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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
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    Longing to be where I once was.....
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    2,190

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    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    Heck,what are people DOING to their manure fork that the idea of it lasting 2+ years is a novelty?
    ....
    I use one to clean up after our 3 cows. Trying to get a 30 pound frozen cow pie off the frozen ground will put any fork to the test. I usually use a sledge hammer first, but sometimes I get lazy........... Mine has 3 tines missing, but still works just fine.



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2010
    Location
    Middle America
    Posts
    585

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    I managed a big show barn for 6 years. (Show barn = lots of time in stalls = VERY dirty stalls) I cleaned a lot of those stalls; all of them on the weekends. So, I've picked my share of poop.

    I would never even bother with the Shake-fork. I have seen them used, and I've also seen those shaking-box contraptions, where the shavings fall through and the poop bounces to the end of the ramp into a wheelbarrow. I've always thought these contraptions were made for people who didn't really know how to pick out a stall.

    Those of you with complaints about the plastic pooper-scoopers just haven't found the right brand yet. Some of them REALLY stink, will break very easily. But the right brand (is it Future Fork maybe? Something like that) will last nicely. And they're WAY lighter in the hands than those old wire-tined stall forks I grew up with. (Nothing like having hand cramps after 5 stalls when you have another 15 to do...)
    In order to think outside the box, one must first know what is in the box.



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2004
    Location
    Rolling hills of Virginny
    Posts
    5,954

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    Future Forks are great. I've had the same one for the last 8 years.
    The plural of anecdote is not data.



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    10,533

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    Quote Originally Posted by Isabeau Z Solace View Post
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZsiBNibzI8

    I haven't seen the powered fork but the above linked tool is pretty effective. Loud. But effective with sawdust bedding, and reduces the amount of wasted bedding by quite a bit.
    Half the crap is falling back into the stall. (Pause at about 0:27). All those little bits going back into the bed would drive me mad. It would take about five minutes to scoop and dump that poop by hand.

    Quote Originally Posted by howardh View Post
    Great point!! When and why did plastic manure forks appear? In cold weather they snap, they snap when you step on them....they are STUPID so why are they often my only option when I go to a tack store?
    Lots of people like the plastic ones because they don't catch on rubber matting as much. I don't like them- they never feel right to me. I have a Fynalite shavings fork that I love.
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    4,949

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    Quote Originally Posted by howardh View Post
    Great point!! When and why did plastic manure forks appear? In cold weather they snap, they snap when you step on them....they are STUPID so why are they often my only option when I go to a tack store?
    I am still using a plastic one that I got 19 years ago, and used it to jam loose frozen poop balls...must be I got a good'un!
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    11,960

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    Quote Originally Posted by arabhorse2 View Post
    Future Forks are great. I've had the same one for the last 8 years.
    That is because you do not have a husband who uses it for thinks like picking up rocks, etc.

    We now have his and her forks. He is not allowed to touch mine because I hate cleaning stalls with a fork with missing tines. He just broke his third fork in five years. I bought him a new one for Christmas.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,490

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    Not sure aboout a shaking fork...I'd think that would also be annoying on your hands or wrists over time.

    I do think the shaking box things...some of them, not all...have a place depending on circumstances.

    For some places with lots of stalls/bigger boarding barn...it can be an aide for the BO who does all the stalls solo. It can save some time and wear & tear on shoulders, wrists and elbows over time.
    Or for barn help that tends to zip through stalls and waste bedding. Throwing away even only 1-2 forkfuls of good bedding per day per stall adds up to a LOT of lost money quickly when there's a lot of stalls.

    And there are folks out there with problem shoulders, wrists or elbows and the repetitive motion of stall cleaning/shaking a fork can make things painful or worse. Tossing forkfuls onto a box instead of shaking each forkful can be an enormous help to those people.

    Although the video of the one posted above seems to make the stalls worse. I'd have to go into therapy if I saw manure getting shredded into my bedding like that! The type with the grates instead of lines work a lot better. Last place I boarded, the BO wasn't very good at cleaning stalls and he also hated doing it. He bought one of the stall shifter models. And even though he was still slow (he just dawdled, stopped working to chat, etc. Very nice person, just a bit pokey) and I could pick stalls faster than he cleaned them with the machine because he was dawdling...his stalls were immaculate. The ads for that machine weren't lying when it said it removes all manure down to the size of a kernel of corn. And didn't throw out a single grain of bedding. (you removed the wet spots before shaking the rest)
    It also didn't shake the manure to pieces. And it fluffed all the bedding. I don't think it could be used for bedding other than pelleted or sawdust. Maybe the really really fine shavings...not sure though.

    So for certain instances such as injuries/chronic problems or lots and lots of stalls that you want done fast, done well and not waste a ton of bedding...some of the machines make sense. A shaking fork? Seems useless, IMO. But something like a sand fork...that has finer tines or it's own screening that *you* shake can also remove all little bits too if you have a filthy stall keeper...is an option.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Posts
    594

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    I have a hard time believing that anybody who can afford to throw $250 away on an absurd pitchfork spends a lot of time mucking out their own stalls.

    Also anybody who has ever shook a manure-filled pitchfork knows that it is an art to keep those poop-balls where they belong. I don't see a machine doing the trick.


    2 members found this post helpful.

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