The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 13 of 14 FirstFirst ... 311121314 LastLast
Results 241 to 260 of 275
  1. #241
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2005
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    4,602

    Default

    Remember, this person writes so well she could be an English teacher (by her own admission). The posters are one in the same.
    SPAY/NEUTER/RESCUE/ADOPT!
    Little Star Chihuahua Rescue
    The Barkalicious Bakery
    On Facebook!!!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #242
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2007
    Location
    Huntington Beach, CA
    Posts
    1,290

    Default

    This may sound cynical, but just today, someone I know well has now put out her shingle as a "trainer." She has a fancy website stating all the things she can do. The problem is that she has no experience doing any of the things she says she can do. Her show record is basically non-existent and the only time she was a working student was when she was a teenager in high school and she worked one summer for a dressage trainer. She did go to college, but since finding a job in California has been a struggle, she is now a "trainer" and is getting clients. Granted these are not high paying clients with high dollar horses, but clients nonetheless. How long she will stay in business is anyone's guess, but it proves that even with no experience you can be a "trainer" and get clients. I anticipate the OP will probably be doing the same thing sooner then later.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #243
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2011
    Location
    Madison, GA
    Posts
    3,160

    Default

    Glad I checked in today.
    Southern Cross Guest Ranch
    An All Inclusive Guest Ranch Vacation - Georgia
    www.southcross.com
    RIP Bocephus March 2008 - April 2013


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #244
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2011
    Location
    Chicago Area
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Wow. Well, one thing, although I am still just a BarnMom-in-training, and don't have much to contribute by way of helpful advice or information, threads like these are ones I look forward to, because I feel like I learn so much.

    So whatever the deal is, I want to thank Emily and everyone who took the time to answer her. It has taken me the whole day off-and-on to read this thread carefully ... it is a world of instruction. I totally feel like I went to horse school today!
    Still Learning Something New Every Day !!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #245
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2011
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    2,341

    Default

    ChinUp whatsherface sounds different than the OP of this thread, if you ask me... Different writing styles, at least IMO. Although it is a rather odd coincidence, if you ask me.

    "You know how I feel about coincidences, Abby."
    "Yes, Gibbs, even equatorial pigmies know how you feel about coincidences."

    Trying a life outside of FEI tents and hotel rooms.



  6. #246
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    6,892

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GingerJumper View Post
    "You know how I feel about coincidences, Abby."
    "Yes, Gibbs, even equatorial pigmies know how you feel about coincidences."

    I love you for that.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  7. #247
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2007
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,042

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GingerJumper View Post

    "You know how I feel about coincidences, Abby."
    "Yes, Gibbs, even equatorial pigmies know how you feel about coincidences."

    That just made my year. Thank you
    Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine - Class of 2014

    Chance Encounter
    RIP Tall Tales



  8. #248
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2000
    Location
    Southern California - on a freeway someplace
    Posts
    9,994

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PonyPenny View Post
    This may sound cynical, but just today, someone I know well has now put out her shingle as a "trainer." She has a fancy website stating all the things she can do. The problem is that she has no experience doing any of the things she says she can do. Her show record is basically non-existent and the only time she was a working student was when she was a teenager in high school and she worked one summer for a dressage trainer.
    Could this be the person I am thinking of? The one who "forgot" to feed my horse lunch?
    The Evil Chem Prof



  9. #249

    Default

    I am begging for this thread to be over!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #250
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2007
    Location
    Huntington Beach, CA
    Posts
    1,290

    Default

    Yes Peggy, I am sure it is.



  11. #251
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    16,016

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alittlegray View Post
    DD is 13 and a pretty solid rider, and even though she has her foot in the barn door, she is working for every step she takes. We are paying good money for BNT instruction, and she still went every day last summer from 8-6 to spend the day working along with the other working students mucking, wrapping, washing, folding, grooming, hand walking, feeding, rolling bandages, packing trunks, turning out, etc. It was hard hard hard hard work under the hot Virginia summer sun. For FREE. Didn't involve a bit of riding any of the other horses in the barn, but she did it to be a better horsewoman. It's paying dues and learning ropes. While her friends were on vacation, she was cleaning stalls.

    What is my point for you, OP?

    No one is going to "hand you" anything. You need to take that grooming job even if there is no riding involved just to get your foot in the door and get experience. You need to pay more dues than you ever thought possible. Nothing is "too beneath" you. ...
    What you need to NOT do is have multiple personalities posting the same ranting threads about how you are better than other teens in the same position and should be given 'a chance' just because of that. Because honey, you aren't. There are 5 million teens who feel the exact same way and are willing to work just as hard. Keep it real, be humble, and be willing to do whatever it takes even if it is 'grooming with no chance of riding.'
    With all due respect for your DD's hard work, she and the OP here are *not* in the same position. Your DD has some BNT-quality instruction on- and off the horses. The OP appears not to. So your "taking the OP down a peg" by saying "honey, you aren't so special, there are other teens who work just as hard as you" is missing the point. The OP has to do *something* to get the opportunity to rub shoulders with more knowledgeable pros and learn from them. Your DD got that by virtue of your family giving her access to the BNT's barn. Her hard work pays off in a way that the OP's-- maybe just as diligent and long at her mom's place-- will not.... unless she moves up and out.

    Quote Originally Posted by ChinUpHeelsDown View Post
    Yikes! Now the stubborn mule in me just wants to prove you wrong. Any chance the mods would be willing to settle the petty dispute and check our IP addresses?
    Ah, one of the accused asked for an IP addy check. The witch hunt of even the most annoying tech-savvy, Janus-faced teens by some bored adults doesn't impress me. Mods, I think you should clear the name of ChinUpHeelsDown if she/he asks for it.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  12. #252
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    199

    Default Aspiring Riders Like Us

    Hi, Emily. You sound EXACTLY like me. In fact, you ARE me. I am in the same exact situation as you. I'm 17 years old, a junior in high school. I have wanted to be around horses and ride since I was a year old, my parents say. I did everything I could to be around horses until I finally took proper lessons at age 10. I quickly showed my instructor that I wanted to learn anything and everything possible. I owned my first horse at age 14 and began showing when I was 13. Local hunter shows, hunter paces, etc. Now I ride 4-6 days a week, multiple horses a day, work at another barn doing barn chores and mucking stalls 2 days a week, and I am loving it. I am now the girl that everyone at my show barn comes up to with their horse and pays me to ride them. I showed my first green OTTB to a Reserve Champion, and have a few others that I ride consistently. Just like you, however, I have NEVER in my life been on a "nice" horse. You are at least fortunate enough to have been on some very nice dressage horses. All the horses I have ridden have been problem horses, young ones, or pleasure. My family, nor I, have any money to spend on anything more than a local hunter show on a decent, hand made Appaloosa (my first horse, Cooper). I have never been to an "A" rated show (not even to watch), never been under the watchful eye of an BNT, or anything of that sort (however, I love my current trainer and she has taught me some valuable lessons). I work very hard every day to ride the horses that I get. I have learned from reading about famous riders such as Denny Emerson and Peter Leone, that you should ride ANY horse you can get your hands on. And, most importantly, to learn ALL aspects of this business, from cleaning stalls to mowing grass, to grooming and care. So I take pride in what I do at the moment. I know that I am learning.

    But, just like you, my ultimate dream, my goal, is to ride and compete at the highest levels...to work everyday on a farm where I can groom, train, teach, ANYTHING. And I plan to get there. I never like to leave on vacations with my family because I can't stand to not train for that long. I have never gone to one school dance in my high school life (which my parents aren't very thrilled about). I never go to sleepovers or to the mall, or hang out with friends. I am always with the horses so much that it drives my family crazy. I will be a senior in high school next year. I have to start getting my life together. And after some reflection (some daily reflection), I have decided that I am serious about my desire to go all the way in this industry. I am currently calling any BNT I can find, asking for a working student position because I believe, from lots of reading, that that is the best way to start. I have been to plenty of equestrian job websites. I am looking for a place where I can live in. I will move anywhere in the U.S to get my opportunity. I will MAKE my opportunity. And all the while, my parents, trainer and other top people have taught me that it is critical that I go to college and get some kind of a major. Know what else is similar about us? We both love English. I am in AP English right now in high school, and I plan to major in business and literature/english. And on top of all of that, I will have to find a way to make some money to support myself. I am advancing past the level of my first horse, Cooper, so I am selling him to make money for a car to transport myself. I will need gas money, food money, basic essentials- that's all I need. But I plan to make it work.

    So, after my long rant, just know that you are NOT ALONE. I understand you, girl. You and I are one of thousands that dream of this sport as a career. We are not that special. But we both have the drive, determination, and passion to push ourselves. I admire your confidence and passion. Like I said, you and me are extremely similar. One thing I have learned recently is that being humble and down-to-earth are SOOO important. I think young, aspiring riders like us tend to get so hard-headed, thinking we deserve everything right away. Not in ANY way am I saying that we act spoiled, or arrogant. There is a difference between arrogance and confidence. But, go in with too much confidence? It shines the wrong light on you. When you do get your opportunity to prove yourself, which I am pretty sure that you will, you need to show a calm confidence. You need to be humble, and realize that most big-timers have been in your shoes before, so they understand your situation. You are nothing unusual to them. Like I said, we are one of thousands. All you need to prove to anyone is that THIS is your passion, you have talent, and you will work hard on the skills that you need to improve. AND, most importantly, that you will never give up on it. Ever.

    I am only 17, so I don't know everything. In fact, I don't know much at all. Compared to most aspiring riders, I'm a nobody. So you don't have to listen to anything I just said. But I plan to do all I can to make my dream a reality. I wish you the best, Emily.



  13. #253
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2013
    Posts
    17

    Default

    This thread is a year old. (You might have missed the date I understand) It might be best not bring dramatic threads up from the past.



  14. #254
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    199

    Default

    Ok, I see now. Thanks.



  15. #255
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2011
    Location
    Co
    Posts
    5,011

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Horserider15 View Post
    Hi, Emily. You sound EXACTLY like me. In fact, you ARE me. I am in the same exact situation as you. I'm 17 years old, a junior in high school. I have wanted to be around horses and ride since I was a year old, my parents say. I did everything I could to be around horses until I finally took proper lessons at age 10. I quickly showed my instructor that I wanted to learn anything and everything possible. I owned my first horse at age 14 and began showing when I was 13. Local hunter shows, hunter paces, etc. Now I ride 4-6 days a week, multiple horses a day, work at another barn doing barn chores and mucking stalls 2 days a week, and I am loving it. I am now the girl that everyone at my show barn comes up to with their horse and pays me to ride them. I showed my first green OTTB to a Reserve Champion, and have a few others that I ride consistently. Just like you, however, I have NEVER in my life been on a "nice" horse. You are at least fortunate enough to have been on some very nice dressage horses. All the horses I have ridden have been problem horses, young ones, or pleasure. My family, nor I, have any money to spend on anything more than a local hunter show on a decent, hand made Appaloosa (my first horse, Cooper). I have never been to an "A" rated show (not even to watch), never been under the watchful eye of an BNT, or anything of that sort (however, I love my current trainer and she has taught me some valuable lessons). I work very hard every day to ride the horses that I get. I have learned from reading about famous riders such as Denny Emerson and Peter Leone, that you should ride ANY horse you can get your hands on. And, most importantly, to learn ALL aspects of this business, from cleaning stalls to mowing grass, to grooming and care. So I take pride in what I do at the moment. I know that I am learning.

    But, just like you, my ultimate dream, my goal, is to ride and compete at the highest levels...to work everyday on a farm where I can groom, train, teach, ANYTHING. And I plan to get there. I never like to leave on vacations with my family because I can't stand to not train for that long. I have never gone to one school dance in my high school life (which my parents aren't very thrilled about). I never go to sleepovers or to the mall, or hang out with friends. I am always with the horses so much that it drives my family crazy. I will be a senior in high school next year. I have to start getting my life together. And after some reflection (some daily reflection), I have decided that I am serious about my desire to go all the way in this industry. I am currently calling any BNT I can find, asking for a working student position because I believe, from lots of reading, that that is the best way to start. I have been to plenty of equestrian job websites. I am looking for a place where I can live in. I will move anywhere in the U.S to get my opportunity. I will MAKE my opportunity. And all the while, my parents, trainer and other top people have taught me that it is critical that I go to college and get some kind of a major. Know what else is similar about us? We both love English. I am in AP English right now in high school, and I plan to major in business and literature/english. And on top of all of that, I will have to find a way to make some money to support myself. I am advancing past the level of my first horse, Cooper, so I am selling him to make money for a car to transport myself. I will need gas money, food money, basic essentials- that's all I need. But I plan to make it work.

    So, after my long rant, just know that you are NOT ALONE. I understand you, girl. You and I are one of thousands that dream of this sport as a career. We are not that special. But we both have the drive, determination, and passion to push ourselves. I admire your confidence and passion. Like I said, you and me are extremely similar. One thing I have learned recently is that being humble and down-to-earth are SOOO important. I think young, aspiring riders like us tend to get so hard-headed, thinking we deserve everything right away. Not in ANY way am I saying that we act spoiled, or arrogant. There is a difference between arrogance and confidence. But, go in with too much confidence? It shines the wrong light on you. When you do get your opportunity to prove yourself, which I am pretty sure that you will, you need to show a calm confidence. You need to be humble, and realize that most big-timers have been in your shoes before, so they understand your situation. You are nothing unusual to them. Like I said, we are one of thousands. All you need to prove to anyone is that THIS is your passion, you have talent, and you will work hard on the skills that you need to improve. AND, most importantly, that you will never give up on it. Ever.

    I am only 17, so I don't know everything. In fact, I don't know much at all. Compared to most aspiring riders, I'm a nobody. So you don't have to listen to anything I just said. But I plan to do all I can to make my dream a reality. I wish you the best, Emily.
    Oh! Dear, not again? You write that this is your first post on this forum?

    I believe you when you write; "Hi Emily ,you sound exactly like me,in fact you ARE me"...
    Perhaps I am old and cynical, however, after reading the few posts in your greenie persona, I worry that one or all of the following might be true.

    1. I am becoming a jaded old person, or,

    2. Emily is coming back in the guise of another, or , that..

    3. There are an alarming number of young ladies of exactly the same age posting the same angst, repeatedly, in much the same manner.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  16. #256
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    199

    Default

    No, don't worry I'm not Emily. I understand what she's feeling, and I went on my rant to show her that. But at the end I stated that being humble is major in this sport. You need people to like you. That's something I understand better now, but something that this girl didn't get at all. That's my only reason for posting here. I'm not trying to start anything, I just wanted to voice my opinion, just like all of you did. I don't know Emily nor do I agree with her attitude at all. Sorry you feel that way.
    I didn't realize how old this thread was, and I shouldn't have brought it up. My bad.



  17. #257
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Location
    Ocala
    Posts
    1,381

    Default

    Really interesting thread. I think many of us were like the OP many many MANY years ago. Lots of posts here from youngsters who HAVE the right attitude to compete in the horse business. I dont think the OP is one of them.

    Just a quick point. Please please get an education so that you can support yourself if the horse jobs don't materialize. He takes only a second to fall off a horse and break a leg, get in a car accident and injure your back permanently, so riding is not an option anymore. Always have a Plan B to be able to support yourself.

    edited to add: sorry to add to this older thread, didnt catch the date.
    Last edited by halo; Feb. 1, 2013 at 08:27 AM.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #258
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    199

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by halo View Post
    Really interesting thread. I think many of us were like the OP many many MANY years ago. Lots of posts here from youngsters who HAVE the right attitude to compete in the horse business. I dont think the OP is one of them.

    Just a quick point. Please please get an education so that you can support yourself if the horse jobs don't materialize. He takes only a second to fall off a horse and break a leg, get in a car accident and injure your back permanently, so riding is not an option anymore. Always have a Plan B to be able to support yourself.

    edited to add: sorry to add to this older thread, didnt catch the date.
    Yeah, I apologize for adding to it in the first place. But thanks for you input, I am certainly going to go to college. And I appreciate your support, instead of the usual harsh critic. I agree, I know I'm young, but I'm sure most adults now in the business felt the same way and were as determined and us youngsters. So thank you.



  19. #259
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,756

    Default

    OP:

    My parents were poor. Yes, we were actually POOR. A family of 4 living on $25K a year. We free leased a barn down the road that we cleaned up and turned into a 6 stall barn and built xc jumps out of fallen trees, and our stadium jumps out of scrap. My father taught the local PC kids and everything we had we worked our butts off for. People would drop off problem horses or we would buy $100 horses from the auction or word of mouth. I was lucky in that my father could teach me to ride and jump. But our horses were not fancy or heck even safe at the start. BUT in a year or less we would have those horses and ponies jumping around 3'+ courses for XC and jumpers and off they would go. Not for much, but enough that we could get a couple more at times and go to a few shows a year. Really it is not that hard to get a horse jumping around a 3' course of jumps.

    We had nothing other then the horses. Now I didn't know we were poor, we had what we needed in our eyes.

    When I was 15 I left and did my first working student position as there was no way my family could afford to have me be able to take lessons from a BNT. I worked my butt off! 7 days a week. From 5am to 10pm. I learned a ton. I mucked. I groomed. It was grunt work and I learned more in those 5 months then I could have in years. I then was lucky to sell a horse for a larger sum then we could have ever dreamed of , $18k. I was lucky in that my father let me stick all of that money into a made horse that due to the US dollar being stronger then CN at the time I was able to afford. I was 17 at the time. I stayed in Canada to be a WS for the owner.

    I came back home to compete and was lucky to have my grandparents to help pay for shows. I was at that time working from 5am to 7pm training , teaching, and doing chores. I would then go work as a waitress at night.

    I eventually was a trainer at a few different places. Still grooming, teaching, training, mucking etc.

    Got injured. Got injured again. Got sick. Had to quit for 6 years. Built up a small buissness again. Now will be laid up for 8 weeks due to another surgery. Luckily am married and have my DH behind me all the way.

    And guess what? I may have paid my dues, done the hard work, competed heavy, resold well trained horses, BUT due to time off I am going to be having to pay my dues again since I have been out of the scene for to many years.

    So no matter what you are going to be grooming, busting your butt, and not always riding no matter what.

    If one of my students said they could groom at WEF and their parents were going to let them I would tell them to get off their butt and DO IT! Not only would they learn valuable tools for horse care but chances are they probably could have found a way to take lessons while they were down there too.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #260
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    199

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Couture TB View Post
    OP:

    My parents were poor. Yes, we were actually POOR. A family of 4 living on $25K a year. We free leased a barn down the road that we cleaned up and turned into a 6 stall barn and built xc jumps out of fallen trees, and our stadium jumps out of scrap. My father taught the local PC kids and everything we had we worked our butts off for. People would drop off problem horses or we would buy $100 horses from the auction or word of mouth. I was lucky in that my father could teach me to ride and jump. But our horses were not fancy or heck even safe at the start. BUT in a year or less we would have those horses and ponies jumping around 3'+ courses for XC and jumpers and off they would go. Not for much, but enough that we could get a couple more at times and go to a few shows a year. Really it is not that hard to get a horse jumping around a 3' course of jumps.

    We had nothing other then the horses. Now I didn't know we were poor, we had what we needed in our eyes.

    When I was 15 I left and did my first working student position as there was no way my family could afford to have me be able to take lessons from a BNT. I worked my butt off! 7 days a week. From 5am to 10pm. I learned a ton. I mucked. I groomed. It was grunt work and I learned more in those 5 months then I could have in years. I then was lucky to sell a horse for a larger sum then we could have ever dreamed of , $18k. I was lucky in that my father let me stick all of that money into a made horse that due to the US dollar being stronger then CN at the time I was able to afford. I was 17 at the time. I stayed in Canada to be a WS for the owner.

    I came back home to compete and was lucky to have my grandparents to help pay for shows. I was at that time working from 5am to 7pm training , teaching, and doing chores. I would then go work as a waitress at night.

    I eventually was a trainer at a few different places. Still grooming, teaching, training, mucking etc.

    Got injured. Got injured again. Got sick. Had to quit for 6 years. Built up a small buissness again. Now will be laid up for 8 weeks due to another surgery. Luckily am married and have my DH behind me all the way.

    And guess what? I may have paid my dues, done the hard work, competed heavy, resold well trained horses, BUT due to time off I am going to be having to pay my dues again since I have been out of the scene for to many years.

    So no matter what you are going to be grooming, busting your butt, and not always riding no matter what.

    If one of my students said they could groom at WEF and their parents were going to let them I would tell them to get off their butt and DO IT! Not only would they learn valuable tools for horse care but chances are they probably could have found a way to take lessons while they were down there too.
    I agree 100%. I think for a while I thought that it was all about the riding. But I am beginning to see that it is so important to learn every part of the industry. Your story is inspiring, and I admire you for that. My family has no money either, I work at my current barn to pay off board for my horse. If I had an opportunity at WEF to groom, I would take it too! Heck ya!



Similar Threads

  1. 1994 World Equestrian Games - Three Day VHS
    By Bikoman in forum Eventing
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Sep. 19, 2012, 09:48 AM
  2. What has the Equestrian world come to....
    By oxLetsGoCanterxo in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: Apr. 23, 2012, 01:21 AM
  3. World Equestrian Festival Aachen
    By Meshach in forum Dressage
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: Jul. 22, 2010, 08:15 AM
  4. World Equestrian Games
    By DancingQueen in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Jul. 17, 2009, 04:56 PM
  5. What is happening to the equestrian world?
    By jumpingmaya in forum Off Course
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: Dec. 1, 2008, 04:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness