my horse. We ended up using a Nibblenet until I could move barns, but...

    The Grazer, $170
    http://www.timcohorseandfarmsupply.c...eshipfree.aspx

    COTHer DMK built one that doesn't look like a construction nightmare:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/2459472...th/3177812117/

    I suspect you could rig this one up for a stall too. Scroll down to the one that's a plastic barrel with the top cut off, and inside there's a circular piece of wood with circular holes. IIRC that circular piece of wood is secured with a bungee so that it holds tight against the hay even as the hay decreases. You could probably find a way to hook that safely into a corner of a stall, or a stall wall.
    http://paddockparadise.wetpaint.com/...at%27s+Barrels
    ________________________
    Resident COTH saddle nerd. (CYA: Not a pro, just a long-time enthusiast!)
    http://twitter.com/jenlmichaels



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    Nibble Nets would work. I use one with a small pony border and even then the holes in it are too small for him to get hung up in.

    http://www.thinaircanvas.com/nibblen...lenetframe.htm

    Cinchchix would work also as long as he's not shod.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2011
    Posts
    904

    Default

    I would avoid anything with metal grates.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,532

    Default

    Since the horse is shod, I'd get a very small holed net from Cinch Chix and then put it inside a muck tub. Using double-ended snap clips, clip the net to the tub handles and, if necessary, drill holes in the edge of the tub to use more clips. This way he can eat slowly, head down and the net will collapse upon itself inside the tub as the hay is consumed.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- "When they try to tell you these are your Golden years, don't believe 'em.... It's rust."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,213

    Default

    I hang Nibblenets from my stall grates in front.... The mesh is quite low and I have not had any problems with them used in this fashion...don't know if that is low enough for you but it has been working well for us.

    If you are concerned about shoes getting caught, put up a baling twine loop (I make mine a few twines thick) and loop the handles through the twine, which is tied to whatever you are using to secure it. I hang all my slow feeders on twine and periodically one will be "down" when I go out to feed, with no effects on the horse.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    12,751

    Default

    I have a feeling this guy would never do anything that could cause him to get stuck...he is a VERY good boy and always has his feet firmly on the ground (too firmly...he's a foot shuffler in his stall!!). But, I still worry. I do think hanging the Nibble Net lower will work, and have used one lower in the past (not very low, but lower than the current one in my barn). Thanks for the suggestions. The metal one scares me a bit...too many pointy edges!!!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2006
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    5,490

    Default

    Seriously, I've seen a number of people use a large muckbucket - put the net in the muckbucket and tie it all down with bungees and secure the bucket to the stall with bungees. No reason it wouldn't work...

    Hope that helps.
    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 10, 2010
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    1,613

    Default

    I just ordered the bale-size CinchChix net and am going to put the whole netted bale inside one of my metal 100 gallon troughs that leaks.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,213

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AnotherRound View Post
    Seriously, I've seen a number of people use a large muckbucket - put the net in the muckbucket and tie it all down with bungees and secure the bucket to the stall with bungees. No reason it wouldn't work...

    Hope that helps.
    I am sure it works, but it sounds like a lot more effort than a Nibblenet -- a couple snaps and you can refill the NN in place.

    Here is one of my low ones last summer. A couple inches between ground and bottom of net. I have observed them (ad nauseum!) and they all seem to eat out of the middle-bottom with heads down, not the top. You can see a dent in the hay where they have been munching, about 1/3 to 1/2 way up the net. http://www.facebook.com/#!/photo.php...type=3&theater

    I now have a Cinchchix small bale net in this place stretched between the fenceposts and the NNs in my stalls hung about the same height as here. They still eat from it low down. I use the Cinchchix now outside so they always have hay in front of them in winter but like the NNs just as well, for a different purpose.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    12,751

    Default

    His owner and I have chatted, and we're going to go the route of a Nibble Net hung lower. As a BM, I REALLY like the NN, as it is very quick and easy to fill...it only takes me a bit more time to fill than it does to toss hay in the stall. I have a full, 18 stall barn, and I am the one responsible for their feeding, so would rather not have to deal with some major contraption, home made or otherwise. And I DO NOT want him in front of a bale of hay! This guy needs to diet, so I want to make his more limited hay quantity to last as long as possible.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2009
    Posts
    552

    Default

    Go to square meal feeds they have an excellent feeder you can mount anywhere.

    Keeps the flakes IN!!!!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2011
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by howardh View Post
    Go to square meal feeds they have an excellent feeder you can mount anywhere.

    Keeps the flakes IN!!!!
    http://www.squaremealfeeds.com/SquareMealFeeder.asp
    That thing looks scary dangerous for horses! OP was looking for something could be mounted low, and a horse could get its leg caught even if mounted high. Looks like it would be more appropriate for llamas, sheep, alpacas, or pigs than for horses.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2010
    Posts
    434

    Default

    I also wanted to figure out a way to use a larger small hole hay net feeder hung lower. I have a couple of small ones but I had bought a larger sort of bag that could hold a half bale and hangs by snaps. http://freedomfeeder.com/ The top long side opens up while the feeder remains hanging and you can fill it easily.

    Anyway, my 2 gelding are also shod so I was also worried about shoe heels catching in the net. It is pretty small diameter netting, similar to soccer nets so would probably just rip as the horse pulls back. Well it occured to me to make use of a spare rubbermaid water tank that was sitting around. I fastened the tank to a long wall in my double stall. The tanks have a couple of holes on each side that let me screw in a couple of screweyes. I put a couple of screweyes on the wall and use double-ended snaps to attach the tub to the wall. I then hung my hay net on the wall above the tub so it is half above the tub and half in the tub. The tub keeps the horses from pawing the net AND catches all the dropped hay so it stays clean and gets eaten. The net hangs pretty low and stays in place and I don't have to figure out a way of keeping it inside a tub. This has worked out really well. The double stall is bedded and used by the two as a run-in. They sleep in the stall regularly and the tub is smooth and safe for their legs. I could have been placed in a corner but with it on a long wall they share it better.

    No, I haven't come home and found a horse standing in the tub. Maybe because it's up against a wall, maybe because they really are smart enough to see no reason to stand in it. Naaaaahhh, that can't be it....

    chicamuxen



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov. 27, 2011
    Location
    My Little Bit of Heaven
    Posts
    233

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by yellowbritches View Post
    I have a horse in my care that unfortunately is on the Weight Watchers plan right now. I would love to have his owner get him a Nibble Net to help make his limited quantity of hay last longer between feedings, but he is a choke concern and we like to keep his hay on the ground, or at least low. I did a little googling tonight, and the only option I could readily find that wasn't also a huge monstrosity, requires massive amounts of construction or hole drilling, or just plain old look unsafe or cumbersome to use cost $500!!!! No thanks.

    Any ideas? I am a fan of Nibble Nets and have one for another horse, just not the safest for feeding low down.
    The small mesh hay nets are great for feeding at ground level, especially if you remove the string and put the loops onto a quick link (no carabiners as they can pinch) and hook that onto bale twine.

    The mesh is too small to get a foot through, the string has gone so no awkward tying and danger from that, and if the horse somehow manages to get hooked up (heel of a shoe?) then the bale twine will break.

    I've used this method to feed my barefoot horses for more than 2 years and they have never got caught in a net.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2007
    Location
    Southeast, PA.
    Posts
    208

    Default

    i have 3 small hole hay nets. Hang them low and the horses don't mind. Hang one off my gate. Never hand a problem. Just use baling twine as a safty in case obnoxious mare puts her foot through. Double ended snapas also breakaway in case. Works great, no mess on the gorund, and last for a long time. You don't need to buy anything expensive. I looked at the nibble nets and just adapted my 9.99 hay net.
    Memebr of Charlie Horse Riding Club.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2007
    Location
    Zone IV/Area III
    Posts
    1,210

    Default

    Use can use freedom feeders lower than other hay nets as long as they are used properly.

    A lot of people lace up the bale nets and put those on the ground, but I hang my extended day nets lower than a traditional net.

    I will say for safety purposes FF recommends hanging the bottom of the net at chest height, but if your horse is not a pawer, hanging it lower should be just fine. Especially since they now come with hanging safety clips between the net and the part you tie to the stall. That way if a hoof goes over, they will simply break the clip and hoof and net are a-okay.

    I have some pictures of the height that I hang my nets on my FF page on facebook.

    If you have any questions feel free to contact me on here or by email.



Similar Threads

  1. slow feeders for the more destructive type?
    By Hampton Bay in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Jan. 5, 2013, 08:48 AM
  2. Slow Feeders....
    By CDE Driver in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Oct. 6, 2012, 07:40 AM
  3. Using slow feeders in trailer mangers??
    By DangerHorse in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Apr. 3, 2012, 03:10 PM
  4. Slow feeders for stalls
    By KarenC in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: Jun. 23, 2011, 07:34 AM
  5. Slow hay feeders
    By Tamsin in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: May. 30, 2009, 07:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness