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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2005
    Posts
    951

    Default Cosmetic Dentistry

    I am considering getting some cosmetic work done - but I don't know what I need/the pros/cons. The 4-6 teeth in the front on my top row don't look very "professional." They are straight, thanks to braces when I was younger, but the shape looks quite young. I have small teeth and they are more round than square. I think I'd like to get the "round" parts turns straight - but i am concerned that might make me look "horsey" or one of those people with too large of teeth. Any suggestions as to what I should do or that from which I should stay away?

    I do not know anyone in the area who has had cosmetic work - any specific questions I should ask when I go looking for the right dentist?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 26, 2001
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,363

    Default

    A good cosmetic dentist (my husband ha!) will make minor changes to your teeth via veneers or bonding or crowns. If you don't want big horsey teeth make sure that you let them know this. Changing the shape and size of your teeth drastically can mess up your bite big time. Many cosmetic dentists just slap on teeth to get a pretty look without taking into consideration the diagnostics of the bite, the shape of the person's face or the size of their mouth.

    A good cosmetic dentist take all those things into consideration. Veneers are a great way to go as you lose very little tooth in the process. Lumineers (which are like fake nails pasted over the teeth with no cutting) can give you that horsey look unless your teeth are very very small to begin with.

    Crowns are the most drastic option with major cutting on each tooth. However they are the toughest and most durable, especially on front teeth. There are problems that can come with that. Cutting on a tooth too much can cause damage that can lead to a root canal on that tooth. Which the dentist will explain to you and then tell you that the root canal $ will be your responsibility because you were informed as the the possible problems but chose to go ahead with it.

    Veneers when done well are beautiful and pretty durable. I would contact your local county dental society and ask whoever answers the phone who they would want to do their cosmetic dentistry in your area. They know everyone and they hear all the good and the bad.

    If you want to pm me with questions I will go upstairs and bug my hubby for answers for you all day. He's up there watching football so no biggy! ha!
    Lions and Tigers and Bears, oh my!!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2002
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    738

    Default

    Great info (obviously!) above!

    My first set of Veneers lasted 16 years, I believe 10 - 20 is standard. I did break a tooth chomping on a fork but it was easily repaired with a new veneer.

    Make sure you see lots of photos of the dentist's work, actual patients, so you know their style. My first veneers were from a regular family dentist who, respectfully, was not as talented nor did he use the same quality lab as the actual cosmetic dentist.

    One good place to find a cosmetic dentist in your area is the LVI website: http://www.lviglobal.com/Search/Search.aspx

    Some pro's- Veneers are painless, quick and do not stain like regular teeth. You don't have to do upper and lower teeth (I have front 8 only) but often things like TMJ can be alleviated with bite adjustments from cosmetic work on a full mouth of them. That would require someone highly specialized. You can not bleach veneers, so I would suggest doing Zoom White before getting the veneers to ensure the color the lab matches for you will be something you are happy with. Why spend all that money only to wish they were a little whiter afterwards! A good dental lab will effectively shade the veneers so they do look very natural.

    Con's - they are not covered by insurance (obviously) and can be expensive (in my area for a good LVI dentist it's roughly $2500/tooth). They are also permanent, you need to remove some of the natural tooth surface to do a good veneer. Keep in mind the initial cost and figure you will need to replace them "X" amount of times in your lifetime. They can break, as one of my front teeth did, which required a whole new veneer since bonding material does not adhere to them (and was paid all out-of-pocket).

    I hope this is helpful and definitely go out there and get some consults!

    Best,

    E



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 11, 2002
    Location
    The Cliffs of Insanity
    Posts
    3,992

    Default

    This is interesting info... I have a chipped tooth (bottom middle left)... when I went to the dentist his solution was to file that corner off! So I had this ugly snaggle tooth... I asked him if he could level it off a little and he shaved off a good 3 mm ... Wondering what the right kind of fix would be since I have since found a new dentist who does cosmetic work.


    \"For all those men who say, \"Why buy the cow when you can get the milk for free,\" here\'s an update for you: Nowadays 80% of women are against marriage. Why? Because women realize it\'s not worth buying an entire pig just to get a little sausage.\"-



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2009
    Posts
    126

    Default

    I started looking into having some cosmetic dentistry work done and was totally floored when they gave me a ballpark $$ figure. I can't get veneers because I have had to have so many fillings put in over the years. So to have my four upper front teeth fixed I would need to get braces and then most likely crowns afterward. All for a whopping $13,000. Gee, I would love to have nicer looking teeth but wow! Sticker shock!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2010
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    1,588

    Default

    I looked into veneers, but because I had so many fillings, I went with crowns. My uncle did my crowns. 17 teeth crowned and I just had to pay for the plane ticket I have a movie star smile now He did make my teeth slightly larger, not horse like, and they look sooo much nicer now.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 26, 2001
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,363

    Default

    Sakura, you can bond the tooth, which is adding a bit of material to it to make it the correct size, however this is the cheapest way it can also be a bit easy to break off, which could break off more of the actual tooth.

    Since the tooth is shorter your best bet (via hubby) is to get a crown on that tooth to even it out. A veneer may work with bonding also. Ask your dentist what they think.

    Remember a crown means cutting down your tooth and possibly exposing nerve which could result in a root canal and $$$$. He suggests (without seeing the tooth) that a veneer with bonding could do the trick.
    Lions and Tigers and Bears, oh my!!



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