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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2008
    Posts
    444

    Default Will reflocking a saddle help bridging?

    I got a saddle on trial and I love it. It does bridge a little in the center. Has anyone had any luck reflocking to fix this problem? My hrose is only 3 years old, so he will fill out more Im sure.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Posts
    3,304

    Default

    A good saddle fitter will be able to tell you whether reflocking will fix it. It depends why it is bridging and if it is wool flocked.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2001
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,963

    Default

    Talk to a good saddle fitter, but I don't think so. Bridging is caused by something not right in the front or back ofthe saddle, so the actual gap is more of a symptom IME.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2008
    Posts
    444

    Default

    should there be some bridging or should the saddle fit totally flat?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
    Posts
    8,672

    Default

    No. Run away from a saddle that bridges for a 3 year old. Often as the horse gets older the withers and shoulders developing will make it worse as the horse is worked. It's a really good way to get bucked off.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2008
    Posts
    444

    Default

    so, when putting some weight down on the saddle with your palm, should the saddle be totally in contact?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    4,948

    Default

    The panels should make even contact throughout. No bridging anywhere... bridging is a sign of BAD fit. You should be able to slip a flat hand under the saddle, and slide it down the front (under the points of the tree) without any gaping to tight spots. You should be able to do the same from front to back, no bridging, no tight spots.

    If it is bridging in the middle, that means it is most likely tight on the shoulders/ wither and at the back of the panels towards the cantel, making a 'bridge'. Ouch!

    As the horse fills out, you can expect the front of the saddle to get tighter, causing even more bridging.

    I too have a young horse, luckily for me ($$ wise) a wintec adjustable saddle is fitting well (no bridging any where, no dry spots, lots of panel contact, tons of wither / spine clearance). I have had to switch plates (from M to MW and back) a few times as she has developed, added and dropped weight etc.

    Now that she is 4 1/2 and settling into a size, I am hunting for a new, permanent saddle.

    Good luck!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    8,535

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bluedapple View Post
    so, when putting some weight down on the saddle with your palm, should the saddle be totally in contact?
    The saddle should be totally in contact even without you putting weight on the saddle. It should just sit there and match the contours of the back.

    Unless you are talking about the gullet, which should definitely clear the spine even when weight is applied.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2008
    Posts
    444

    Default

    thanks a ton!! That really helps!



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