The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 29, 2011
    Posts
    85

    Default Anyone ever had a horse stand like this one? Or know what caused it!

    I used to own this horse. He was one of those imperfect schoolmasters. At the time a 13 year old, 18.1hh Hanoverian x TB.

    Never a lame day in the two years I owned him and when I sold him he passed a vet check and the vet said he couldn't have trotted off sounder if he tried after the flexions. On no maintanance aside from a daily scoop of MSM and Glucosamine in his feed.

    He has apparently stood this way his whole life, basically he parks his back legs out like a gaited horse. He's perfectly capable of standing up properly, he'd stand up if you gave him a push on the butt and said stand up and he didn't stand this way undersaddle ever. But he would still stand very base wide in the back legs on the ground and undersaddle. He also would tend to stand with his neck hanging below his withers when relaxed. He looked like he'd been drugged the way he stood, and when people came to see him I actually got accused of drugging him cause he stood there legs everywhere, his constantly floopy lower lip and he was so relaxed his unmentionables were all out for the world to see aswell.

    So has anyone ever seen/had a horse that did this? I'm SURE there's a reason, he can't just do it just because. Perhaps because of his sheer size? He's over 18hh.
    Two vets have been completely unable to pin point it and one actually wanted to put him down and do an autopsy to find out why! The lady who used to own him before he came to my instructor and I bought him said that there was always "something" with his hind quarters but no vet could pin point what it was or what caused it. He was never sore, lame, or anything and has always been a willing worker.

    He also stands like a foal when he grazes, he's got massively long legs but a very narrow body.
    Please note, he was not being worked at all when these pictures were taken, I didn't have time for him which is why he was sold. So he was not being ridden aside from when people came to view him, I was paying for him to be in work when I was trying to sell him but this was before then. He also has a condition called Queensland itch (called sweet itch/summer itch in other parts of the world). He suffered terribly and we kept him rugged in light mesh/flag material blankets 24/7 which he would usually destroy in a month so he was an expensive horse to blanket! And the scars in the pictures on his hindquarters are from before he was owned by my instructor or myself, he was left in a paddock by the owner at the time nad rubbed himself raw and my instructor found him in a shocking state and bought him home. Literally no hair on his body, and the hair in those areas never grew back. I sold him down south to a nice cold climate where itch does not affect horses and he is much happier

    http://i1129.photobucket.com/albums/...n/IMG01613.jpg

    http://i1129.photobucket.com/albums/...n/IMG01620.jpg

    http://i1129.photobucket.com/albums/...n/PIC_1105.jpg

    http://i1129.photobucket.com/albums/...n/PIC_1158.jpg

    And this is him when he was in full work, not standing with the back legs far apart but with them further out than they should be. Usually he stands back legs spread far apart and underhimself.

    http://a6.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/photo...66145_6544.jpg



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2000
    Posts
    2,498

    Default

    My horse did the same thing. He was "only" 17.1. I've got a few halt pics from shows that look like he's parked out. His previous owner said he had always done that, and had gotten comments on it at shows!

    I always thought the parking out had something to do with his very flat croup, but your guy pretty much shoots that theory down, since he's the opposite. My guy also loved to stand around with his head and neck sagging. He looked either drugged, half dead, or that his enormous head was just too heavy to hold up.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2006
    Location
    Warren County, NJ
    Posts
    3,622

    Default

    Sacro-iliac subluxation can make them stand like that. I've seen a horse with a hunter's bump do so.

    But take it with a pinch of salt, not saying that is the case with this horse, just that it is a possibility.

    From the pics it didn't look like one side of the sacrum was higher than the other unless both sides were up.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 16, 2010
    Location
    Wellington, FL
    Posts
    82

    Default

    I have the opposite...my 17 hand gelding stands with his front end out as far as the cross ties will let him. Not a soundness issue, but he "learned" to do it when he would get in trouble for moving around and begging in the cross ties for carrots and treats when people walked by. His (apparent) solution was to keep his hind end in place and "creep" his front end forward until he couldn't get any further forward on the cross ties and make the cutest faces at passerby's. LOL...he thought he was pretty clever that he stayed "still" while still begging...too bad he ends up looking like a parked out saddlebred and everyone just laughs at him (although it does work once in a while and he'll get a treat from some poor sucker). I know this isn't the reason for your guy doing it behind but it just made me laugh at some of the ways these big guys stand and such (and various reasons for it).



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 2, 2007
    Location
    Upper and Lower Canada
    Posts
    2,912

    Default

    Mine stands like this in the crossties when I'm grooming him so he can get a better scratch on his gaskins, stifle and big butt. Goofcake!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2009
    Location
    Hunterdon County NJ
    Posts
    3,011

    Default

    I have known a few different horses with a few different kind of weird 'standing' habits.

    One QH who would stand on the xties with all 4 brought together. Kind of like a circus animal balancing on a ball??? He would tighten up even more when the girth got attached but never blew up. Just braced himself together with all 4 feet on, damned near, one spot.

    Have a 17+WB mare that walks her hind legs forward, under her. Front legs don't move.

    And a 17.2hh gelding that tends to park his hind legs out behind him. And if you prevent him from doing that, he walks the front legs forward so he can get basically the same effect.

    For what it's worth. I've never seen a young horse do these things. Only older (than 8 yr old) horses that have either developed habits, behaviors, compensations, etc. I know I see some 'learning' by alternating parking one front leg forward, then the other, when they are confined in stalls a lot.

    Never had a horse that lived outside their whole lives do it either.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2003
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    4,343

    Default

    My first horse, a TBxPercheron cross would "park out" all the time. We never did figure out why.

    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...type=3&theater
    Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.
    Bernard M. Baruch



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2009
    Posts
    5,001

    Default

    Yup. My horse does that. She maybe had pain or something in the past, but is pain free now, no hunters bump or anything. We figure at this point it's just comfy and she likes it. Fwiw, she's 15 this year and 16.3.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 19, 2001
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    3,858

    Default

    Yup. I have a 17.2 guy on lease who does it. If I put him in the grooming stall with his hinds under him, he steps forward in front until he's parked out. He also has stringhalt, but I no idea if it would in any way be related.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,507

    Default

    The old guy does that. He's a saddlebred and parks out when he decides he's done, but this is a pasture thing, possibly more of a stretch. I've worried about it being perhaps founder or his stifles acting up, I'm thinking it's just a comfortable position for whatever "owies" he has.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2010
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    2,084

    Default

    We have a parker as well though why exactly he does half the things he does is a mystery. He's got a fantastic sense of humor and does yoga stretches every morning when he wakes up. But in the air stretch the front legs, Carefully stretches each back leg all the way out and then brings it forward to scratch his nose on each side. His whole morning routine takes about 15-20 minutes and then he eats. Best I can figure he is a cat trapped in a horse body and no one told him. Seriously athletic horse and for a TB, best feet we've ever dealt with. I wouldn't take him out on a cross country course though... He gets a bit excited as many a UL eventer has stated.
    Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
    Originally Posted by alicen:
    What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4,160

    Default

    One of my friends looked at buying a QH gelding that did the same thing. He was around 7 or 8 and not quite 16hh. During the PPE the vet found nothing to cause it and he was completely sound. My friend did wind up passing on the horse so I don't know if anything ever developed soundness wise.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 23, 2004
    Location
    Southeast
    Posts
    1,511

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lieslot View Post
    Sacro-iliac subluxation can make them stand like that. I've seen a horse with a hunter's bump do so.
    My TB had a large hunter's bump and would stand this way.
    "You gave your life to become the person you are right now. Was it worth it?" Richard Bach



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2000
    Posts
    2,498

    Default

    Another horse I have has a large hunter's bump and never stands that way.

    Go figure.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2004
    Location
    ga
    Posts
    171

    Default

    We have a mare that park out like that also. She was never lame or off, but she was hard to collect and keep collected. We took her to a vet to see if we could find anything. Vet took xrays of her feet and found she has a severe negative palmer degree in her back feet, and to a lesser degree in her front feet. She prescribed a 2 degree wedge pad for her and it has fixed the problem. No more parking out and she can hold collection now.



Similar Threads

  1. Horse who won't stand still for mounting
    By cowgirljenn in forum Off Course
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: Jun. 13, 2012, 10:15 AM
  2. Horse won't stand on still trailer
    By December in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Apr. 17, 2011, 03:53 PM
  3. WTD? Horse Won't Stand Square?
    By Trevelyan96 in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Apr. 10, 2011, 09:51 PM
  4. What caused the passing of your older horse?
    By 4Martini in forum Off Course
    Replies: 95
    Last Post: Feb. 13, 2011, 12:09 AM
  5. Replies: 11
    Last Post: Feb. 16, 2010, 04:08 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness