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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2011
    Posts
    163

    Default Help me chose a supplement

    So I'm thinking my horse could use a supplement. His food had to be cut down because of excess energy, and as a result he has lost some weight. Ideally I'd like something that would help him keep his weight and also maybe act as a "calming supplement" or something similar. He gets somewhat anxious/unpredictable at times. I know this won't solve all our problems, but I'm thinking he should have some sort of supplement regardless to add to his diet.

    Thanks!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    669

    Default

    Try a rice bran or ground flax seed supplement, the fat keeps weight on without getting them up. We use Manna Pro Max E Glo.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2011
    Posts
    163

    Default

    Thanks.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2011
    Posts
    163

    Default

    Any other suggestions?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 15, 2008
    Posts
    66

    Default

    beet pulp. adds calories without adding beans.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2009
    Posts
    155

    Default

    beet pulp and rice bran pellets.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2000
    Location
    Keswick, VA
    Posts
    7,871

    Default

    How much hay is he eating?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2011
    Posts
    163

    Default

    2 flakes when he comes in at night and then a large roundbale when he goes outside during the day.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2000
    Location
    Keswick, VA
    Posts
    7,871

    Default

    The easiest way to increase his weight is to increase his hay at night. 2 flakes probably doesn't last him very long, and you can feed better quality hay inside versus in the roundbale.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2002
    Posts
    4,956

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CBoylen View Post
    The easiest way to increase his weight is to increase his hay at night. 2 flakes probably doesn't last him very long, and you can feed better quality hay inside versus in the roundbale.
    My thought as well....



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2011
    Posts
    163

    Default

    He is at a boarding barn and that's how much they give them. Which is not to say I couldnt pay more and have him get an extra few flakes, which I would have no problem with, but I was hoping to get him something that had some sort of nutrition besides his usual.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2000
    Location
    Keswick, VA
    Posts
    7,871

    Default

    I would spend that supplement money on the hay. He likely doesn't need "nutrition", he needs more food. Horse's diets should begin with hay. And most boarding barns are going to be reluctant to deal with the hassle of beet pulp if that isn't their routine, even if that is another good way of getting more food into him without adding a lot of energy.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 14, 2000
    Location
    Goochland, VA
    Posts
    8,567

    Default

    I'm with the more hay camp. The minimum I would feed a non-dieting horse overnight is four flakes. And roundbales are not typically made up of good quality hay. Just something to keep them busy.

    Flax seed, beet pulp and rice bran oil are also good ideas.
    Laurie
    Finding, preparing, showing and training young hunters, in hand and performance.
    www.juniorjohnsontrainingandsales.com



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2008
    Posts
    1,375

    Default

    I know some people find that it makes their horses hot, but a flake or two of alfalfa a day should help to put weight on and can also be soothing to a nervous horse's stomach.

    I'm also in the camp of more/better quality hay. At my boarding barn, I have had to buy some of my own hay because I did not like what they were feeding and I was having trouble putting weight/muscle on my 17.2hh TB mare. Plus the barn was used to dealing with ponies and quarter horse crosses and couldn't get their heads around how much hay a big TB can eat. That way I didn't have to deal with any stinginess as to how much hay she got and had more control over its quality.

    I've also had good experience with flax seed. Not only does it help to put weight on but gives them shiny coats and is supposed to be good for joint health.

    Do you have any say in what type of grain your horse gets? It would probably be helpful if you could switch to a higher fat/calorie, lower starch grain.

    As for calming supplements one of the horses in our barn gets a valerian/chamomile herbal supplement, which seems to help, but it does test if that is a concern.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    8,422

    Default

    I would also start with more hay at night . . . but boarding barns can be tricky. You could also try putting the hay in a slow hay feeder (net with very small holes) so hay lasts longer. When my horse was stalled at night I always fed a bit of alfalfa hay. It's soothing for their stomachs and is higher in calories.

    I'd also look at what else they are feeding. For my own horse, high starch feeds are like rocket fuel. I've had to work on his diet to ensure that he gets the calories & nutrition he needs (he's a bit of a hard keeper) without turning him into a nut case.

    I am in a self-care facility so have complete control over what I feed, but what works for me is beet pulp + alfalfa pellets + Triple Crown low starch.

    I also feed flax seed but don't think it makes that much of a difference for weight gain (I feed 2 cups/day).

    Last summer I fed Purina Amplify when my horse was really fretting off weight because of the bugs but it's expensive and I've found that he's holding his weight now on the above diet.

    We feed hay on an almost free choice basis (about 22 lbs/horse/day) but put it in slow feeders (Nibblenets) to reduce waste and make it last longer.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.



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