The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2006
    Posts
    2,528

    Default Opinions please regarding vet checks?

    I have a horse for sale and may be putting her in training for some fine turning. This horse is sound, has always been sound, yet given my luck with vet checks I am considering having a pre-vet check done do insure she is likely to pass flexions and such before I put more money into full trainning. This horse has alway been sound, jumped to 3.9 foot. What do you think, is it silly do consider a pre-vet check?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 30, 2010
    Location
    SE PA
    Posts
    458

    Default

    I wouldn't. As she is sound and healthy, I don't really see the point as she could go lame the following week anyway from a kick in the field or whatever.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2006
    Posts
    2,528

    Default

    It is just this horse has never been vetted before and I felt maybe doing flexion tests just to get an idea if she will pass a vet check before I continue to put lots of money into her training?

    how important are flexions if horse is working sound at desired level?



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 30, 2010
    Location
    SE PA
    Posts
    458

    Default

    Oh sorry, in that case then I would. I didn't realize (or missed it if you said) that the horse had never been flex tested.
    I think my PPE was in the $120-150 range, so it is worth doing before you invest more money.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    10,517

    Default

    A prepurchase exam is a snapshot of that horse at that hour of the day with no guarantee of future soundness. Your horse could pass a prepurchase today then you send it off to be tuned up and it could fail a prepurchase later for reasons X, Y & Z. However, doing a prepurchase (with xrays) before you put the horse on the market would give you proof down the road that there were no "fill in the blank" problems at the time you put the horse on the market.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2011
    Posts
    1,160

    Default

    I agree. My experience is also that many people ask about vetchecks before even bothering to come and look at the horse. A vetcheck with x-rays kind pf claryfies the healthsituatipn of the horse

    (although my personal opinion is that all this x-raying is only good for the vets.. Vertainly many horses were doomed bevause of x-ray findings... And i'm sure in many cases no x-rays might habe been better..
    But that is only my personal opinion, in General x-rays are a must for todays sales...
    And OP beliebe me, you will feel a lot more confident once you know the status of your horse ( especially if it is ok)

    Oh and I would choose a vet which is known to be tough on his judgements...



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 13, 2011
    Posts
    233

    Default

    Save your money as there is not a horse on the PLANET that can pass the flexion test in ALL FOUR LEGS.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2009
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HoofaSchmigetty View Post
    Save your money as there is not a horse on the PLANET that can pass the flexion test in ALL FOUR LEGS.
    The young mare that I just bought did. She had flexions performed by a good sports medicine/lameness vet and had no positive response in any of her four legs, proximal or distal. It is true that many horses, especially once they've had more of a "career" and more wear and tear, will have positive flexions that may or may not indicate a problem that will affect their ability to do their job, but blanket statements like the one above are just not accurate.

    OP, if your goal is to see if the mare has any potential issues that may show up on a vet check before you put her in training, it seems like a reasonable plan. However, if you're looking for a guarantee that she will pass the vet check when it comes time to sell, it won't help you there, as other posters have mentioned.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2006
    Posts
    2,528

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lizajane09 View Post
    The young mare that I just bought did. She had flexions performed by a good sports medicine/lameness vet and had no positive response in any of her four legs, proximal or distal. It is true that many horses, especially once they've had more of a "career" and more wear and tear, will have positive flexions that may or may not indicate a problem that will affect their ability to do their job, but blanket statements like the one above are just not accurate.

    OP, if your goal is to see if the mare has any potential issues that may show up on a vet check before you put her in training, it seems like a reasonable plan. However, if you're looking for a guarantee that she will pass the vet check when it comes time to sell, it won't help you there, as other posters have mentioned.
    My concern is putting out 1k plus a month into her training, I thought it might be nice to have an idea if she would pass the flexions. How fussy are buyers about flexions in a 10 year old working sound horse whom has been schooling 3'-3.3 courses foot in regular lessons and has jumped to 3.9 foot?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2009
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fharoah View Post
    My concern is putting out 1k plus a month into her training, I thought it might be nice to have an idea if she would pass the flexions. How fussy are buyers about flexions in a 10 year old working sound horse whom has been schooling 3'-3.3 courses foot in regular lessons and has jumped to 3.9 foot?
    For that, if it will make you more comfortable, I think it's a fine idea. It can give you an idea of where she is (today, at least) and help you decide how you want to proceed.

    As far as how buyers will feel about it... it will depend on the individual buyer, their comfort level, and what they plan to use the horse for. For me, personally, a mildly positive flexion in a horse as you described above would not be a dealbreaker. However, a severely positive flexion, especially if associated with a radiographic abnormality in that joint (degenerative joint disease, etc.), probably would be, depending on what I planned to do with the horse. Remember, the flexion tests are only one part of a pre-purchase exam, and ultimately it is the whole horse that will have to be taken into consideration!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 1, 2008
    Posts
    4,895

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HoofaSchmigetty View Post
    Save your money as there is not a horse on the PLANET that can pass the flexion test in ALL FOUR LEGS.
    Really? I've had many pass the flexion with flying colors.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2010
    Posts
    1,486

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HoofaSchmigetty View Post
    Save your money as there is not a horse on the PLANET that can pass the flexion test in ALL FOUR LEGS.
    If that was the case then find a different vet. They may be pulling the leg too hard. There is a science to doing flexions correctly.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2009
    Posts
    4,918

    Default

    I think if the basic vet check isn't going to run you hundreds of dollars, it might be worth it to do it so you have an idea.

    But, I think even if she does flex positive at all, its up to the person buying to decide if they can live with it or not. My horse is older (15 this year) and she flexed slightly positive in one of her hocks. Even for someone who would be using her for the same thing I am (she's supposed be my 3'-3'3" horse) it might have been a deal breaker. But I was okay with the fact she would probably need some extra maintenance.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2011
    Location
    Hypothermia Wisconsin
    Posts
    308

    Default

    i would do hoof tests and flexions. I wouldn't bother doing x-rays unless you are going to sell the horse in the 5-figure range and up. Buyers might be willing to look at the horse more because they wouldn't have to pay for xrays if the horse is on the more expensive side.

    You probably will spend $300-400 dollars on some external checks versus spending tons of money on training that isn't worth it.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2005
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,221

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by davistina67 View Post
    If that was the case then find a different vet. They may be pulling the leg too hard. There is a science to doing flexions correctly.
    Agreed. That's why I am VERY particular about who flexes my horses.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2009
    Posts
    673

    Default

    I did that on one in a situation just like you, and he passed it just fine. Went on about 6 months later to pass a full PPE.

    On the otherside, had a friend who bought an unstarted 2yr old did not do any sort of PPE before she bought him. He did 1st level dressage and was a fantastic easy 3' hunter. At age 10 she had to sell for financial reasons. He failed. He had at some point before she bought him BROKEN his knee! Who would have thought, he never had an off day in 7 years! He ended up going from lower mid 5 figures to 5k! Everyone just got so scared by that xray.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2006
    Posts
    2,528

    Default

    We are asking the 10-15k range hunter type.

    So if a working horse is mild to flexions (just as an example) would it be a candidate for seller or is it every buyer to there own?



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2010
    Location
    Hertford, NC
    Posts
    725

    Default

    my appy failed his vet check due to a bit of stiffness in a foreleg after flexing. I bougt him anyhow. He never showed any soreness in that leg.....ever! I had him for almost 20 years, though we rode for fun and on trails only.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2010
    Location
    Amsterdam, NY
    Posts
    309

    Default

    I work at yearling sales in the TB industry and it's common for sellers to have a PP exam including x-rays before the sale to show people who are interested. If a buyer is serious, they will usually have their own vet do another, but good x-rays can generate a lot of interest in an otherwise questionable horse.
    IF YOU THINK YOUR BRAIN IS NOT WORTH PROTECTING WITH A HELMET, YOU'RE PROBABLY RIGHT!

    Damrock Farm



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2006
    Posts
    2,528

    Default

    What would happen if mild changes showed on radiographs? If the vet referred to those as normal changes?



Similar Threads

  1. Favorite Ports For Checks
    By hey101 in forum Hunting
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Apr. 5, 2012, 02:25 PM
  2. Should Background Checks Be Done on New Boarders?
    By Mike Matson in forum Off Course
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Oct. 9, 2011, 09:48 PM
  3. Club foot and vet checks
    By Ozalynda in forum Endurance and Trail Riding
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: Dec. 12, 2010, 03:45 PM
  4. Vet checks for young horses
    By trail blazer in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Apr. 3, 2010, 06:35 PM
  5. How reliable are sex checks?
    By Hocus Focus in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Jun. 25, 2008, 01:04 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness