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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2011
    Posts
    59

    Default Critique Please!!

    Hi guys! I am REALLY trying to improve my eq. So, I am giving COTH forum users the chance to TEAR ME APART.
    Here is video:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/oxLetsGo.../9/Z-2V2en1sSE

    BUT, before you start beating me up, I am going to let everyone know in the flat classes my heel/lower leg was constantly moving and squeezing due to my pony's hate for other horses lol as you can see every time I passed someone. Also, I entered a x-rail hunter hack class due to my pony's 'What? I have never jumped before in my life EVER!' attitude that he was having that morning ahaha (He is 8 years old and still kinda green to jumps) And as you will notice, he is a head tosser, but I must say I give him a quite large release.

    Now that hopefully you read that, have fun!
    www.youtube.com/oxletsgocanterxo



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2011
    Posts
    90

    Default

    Cute pony! I guess you could lock your knees abit more, i saw you had to push your horse on, so keeping your leg in place can be difficult. At the canter you could try leaning back a slight bit. I think thats pretty much it! keep up the good work!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2011
    Posts
    59

    Default

    Thanks !!
    www.youtube.com/oxletsgocanterxo



  4. #4

    Default

    Let me start by saying nice job with a pony that looks to be a bit sulky! That said, I think your toes are turned out way too far and you're riding off of the back of your calf and thigh. Try repositioning the stirrup across the ball of your foot with the outside branch ahead of the inside. Also, while sitting in the saddle, reach back and grab the back of your thigh and "roll" it forward towards the pommel of your saddle to get the inside of your thigh against the horse. This should help get the entire inside of your leg against the horse, which in turn will help you develop a more secure seat and center of balance. But all that being said, well done and you make a cute pair!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    13,247

    Default

    In sitting trot, relax your back, and think side to side with your hips, rather than just bouncing. It'll help you stay deep in the saddle.

    When jumping PRESS your hands onto the sides of the crest and leave them there until the horse canters off. You caught his mouth on landing, hence the headtossing. Having a loose rein is fine, but your hands came off the crest as he landed, but before he took his first canter step. That got you the head toss.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2011
    Posts
    127

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jetsmom View Post
    When jumping PRESS your hands onto the sides of the crest and leave them there until the horse canters off. You caught his mouth on landing, hence the headtossing. Having a loose rein is fine, but your hands came off the crest as he landed, but before he took his first canter step. That got you the head toss.
    I agree. Also, I noticed your hands don't appear to be independent from the rest of your body (for example if you had contact with your pony's mouth rather than a looped rein you would catch him in the mouth in rythm with your posting). I'm not sure at what level that should be taught/corrected or exercises to do so because that came naturally for me. Anyone have any suggestions?

    Cute pony and keep up the good work Love the background pic of you on your pony for your youtube home page!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Location
    Triangle Area, NC
    Posts
    6,723

    Default

    ~Weak core, as noted in seated and posting trot
    ~toes need to come in so the whole leg can lie flat against the horse
    ~collapses torso to the inside, but sits on outside seatbone
    ~chest needs to lift at the canter and elbows need to hang closer to the body.
    ~Jumped too much and ahead over both jumps, most noteably, pony was counter bent in the approach and not straight.
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2011
    Location
    Southern Pines, NC
    Posts
    2,337

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Petstorejunkie View Post
    ~Weak core, as noted in seated and posting trot
    ~toes need to come in so the whole leg can lie flat against the horse
    ~collapses torso to the inside, but sits on outside seatbone
    ~chest needs to lift at the canter and elbows need to hang closer to the body.
    ~Jumped too much and ahead over both jumps, most noteably, pony was counter bent in the approach and not straight.
    Ditto all of this.

    Also, as jetsmom noticed, while you are releasing, you aren't "keeping" your release... you caught him in the mouth on landing, hence the head toss. If I had to be nit picky, I'd say to do a courtesy circle before the first jump (it'd also have given you a better approach in that he'd probably have been more attentive).

    Other nit-picky things:
    Too large saddle pad... my second largest pet peeve.
    Pony. I know he's got the winter fuzzies and it appears to have been a schooling show, but a bit of a trim and some hoof polish would have probably given a nicer picture.

    Overall, I think you're on the right track, a lot of this has to come with experience and miles.
    I've heard there's more to life than an FEI tent and hotel rooms, so I'm trying it.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,568

    Default

    Oh my gosh are you riding my pony? He reminds me of my pony, very similar in gait.

    It looks like you really need to sit up and relax your back at the sitting trot. I would also bring your stirrups up a hole or two, in an effort to bring your leg back a little.

    Quiet your hands, and really try to not create so much movement with your body. Just sit up, relax and let him make the motion. You are really working hard at it and it doens't need to be such an effort. Easier said than done but just try to (at home) close your eyes, and learn by feeling it. He is a little downhill so that makes the canter a little more difficult to sit. Try to sit up tall, push him forward, so he can rock off his back legs, not dive with his front.

    Same over jumps. With a tall person on a pony, its really easy to over jump, get ahead. This is the worst thing you can do because a pony 1. doesnt have that much up front to "catch" you, and 2, those little turds can tuck and buck much easier than a horse. Sit back and wait for it. There doesn't need to be such an effort over smaller jumps.

    Ask me how I know? I struggle with this with my large pony CONSTANTLY.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2011
    Posts
    59

    Default

    Thanks for all of the great critique! This is useful! Keep it coming! I agree I am very rusty on my jumping skills, my previous trainer never really told me that there was anything wrong with my jumping, therefore, I formed really bad, and annoying, habits that are hard to break. My new trainer has really done a lot for me and I know its hard to believe, but my jumping actually has improved a TON. I know that sounds scary aha. Here is a more recent photo of me on the same pony:
    ***Sorry for the horrible outfit, my trip to the barn that day was unplanned***

    http://www.facebook.com/#!/photo.php...type=1&theater

    First off, I KNOW my leg position is scary in this picture, and I am pinching with my knees. The saddle pad is also way to big, I know the jump is VERY small, but once again, green-to-jumps-pony.
    www.youtube.com/oxletsgocanterxo



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2011
    Posts
    246

    Default

    Good things:
    1. Heels are nice and down
    2. Hands seem pretty nice and quiet and follow nicely a the canter.

    THings to work on
    1. Sticking your chest OUT at the canter
    2. Toes are a little too for out.
    3. Though your hand is pretty quiet it needs to be a bit farther out in front of you. I didn't notice if you were wearing a martingale but if you had a martingale on your pony than your hands should be about where the martingale is on the horse's neck.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2011
    Posts
    59

    Default

    Thanks for the critique !
    www.youtube.com/oxletsgocanterxo



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2010
    Location
    Where the tall corn grows
    Posts
    198

    Default

    What helped my sitting trot (in which my back was super wiggly) was to put both reins in one hand, and place my other hand on the flat of my back. It was easiest for me to tuck my arm behind my back and use the flat of the BACK of my hand and press it into my lower back. I would get the wiggle out of my back (you can tell when youre wiggling because your hand can feel it!) then learn to sit the trot minus wiggle. Learn what THAT feels like, then you can practice the trot without the hand, and by feel. Your core and back will be tired though! Otherwise, lovely sitting trot. (my computer is slow and I can't load any more of the video....)
    “There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man.”
    -Winston Churchill



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2006
    Location
    bucks county
    Posts
    1,294

    Default

    just something to help your position at your sitting trot, try slowing your pony down a bit. It will help you tighten your seat a lot.
    "to each his own..."

    just a horse obsessed girl who finds blogging way more fun than being an adult...
    http://equinerainman274.wordpress.com/



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2000
    Location
    Chantilly,va.
    Posts
    10,902

    Thumbs down start wityhe diagonal

    Let's start with the easy part, correct your diagonal; 2nd, release your knee and thigh; this will allow your lower leg to come on; you are gripping so tightly with knee and thigh, it is not possible to keep your lower leg in contact
    breeder of Mercury!

    remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2005
    Location
    Out in The Country
    Posts
    1,922

    Default

    I do agree with pretty much everything people said - I read the comments and then watched the video. I see so many 'critique me' posts and usually read through a lot of the comments and think - they have had enough comments to think about so I dont post. Plus I hate repeating things to people.

    My only comment is a strong agreement with using your core. You look like me when I rode after I had a C section (think about it). No STIRRUP work - and also do a lot of stretching in the saddle without your stirrups - lengthen those leg muscles. So many people do 2 point and focus so hard on the heel and the calf but not the rest of the leg. You need to open up your hip and sit back and find the core muscle. I hate to say it but a little dressage work might help too. Someone said to stick out your chest - but I dont like that - I say - open up your shoulders instead because chest-out sometimes solves one problem and starts another. I want the back to stay soft and relaxed and sticking out your chest can make someone stiff through the back.

    On the other hand, this is a CONTEXT thing because I think if you used your core more and opened your hip a little - you would bring your toes in more and your legs would hang under your body better - and I think you would be straighter and more even. AND I think considering how poor the core is - your hands are as good as they can be in that situation - I would say it is most difficult to teach kids good hands - and I think work on your core - your hands will be great with instruction. It is THERE - it just needs a core to carry it. I actually was thinking - wow, her hands are really good - a little fidgety but not bad at all considering....

    My opinion.

    ON the context with the saddle. I agree the saddle is too big for him. BUT the flap fits you. And flap is supposed to correlate with the size of the saddle. ON the other hand, there is a lot of seat behind your butt. BUT then you are rolling forward onto your pelvic bones. So maybe the saddle fits you and not him or the saddle design is wrong. Pony looks happy so its not pinching. Saddle fit - sometimes a hard thing. Hate to say this though - not sure how old you are but may not be long before you outgrow him. =(



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    3,372

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    I suggest a ton of without stirrups work to strengthen seat, back, leg, and to develop a more independent hand. It's a drag, but it works.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2011
    Posts
    59

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LaraNSpeedy View Post
    I do agree with pretty much everything people said - I read the comments and then watched the video. I see so many 'critique me' posts and usually read through a lot of the comments and think - they have had enough comments to think about so I dont post. Plus I hate repeating things to people.

    My only comment is a strong agreement with using your core. You look like me when I rode after I had a C section (think about it). No STIRRUP work - and also do a lot of stretching in the saddle without your stirrups - lengthen those leg muscles. So many people do 2 point and focus so hard on the heel and the calf but not the rest of the leg. You need to open up your hip and sit back and find the core muscle. I hate to say it but a little dressage work might help too. Someone said to stick out your chest - but I dont like that - I say - open up your shoulders instead because chest-out sometimes solves one problem and starts another. I want the back to stay soft and relaxed and sticking out your chest can make someone stiff through the back.

    On the other hand, this is a CONTEXT thing because I think if you used your core more and opened your hip a little - you would bring your toes in more and your legs would hang under your body better - and I think you would be straighter and more even. AND I think considering how poor the core is - your hands are as good as they can be in that situation - I would say it is most difficult to teach kids good hands - and I think work on your core - your hands will be great with instruction. It is THERE - it just needs a core to carry it. I actually was thinking - wow, her hands are really good - a little fidgety but not bad at all considering....

    My opinion.

    ON the context with the saddle. I agree the saddle is too big for him. BUT the flap fits you. And flap is supposed to correlate with the size of the saddle. ON the other hand, there is a lot of seat behind your butt. BUT then you are rolling forward onto your pelvic bones. So maybe the saddle fits you and not him or the saddle design is wrong. Pony looks happy so its not pinching. Saddle fit - sometimes a hard thing. Hate to say this though - not sure how old you are but may not be long before you outgrow him. =(
    Outgrowing a pony is a very sad thing, as much as I would like to own him, I do not. I'm probably not going to get any taller, but I already am cutting it close Its hard knowing that I won't be able to ride him forever, especially since I am so attached to him because we have brought each other so far. But I am enjoying the time I have with him, plus his legal owner has him up for sale, but he is way overpriced anyway, so I should have a while longer with him
    www.youtube.com/oxletsgocanterxo



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2011
    Posts
    59

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    Quote Originally Posted by Carol Ames View Post
    Let's start with the easy part, correct your diagonal; 2nd, release your knee and thigh; this will allow your lower leg to come on; you are gripping so tightly with knee and thigh, it is not possible to keep your lower leg in contact
    I don't mean to sound rude, but I went back and watched the video over again, and I was on the correct diagonal the entire time......
    www.youtube.com/oxletsgocanterxo



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    13,247

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oxLetsGoCanterxo View Post
    I don't mean to sound rude, but I went back and watched the video over again, and I was on the correct diagonal the entire time......
    Yes, you were.



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