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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 1999
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    Rochester, NY
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    13,219

    Default Project Feeder Watch/Cornell Lab of Ornithology

    Anyone else doing this watch? This is my first year, and, though I have had bird feeders for many years, I find that, by watching so that I can get an accurate count, I'm spending more time both watching, and learning.

    http://www.birds.cornell.edu/pfw/

    I like the fact that there are people from all over the country watching, and that, in some small way, I'm actually helping Cornell study, and perhaps preserve, our wild birds.

    I don't know if it's too late to sign on for this year or not, but I think it's excellent fun and urge anyone who is interested in birds to sign up for next year, if you can't still get in this year.

    One thing that I have noticed, and wonder about is that, at the beginning of the count, in November, I had about an even distribution of chickadees and titmouses (titmice?). As the weeks have progressed, I have noticed less chickadees, and more titmouses. This week, I haven't seen a single chickadee. I don't remember this in past years and wonder if the chickadees are being displaced by the titmouses?
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 1999
    Location
    Someplace Wet
    Posts
    9,066

    Default

    Louise good for you on doing this project. I loved it when I did it.

    Not suere about the titmouse question as we dont have them here. My limited expereice, arent the titmouse a more bold bird than the chickadee. That would certainly acount for some change.

    Another factor might be predation and disruption of the feeding flock that the chickadees associated with. How is your woodpecker number. Often woodpeckers ( downy and hairy) act as sentinals for a feeding guild / mixed flock. If this bird is lost, there is a possiblity of the flock to change its behavior

    and disease can be selective a tough factor.

    I miss you and it is good to hear from you. Enjoy PFW I certainly did and learned a lot year to year.

    we are having a Snowy Owl irruption year, not sure how that might play in to the regional bird movements. There might be some historic info. Watch you state Ornithology group for CBC numbers and comments.



  3. #3
    Louise is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
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    Oct. 21, 1999
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    Rochester, NY
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    Default

    My resident redbellied woodpecker is still around, and I have seen a downy this year, also. That's pretty good, since I don't put suet out. I can't seem to get it high enough so that I can reach the feeder to refill it without a ladder, and the red fox who lives hereabout can't reach it.

    It's been very warm here, and that may be disturbing the balance. There's a snowy owl incursion going on here, too. There was a sighting a couple of miles from here, but I haven't seen one yet. They have been known to hang out in my woods, however, so I haven't given up hope.

    I'm getting the blogging bug again, and should be starting up after the new year, just not with the same frequency, perhaps. So, keep me on your blog list, hoopoe, because I'll be back.
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 1999
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    Someplace Wet
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    Default

    Oh you can guarantee I do. My frequency has dropped as well but I still get the urge to write and am still exploring.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Posts
    1,228

    Default

    That is one of the things I always wanted to do, but now you have given me the kick in the butt to "Just Do It!".... thanks..
    We do not have an overpopulation of dogs, we have an under population of responsible dog owners!!!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2010
    Location
    Upstate New York
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    Default

    This looks interesting. And I've just started to feed birds again during the past couple of years. Previous owners never had any landscaping put in. I did a couple of summer ago, and it has made a huge difference in the birds I've seen. And as I began to spend more time back here at home last year, I added regularly putting up feeders. Just haven't done them yet this year because it also means attracting squirrels close to the house.

    There are birds here I've never really seen that often - orioles, indigo buntings, etc. See lots and lots of goldfinches & cardinals. I don't get many chickadees at this house, and always had elsewhere. Actually, the name of the hill behind me is "Hawk Mountain" so that gives you a clue of what else we have to deal with. But thanks, Louise - I'm going to look into this.
    How can there be so many currents in such a little puddle?
    National Velvet



  7. #7
    Louise is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
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    Oct. 21, 1999
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    Default

    CVPeg, I get squirrels, too.

    http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL72.../400252367.jpg

    I have to put seed on the ground so that they stay off of the feeders and give the birds a chance.

    I get lots of mourning doves and those seem to be the birds that the hawks take most often. I saw one grab one once, and, every once in a while, I'll see a little pile of dove-grey feathers. However, maybe it's a good thing. My high count for mourning doves under the feeder at one time was 27.
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2007
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    NY
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    5,071

    Default

    Louise, that's 20 squirrels, enough for an army!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 1999
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    Someplace Wet
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    Default

    are the turkey ladies coming around??



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
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    Default

    My mother has been a member I think longer than I've been alive, and we've both done their ornithology correspondence course. She does feeder watch and the counts, I'm not very good at it.

    eBird is another fun one and IIRC they were the ones who needed photo proof from mom for 120 Eastern wild turkeys. (She's not kidding. They're a plague.)



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2008
    Location
    land of the Canucks aka West Coast B.C.
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    3,746

    Default

    I don't do it here in Oz but at home we kind of did. Parents are big naturalists /bird watchers and participate in the annual bird count around the city. That bird count includes a feeder count as well. They usually keep a close eye on the feeder /garden through out the year as well. Not sure if the nature centre, which mom runs and does the bird count, sends in their results to Cornell or not.

    I'm trying to learn all of the Ozzie birds around the farm. So far i have about 6-8 birds of prey ranging from the awesome Wedgetail Eagles to Peregrin Falcon and Black Shoulder Kites. To loads of Gelahs ( annoying grey/pink parrots, black cockatoos and very pretty blue fairy wrens.

    P.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
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    Default

    Galahs aren't annoying, they're cute! (Okay, I don't have to live with them wild...)



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2008
    Posts
    3,132

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    I just registed last week and I'm waiting for my info packet to arrive! For anyone thinking about doing it, there's a $5 off coupon code (Kaytee) which brings the price down to $10. I've never done it before but I'm looking forward to it.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2010
    Location
    Upstate New York
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Louise View Post
    CVPeg, I get squirrels, too.

    http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL72.../400252367.jpg

    I have to put seed on the ground so that they stay off of the feeders and give the birds a chance.

    I get lots of mourning doves and those seem to be the birds that the hawks take most often. I saw one grab one once, and, every once in a while, I'll see a little pile of dove-grey feathers. However, maybe it's a good thing. My high count for mourning doves under the feeder at one time was 27.
    It's an army!

    I have one feeder right outside my front window next to my desk. So I can be out there in seconds to shoo them away. What I really get unnerved about is the couple that stand their ground, and yell back at me.
    How can there be so many currents in such a little puddle?
    National Velvet



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    In Jingle Town
    Posts
    35,046

    Default

    Too bad I can't tell a chicken from a hawk....

    (seriously, if it's not a robin or a Cardinal...I am lost.)

    But a cool thing to consider. I was just today looking at all the different seeds, wondering what all they would attract.

    Lucky my kitties seem to keep the squirrels honest and from forming mobs.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



  16. #16
    Louise is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
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    Oct. 21, 1999
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    Default

    I saw the turkey ladies last week, hoopoe, along with Mr. Tom. There are still 11 of them, so that's a good thing. They typically don't come around as much once the guns start going off back in the woods, and in the Winter, with the deep snow, don't make it to the feeder too much (silly things forget that they could fly in).

    And, yes, it is an army of squirrels. They are so funny to watch that I don't begrudge them the food. When one gets scared and runs through all of the others, causing them to jump straight up in the air, I laugh so hard I cry. It looks like a sea of jack in the boxes going off.

    Alagirl, Cornell has another site - All About Birds - http://www.allaboutbirds.org/Page.aspx?pid=1189&ac=ac
    It's a wonderful site that will help you identify just about any bird you see, or hear.
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    In Jingle Town
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Louise View Post
    I saw the turkey ladies last week, hoopoe, along with Mr. Tom. There are still 11 of them, so that's a good thing. They typically don't come around as much once the guns start going off back in the woods, and in the Winter, with the deep snow, don't make it to the feeder too much (silly things forget that they could fly in).

    And, yes, it is an army of squirrels. They are so funny to watch that I don't begrudge them the food. When one gets scared and runs through all of the others, causing them to jump straight up in the air, I laugh so hard I cry. It looks like a sea of jack in the boxes going off.

    Alagirl, Cornell has another site - All About Birds - http://www.allaboutbirds.org/Page.aspx?pid=1189&ac=ac
    It's a wonderful site that will help you identify just about any bird you see, or hear.

    AH thankyouthankyouthankyou!!
    I had that bookmarked a while back but since killed the computer!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



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