The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,553

    Default Window in viewing room to arena; how to minimize risk?

    So we are mid construction of our new barn and arena. The arena is attached to the barn and I have designed it so that there is a 42 inch by 42 inch window looking from the tack room into the arena. The arena will be used mostly for riding; I don't plan to turn out horses in the arena.

    However, free jumping is on the agenda. Now I am worrying about a horse kicking through the window or getting confused by a reflection and running into it.

    How much of a risk is that? If I get bars welded across the front of it, it sort of defeats the purpose of having a viewing room.

    Apparently I have a limitless capacity for worrying about things....
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2009
    Posts
    2,998

    Default

    I wouldn't be worried, many dressage barns have mirrors without problems, so I don't think a window will be a problem
    .



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    5,429

    Default

    Can you set the window back from the arena wall so it isn't right there in the arena? Not sure that makes sense, but thinking you would have arena, then the kick wall around arena, then have the window set back a bit from that, so the window has some protection by being set outside the arena somewhat. Having the viewing room floor a bit higher than the arena floor also helps as the window will be that much higher.

    Turnout in rings with mirrors always scares me -- I have seen where horses have kicked them, so it does happen. We were at one barn where my horse would go down to rear up at his reflection, and I worried he would strike out (the mirrors were right there on/in the arena, so no gap), so if he got turned out in the ring, I had to stay down there with a whip to protect the "other horse" from him.

    I suppose if this is your own barn, you could devise a sliding cover for the window -- so you could cover it if you are turning someone out and want to protect the glass. Wouldn't be hard to do if you have room to do it.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    10,280

    Default

    One barn I boarded at had shades on rollers that would be rolled down to cover the mirrors lining the indoor when horses were turned out in there.

    horsepoor's idea of a cover for the window is a good one.
    If there isn't room for a slider, maybe a hinged cover - same material as the kickboard - if you have room for that?
    Perhaps a PITA to put up, but less worry about horses inured and/or windows broken.

    Even if you use lucite in place of glass there can be sharp, jagged edges if it breaks.

    The shades worked fine, except for my TB who would poke his nose under the shade so he could Shnort!! at the "Other Horse"
    He did also strike at his reflection, but the mirrors were hung above his knee level.
    If he'd reared it could have been ugly....
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2000
    Location
    Concord, NH
    Posts
    5,164

    Default

    Whenever I was at a barn were horses were turned out in an indoor with windows or mirrors, poles were placed so the horses could not get near them. Free jumping would be the same, I would think.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    15,414

    Default

    Put a regular window screen on the arena side if it worries you that much.
    http://www.metroscreenworks.com/shop...en-c-2_99.html
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2005
    Location
    Elmwood, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,384

    Default

    Is it possible to buy a sheet of safety glass like car windshields are made from? This would break into many small pieces if a horse did kick it.
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    45,929

    Default

    You could ask a glass company or sun room company if they can make you the window out of their double pane special glass that doesn't break easily, just shatters.

    There use such for glass doors and windows in commercial buildings.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    4,897

    Default

    You know how they make prey bird sillouettes to keep birds from flying into windows? Make a person with lunge whip sillouette for your window.

    I like the blinds I idea though.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    8,227

    Default

    We have a viewing room in the corner of the arena at the barn we board at with vertical safety glass panels (car-type). They look nice, but because of their close proximity to the ring the vet was not impressed. Frankly, he has a point. If a moose can go through the panels and kill a person in a car, a horse could do likewise. Overall, glass does not impress this man. However, in a flat window connecting the tack room to the arena, with a shade over it when not in use, safety glass would probably be the best choice.
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

    http://s1098.photobucket.com/albums/...2011%20Photos/



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    10,148

    Default

    You can get sheet acrylic and have it made up, I think the brand name is Lexan, or you can create some sort of barrier - my last trainer had her carts all lined up against the viewing room wall and a barrier, but she also had standard slider windows all along the walls for light, right about horse head height, which wasn't good, but neither had she ever had a horse kick out and hit one, knock on wood.

    Arena wise, in an indoor I'd advise that you have an actual arena and not use any wall that has a small opening of any kind, such as a door or a window as your arena wall. I've seen people poke their heads out of a sash window right into the track and startle the horse, dumping the rider, and I walked out of the bright light right into the track once when there was a horse cantering along and got the rider dumped. Big roll up or slider doors are a bit better that way, but if you walk straight into the track it's really not safe.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2009
    Posts
    541

    Default

    Having grown up in an arena that had the mirrors. believe me when I say, you do want to make your window a commercial safety glass or a plastic. We had too many accidents with riders or horses and the mirrors. The barn ended up getting rid of the mirrors until they could eventually be replaced with safe ones.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2009
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    2,284

    Default

    http://www.doityourself.com/stry/lam...ros-and-cons#b

    This seems like a great place to utilize a laminated glass window. Especially if it is a solid viewing window as opposed to a sash type window. Many of the laminated windows are rated for hurricanes for residential and commercial applications.

    http://www.cardinalcorp.com/products...rricane-glass/
    Last edited by jawa; Dec. 21, 2011 at 08:29 PM. Reason: Added another link.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2009
    Location
    Rock Chalk!
    Posts
    3,247

    Default

    Our indoor has both mirrors (3) and viewing windows (2). Horses are not allowed to be turned out without a person present. We do free-jumping, etc.

    The mirrors are some sort of safety mirrors, and in the five years I've boarded there we haven't had a problem. They are set high enough a horse isn't going to kick them.

    Our viewing windows the smallish one is set into the wall about 12". The other is quite large (two that are probably 12' wide each, with about 18" between) is situated between two doors (one people door into our clubhouse and the other big slider and has an upright post in the middle where the windows aren't. I am not sure what type of glass they are.
    A proud friend of bar.ka.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,553

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CHT View Post
    You know how they make prey bird sillouettes to keep birds from flying into windows? Make a person with lunge whip sillouette for your window.

    I like the blinds I idea though.
    Too funny.
    I actually thought of those bird of prey silhouettes and as a joke for myself wondered what you would do for a horse.

    Some good ideas here, thank you. I think I will into some sort of laminated or safety glass and talk to the builder about setting the window in a bit more.

    Also something simple, like poles across the window, is an excellent idea too.
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2009
    Location
    Dairyville USA
    Posts
    2,979

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big_Grey_hunter View Post
    I wouldn't be worried, many dressage barns have mirrors without problems, so I don't think a window will be a problem
    Three times in my career (including once while on ambulatory rotation in 4th year) I have arrived too late to save a horse that became injured by the arena mirrors or windows.

    Only one of the horses was loose in the arena-pulled away from handler while being longed, spooked, crashed through window.

    One horse bolted, bucking spree, hit the mirror, panicked, hit the other mirror(s.)

    The third I'm not sure, I think youngster just learning jumping, in a covered but not fully enclosed arena attempted to jump out through the mirror (rider escaped with minor injuries)

    Once I arrived just in time, I was really too concerned with stopping the bleeding and suturing to inquire as to what happened.

    The viewing windows at the farm I grew up riding at were actually fenced off from the arena for safety, but still horses were never allowed loose in there (nor were they free-jumped). It was not until school that I realized why they were so strict about having no loose horses in the indoor.

    If you really really want to have the windows, I would suggest looking into that shatterproof safety glass they have at schools and in construction zones.
    Michael: Seems the people who burned me want me for a job.
    Sam: A job? Does it pay?
    Michael: Nah, it's more of a "we'll kill you if you don't do it" type of thing.
    Sam: Oh. I've never liked those.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,429

    Default

    hmmm...not sure I have any ideas on how to make it perfectly safe...(can you tell us: what area inside the arena the opening would look out on? (I mean: long side of arena? short end?.) too bad the arena itself isn't a bit 'larger' than you actually need, where in you could: have a half walled 'enclosed' seating area/walkway here...(think: walkway down this side, half wall is now the actual arena wall...) then, the window is not accessable (just don't put your seating area in front of it) ) THEN...wouldn't it be cool to put in one of those 'one way mirrors'....Mirror for the horsey/riding side, viewing from the tack room!
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2002
    Location
    East of Dog River
    Posts
    6,075

    Default

    One word - Lexan. It comes in various thicknesses from normal window pane thick to hockey arena thick. It's superior to plexiglass - doesn't change colour to that nasty yellow, is stronger and doesn't deteriorate over time like regular plexiglass. Lexan is the stuff of headlamp lenses, safety glasses, etc. and lasts a long time before replacement is needed. I have a piece of greenhouse Lexan replacing a busted window in the workshop, and it is over 10 years old, and no changes and it still lets through the same amount of light it did when I installed it (it's translucent rather than clear and gets full sun).
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2006
    Posts
    425

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    You can get sheet acrylic and have it made up, I think the brand name is Lexan...
    Lexan (polycarbonate, not acrylic ) is a great choice for applications where glass or plexiglass (acrylic) might break.

    .



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,553

    Default

    Window is at the end of the long end pretty much in the middle of the short side.

    Lexan. Hmm..I wonder where in Canada one might order Lexan?
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 27
    Last Post: Apr. 17, 2012, 03:24 PM
  2. How to leave & minimize hard feelings
    By Anon12 in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: Feb. 2, 2012, 03:14 PM
  3. would you risk riding in a terribly deep arena?
    By HoofHeartSoul in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: Oct. 4, 2011, 11:39 PM
  4. which chores to skip or minimize?
    By ayrabz in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: Jun. 16, 2009, 04:17 PM
  5. Wound management to minimize scarring
    By onqhanoverians in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: Apr. 19, 2009, 01:37 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •