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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2002
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    3,424

    Default Peanut hay?

    Someone not far from me is selling Peanut hay and I know nothing about it. They say that's good for horses and cows. Anyone feed it? Anything one should know about it? Any information at all?
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2009
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,651

    Default

    http://www.florida-agriculture.com/l...peanut_hay.htm

    http://forum.equisearch.com/forums/p/44010/311527.aspx

    It seems there are two different forms of "peanut hay", one which is a perennial similar to alfalfa and one which is the baling of the plant from which the peanuts have been harvested. The perennial is worth using, the by product of peanut harvesting not so much.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,151

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jawa View Post
    http://www.florida-agriculture.com/l...peanut_hay.htm

    http://forum.equisearch.com/forums/p/44010/311527.aspx

    It seems there are two different forms of "peanut hay", one which is a perennial similar to alfalfa and one which is the baling of the plant from which the peanuts have been harvested. The perennial is worth using, the by product of peanut harvesting not so much.
    Found the same links out of curiosity, yay google.

    Interesting thread about it, link #2....
    Nudging "Almost Heaven" a little closer still...
    http://www.wvhorsetrainer.com



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2002
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    3,424

    Default

    I had read those already, after making this topic, but thanks. Anyone here actually use it themselves? I don't think this is the hay from leftover peanut plants, but the actual perennial peanut hay. I left a message to try and verify this.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    I bought some of the hay from harvesting peanuts for my cattle. They are eating it well enough but it's brown and dirty with huge stems that the cattle are not eating. I was told that it is NOT appropriate feed for horses and he tells people to not use it. Now the perennial variety is obviously different but in our area, it's all a by product of the peanut industry.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,010

    Default

    Yes. I've used it off and on since 2005. My childhood riding buddy Sue, who used to have a tall black TWH and now has QHs, raises it at Tebeau farms in GA. They have a website with all the info that you need about peanut hay. And they are great people too. It's the perennial peanut hay. It is NOT the same as peanut vines from which peanuts are picked.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Cairo, Georgia
    Posts
    2,413

    Default

    I've used the perinneal peanut hay for many years. It's the hay of choice for southern locally grown hay. Just fabulous. Will really put the weight on horses.
    You cannot feed the true peanut vines (called peanut hay) to horses. It's awful stuff.
    Producing horses with gentle minds & brilliant movement!
    www.whitfieldfarm.shutterfly.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2009
    Location
    a little north of Columbus GA
    Posts
    1,844

    Default

    I'm feeding perennial peanut this winter. The feed store got some sample bales in, I brought home a few flakes and Patrick eats it just as well as his Orchard/Alfalfa, and it's a couple dollars less a bale, so it works for me.

    I'm currently mixing it half and half with his O&A, but if that gets any more expensive he may just get the peanut! He was on straight alfalfa in Arizona, and AIUI the nutrition profile is similar.

    It looks funny and smells weird, but it seems to be good stuff. Lots of leaves in the bales I've been getting. (I've heard some people complain that it's mostly stems.)
    --
    Wendy
    ... and Patrick



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2000
    Location
    Coastal South Carolina :-)
    Posts
    3,948

    Default

    My old hay man grew a field of it for a couple of years to see if there was interest in my area. This has been 10+ years ago. No one knew anything about it and weren't buying it, so he brought me a few bales to try, and I loved it! Wound up buying all he had and was so disappointed when he didn't continue to grow it.

    Would love to find a source somewhere in SC.
    Crayola posse~ orange yellow, official pilot
    Proud owner of "High Flight" & "Shorty"



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2011
    Location
    Upatoi, GA
    Posts
    622

    Default

    Interesting! The local feed store was advertising it, but I was a bit skeptical and didn't try it yet. (wsmoak... I think I'm pretty close to you!)

    Sounds like it's worth a try.
    Founder & President, Dapplebay, Inc.
    Creative Director, Equestrian Culture Magazine
    Take us to print!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2005
    Location
    Pensacola, Florida
    Posts
    361

    Default

    I have fed peanut hay for years... not the perennial either. The guy I get mine form is very careful of how it is baled... not a lot of dirt. only thing about it I don't like as much is that it has some sticks in it. I feed it in piles out in a pasture, so any dust/dirt falls out or blows away. The horses love it and I get tons of compliments from my vet on their health and condition....they only get hay or grass, no grain.

    Nutritionally it is like feeding alfalfa.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,003

    Default

    People at our barn feed the P. Peanut hay, but it makes our pony colic when he gets a bit of it (there was a gap between the stalls and he was stealing from a neighbor). Took me a while to figure out what was happening. Once we got that to stop he straightened right out. I thought it was just an adjustment thing but he'd been doing it (and having tummy aches) for close to a month.

    They never have any problem with it, though - I don't know what it is with this particular horse. My other gelding tolerates the odd accidental mouthful just fine.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,010

    Default

    If you want to see a good video about perennial peanut hay, go to youtube and search "perennial peanut hay TBO farm."

    That's where my grammar school horse riding club drill team friend Sue Haupt Tebeau moved too when she got out of high school. When I came back home after retirement and heard about peanut hay, I found the website and called and bought some. And discovered my old friend was growing it.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2010
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    2,436

    Default

    My friend down in GA uses it. I had no idea it existed. She liked it for getting weight on her horse.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    5,185

    Default

    The perennial peanut is awesome hay. Almost as good as alfalfa. It's a bit of a pain to move and to feed due to the leaves breaking off, but nothing you can't handle with some care, a wheelbarrow, and feed tubs.

    Where have you found it, and for how much? Anywhere near me?



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 10, 2008
    Location
    Canton, GA
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    Default

    When I lived near Savannah, GA, and ran my own barn, I got the perennial peanut hay from a nearby grower. My horses loved it! Several would eat it before their grain. It also puts weight on a hard keeper. I highly recommend it.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2005
    Location
    Floral City , Fl.
    Posts
    4,225

    Default

    I have been using it for years. Our ponies LOVE it. I would buy the entire field of it every time it is cut if I needed it year round. Its just wonderful.
    Sandy
    www.sugarbrook.com
    hunter/jumper ponies



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2002
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
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    Default

    HB- I found some in Lake Charles listed on Craigslist. The price was almost 1/2 of what I'm paying for grass round bales, but no one ever answered my calls.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    5,185

    Default

    that sucks. maybe they sold it all that fast. where I am, it would be gone within minutes. our 40-ish lb bales of coastal are $10 now. it's good coastal, but that's insane. there are no rounds for horses available anywhere.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2007
    Posts
    717

    Default

    My horses love it. If I put a pile of timothy/alfalfa and a pile of peanut hay, they all will choose the PH first There isn't a good supply here and it's expensive, but I had a couple bales earlier this year and would have bought more if I could.



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