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  1. #1
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    Feb. 4, 2008
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    Default Friesian Sporthorses??

    Please give me the goods, the bad, and the any..!!.would like to know their strengths, and weaknesses. Can they jump? How do they fair in dressage? What is their stamina like? I hear they tend to have great temperaments..? good feet? what about conformation..does the cross help make them versatile? I know the cross is imp..but any info is helpful.

    THANKS in advance!!

    MB
    ridin' high



  2. #2
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    Oct. 13, 2006
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    Im riding one right now!

    He is an exceptionally gifted one from what I can tell though. Ive ridden three of them and all in dressage, sometimes dealing with behind the leg, forward without the "forward" and at times heavy on the front end... Some are a bit out behind or straight behind.

    Trouble in paradise with...

    Lead Changes
    And sometimes the three p's

    This is JUST my experience and totally not generalizing but giving my own opinion riding three very nice well bred sport horse imports.

    What I love

    Their tempo can be unparalleled, the big fancy gaits they have especially extensions, and obviously they are strong strong strong so they can really jump ahead in training quick if ridden right and you get them using themselves.

    What you need

    A STRONG stable leg
    A SOFT inside hand (or they have a tendency to get super strong and I mean heavy heavy heavy dont give them anything to lean on!)

    What you'll have

    A fabulous time!

    Incredible animal all and all, but no cookie cutter dressage horse the Friesian makes



  3. #3
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    Jul. 16, 2009
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    I think the answers to your questions depend greatly on the cross. I have a Friesian X National Show Horse (Arabian X Saddlebred), she came out well and is stunning. She doesn't like jumping, but is VERY sensitive and seems to really enjoy the challenge of dressage. My mare is very athletic, she is lighter boned than many of the crosses out there, she certainly could jump, but I do not jump, so she will probably only be taught to do little cross rails just to mix things up from time to time. She listens intently to my seat, but she has a tendency to get bored easily and find monsters when she does (but then again, she's quite young as well). She's very even tempered for a youngster, extremely sweet, very willing, and would try anything for me. She's never displayed an angry moment under saddle and the trainer that started her was impressed that he was able to get on and ride from the start. There was never any funny business, no bucking, rearing, or attitude. As we progress in our training, she's never gotten an attitude with me, or gotten angry about any request I've ever made of her. If she doesn't understand, she simply tries "something" and then waits for a response as to whether that was the right or wrong response to my request. She's absolutely a dream to ride, despite her extremely athletic moments (ie. spooks).

    The cons.... the bad ones. There are a TON of not-so-great Friesian crosses out there. It really is a crap shoot when they're bred what you'll end up with. When I was shopping, I saw all sorts. I tried to stay away from the non-type-to-type crosses. In other words, stock horse x friesian. While there have been some nice ones, the majority that I saw for sale seemed to be a hodge-podge of the two breeds.

    Another con, if you're looking to do dressage, you will have to work through the upside down neck muscle that these guys are VERY prone to have. Their built with high-set necks and because of this, they will easily go into a false frame and display the appearance of collection (to the untrained eye) without having actually achieved it. Long and low is key for these guys to teach them to stretch their necks down, and build muscle along the top of the neck and down the back.

    The more successful ones I've seen have been Friesians crossed with Arabians, saddlebreds, and thoroughbreds.



  4. #4
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    Jul. 16, 2009
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    Default

    PS.... Here's a pic of my girl.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/kris0227/6338659204/



  5. #5
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    Sep. 18, 2011
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    They tend to lack stamina so keeping them in shape may be hard. This is especially true in heat. Some of them have the Friesian moose mentality - would definitely rather go through something than over it. And also means training in forward can be exhausting.

    Conformation faults to watch for:
    out behind
    short backs
    weak loins
    heavier in front than back (big necks, small hind ends)

    The cross is important but really look at both parents. If either one wouldn't make a decent dressage horse, walk on by. Also beware parents that aren't complimentary: opposites only attract bad conformation.

    There are some nice ones out there. I prefer Morgan-Friesian despite the upright neck. Think the TB crosses tend to too many weaknesses. There are always exceptions but would look at older horses to avoid gambling.



  6. #6
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    Sep. 18, 2011
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    Should add, check the canter carefully. Friesians tend towards awful canters and fixing can be for the brave of heart and sticky of seat.



  7. #7
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    Jul. 16, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gimbalist View Post
    Should add, check the canter carefully. Friesians tend towards awful canters and fixing can be for the brave of heart and sticky of seat.
    I second this! Definitely check the canter.



  8. #8
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    Jun. 8, 2008
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    Well my sister has a stallion, he is wonderful!

    The bad:
    can be a little heavy on the fore hand. They need a strong leg, and a change in routine. They are really smart, so they get bored easy. My sister just switches things up by riding in the jumping arena and he is happy seeing new sights.

    yes they can jump.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sOWXp2HZANA&feature=fvsr
    This is only his second jumping lesson.


    The Good:
    they have a great personality and an awesome temperament.
    Very smart and willing to take on a new challenge!


    are you looking into just friesian sport horses? or just friesians in general. There is a difference in the sport versus the the "not" sport. My sister's stallion is a sport horse, and she wants to get the "sport" stamp on his papers, but needs a lot more shows first.

    anyways, if you are going pure, really look into the lines, there are a LOT of crappy ones out there!



  9. #9
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    Jun. 8, 2008
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    Sorry I just realized that you posted in two different threads, I thought I lost my mind and forgot to press the "post reply" button, so I typed it all out again.

    :-P



  10. #10
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    Nov. 10, 2005
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    Va
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    I have a friend who has one. The sire is purebred Fresian, the dam has Clyde and Standardbred a few generations back.She is a nice looking horse although is a bit heavier in the front than the rear. With work, she has gotten lighter on her forehand. She has been taught to jump(very low levels), but definitely not her forte. She is very kind to her rider when being ridden, and generally has a nice disposition. Her canter is a work in progress. The only thing negative I can say is she can pull a stubborn "tude" occasionally, and once she decides she doesn't want to do something, there is no way you are getting her 17h self to do it. I have always had TB's , so the cold blood mentality is foreign to me. You can not hit her or she shuts down worse. Her main "tude" area is the trailer. 95% of the time she loads fine, the other 5% not happening in this lifetime. As a horse to own, the breed wouldn't appeal to me, but my friend loves her to pieces. I think the cross definitely makes a huge difference, but I think that matters as well in some of the other crosses people come up with for sporthorses, such as Clyde/TB or Percheron/TB



  11. #11
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    Mar. 24, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by kris0227 View Post
    Another con, if you're looking to do dressage, you will have to work through the upside down neck muscle that these guys are VERY prone to have. Their built with high-set necks and because of this, they will easily go into a false frame and display the appearance of collection (to the untrained eye) without having actually achieved it. Long and low is key for these guys to teach them to stretch their necks down, and build muscle along the top of the neck and down the back.
    I said something very similar in the duplicate thread when I responded. Stretching forward/down is definitely key to getting them using their body right!

    I love your horse in your photos - very nice!

    If I were shopping for a dressage horse, my mom's horse would not have been a top pick. She was a trail horse until I started working with her more in September (I had ridden her on occasion before, but never regularly like I am now.) She has one of those challenging canters, as she's 10 and I'm not sure she ever had really voluntarily cantered in her life! It's actually turning out to be a pretty fun canter, but getting there was interesting.

    A couple pics (posted on the other thread) for fun.

    http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7009/6...c482a931f2.jpg

    http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7019/6...4d16f08c29.jpg
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  12. #12
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    Oct. 13, 2006
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    I have a quick clip of me trotting around on the one Im riding but I dunno how to post or make link to a video lol its not youtube so



  13. #13
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    I think I got it on webshots but it uploaded like crap anyway 2nd ride on this boy and just a quick vid

    http://good-times.webshots.com/video...01143328agzTOT



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by netg View Post
    I said something very similar in the duplicate thread when I responded. Stretching forward/down is definitely key to getting them using their body right!

    I love your horse in your photos - very nice!

    If I were shopping for a dressage horse, my mom's horse would not have been a top pick. She was a trail horse until I started working with her more in September (I had ridden her on occasion before, but never regularly like I am now.) She has one of those challenging canters, as she's 10 and I'm not sure she ever had really voluntarily cantered in her life! It's actually turning out to be a pretty fun canter, but getting there was interesting.

    A couple pics (posted on the other thread) for fun.

    http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7009/6...c482a931f2.jpg

    http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7019/6...4d16f08c29.jpg
    Just saw these ALWAYS love your pics Lovely pony! Looks athletic

    Plus I miss my Arizona



  15. #15
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    Oct. 13, 2003
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    Eastern Pacific coast
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    Friesian Focus has a nice dressage stallion - Monte 378. He was imported a few years ago. http://www.friesianfocus.com/
    -Amor vincit omnia-



  16. #16
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    Jul. 16, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by netg View Post
    I said something very similar in the duplicate thread when I responded. Stretching forward/down is definitely key to getting them using their body right!

    I love your horse in your photos - very nice!

    If I were shopping for a dressage horse, my mom's horse would not have been a top pick. She was a trail horse until I started working with her more in September (I had ridden her on occasion before, but never regularly like I am now.) She has one of those challenging canters, as she's 10 and I'm not sure she ever had really voluntarily cantered in her life! It's actually turning out to be a pretty fun canter, but getting there was interesting.

    A couple pics (posted on the other thread) for fun.

    http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7009/6...c482a931f2.jpg

    http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7019/6...4d16f08c29.jpg
    She's beautiful!



  17. #17
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    Mar. 24, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by NOMIOMI1 View Post
    Just saw these ALWAYS love your pics Lovely pony! Looks athletic

    Plus I miss my Arizona
    I believe it - Arizona is a special place which grabs you! (Or makes you hate it and run away as quickly as possible.) It always amazes me how great the background tends to look in photos here. Living basically in the middle of nowhere has its benefits!

    Quote Originally Posted by kris0227 View Post
    She's beautiful!
    Thanks!

    She's proving quite fun. Right now she's basically my play project since Mom hasn't felt like riding and I think it's unfair to just leave her sitting. She's fairly opposite to my horse, but we're enjoying playing around, and I believe riding two vastly different horses is good for me as a rider.

    Our biggest problem right now is actually anticipation - she's eager to do things, and throws fits if I don't just let her do them! Not what I ever expected to have with her, so obviously I'm doing something right that she's wanting to work instead of resisting it!
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  18. #18
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    Aug. 15, 2010
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    If you are talking about Friesian crosses (not just "Sporthorses" which is a specific registry), then I can definately comment. Just like any other horse, there are good and bad, and you have to assess the specific horse. I specifically breed Friesian/Warmblood crosses, and have one stallion (LSH Cadence In Color) who has shown through Grand Prix - the piaffe, passage, and pirouettes are quite easy for him, the flying changes were tricky.

    I have (and have had over the years) several youngsters and all have been easy to start, all have had excellent canters. Not all Friesians have bad canters - some bloodlines are more suited to driving (and often have bad canters), but others are quite good. My young Friesian stallion gets 8s on his canter work, but he's got good riding bloodlines. We've just started schooling the changes with him (he's coming 6), and sometimes he gets them, sometimes he doesn't. OTOH, his half brother (a Friesian/WB cross that I started and sold a few years back) is also just starting to school the changes, and he's GOT them already

    Conformationally, things to look for - good loin, well connected neck (some of the driving type Friesians have necks that are way to high set and curvy - that "swan curve" is HARD to ride properly). Make sure they don't trail their hind legs, although be aware that many of them actually move better under saddle then at liberty! Also look for one that covers ground, like some Warmbloods, they can easily develop that "hovering" trot and get way too slow in the hind leg.

    I find the purebreds struggle with stretching type work, but the crosses (when well crossed) seem to overcome many of those challenges. The purebreds are harder to get fit, but many of the crosses (again, when well crossed) often get better stamina. Several of mine have been energizer bunnies, happy to go and go and go, but again, I'm crossing to Warmbloods, so some of that comes from the Warmblood side.

    I focus on dressage, but have had a few that enjoy jumping - we just started one "coming 4 year old" over a few small jumps, and he loves it! One I sold a couple of years ago is starting to school cross country jumps and is really bold and happy jumping.

    I would assess them just like any other Warmblood horse - look for a horse with three good gaits and reasonable conformation for the job, and a willing work attitude.

    ETA - if you want to see video, pictures, etc, feel free to browse the website, I have lots of pics and video links.
    Last edited by MysticOakRanch; Jan. 17, 2012 at 10:34 AM.



  19. #19
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    Nov. 18, 2010
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    I have a friesian sport horse. She's friesian/paint, and I ride dressage. She jumps very nicely and is amazingly courageous. She doesn't care what you point her at, she'll go over it. She also reacts the same in the ring... Anything scary and she'll walk up to it and sniff it on her own.

    This mare turned out fairly well conformation wise, but I guess her siblings were not so lucky. Her canter has been a real struggle though.

    Oh, and I love how personable and people oriented the friesian breed is.

    Here's a vid of us at our only show last summer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9swu280-vqo



  20. #20
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    Here's my mom's 5 y/o Friesian x Morgan. Sweet, willing personality...very sensitive...would jump through hoops of fire for my mom.

    http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h3...day2011010.jpg

    http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h3...day2011142.jpg

    http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h3..._4372319_o.jpg



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