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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2011
    Location
    Zone IV
    Posts
    95

    Default Hot shoe vs. Cold shoe?

    Hello!
    I'm relatively new to horse ownership in the U.S. as I moved here from Europe and just bought a horse I am planning to event. The farrier came out for the new horse's first shoeing recently and "surprise, surprise", that was... cold shoeing. I actually had to google it when I got home as I'd never even heard of it - where I'm from everyone hot-shoe (apart from the 'McGiverish' occasional shoeing out on the trails...).
    What are your thoughts? Any preferences? Does your farrier hot shoe or cold shoe?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,217

    Default

    Hot! Farrier can do a lot more to steel with heat, so you have options with hot shoes or plain steel barstock for customizing creations if horse needs a specialty set of shoes.

    Not stuck with whatever shoes Farrier happens to have on the truck, if he only cold shoes. Cold shoeing really limits the offerings Farrier can offer.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2009
    Posts
    2,826

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goodhors View Post
    Hot! Farrier can do a lot more to steel with heat, so you have options with hot shoes or plain steel barstock for customizing creations if horse needs a specialty set of shoes.

    Not stuck with whatever shoes Farrier happens to have on the truck, if he only cold shoes. Cold shoeing really limits the offerings Farrier can offer.
    Cold shoeing doesn't mean the farrier doesn't heat the shoe. At least for the farrier I used to use, he just cooled the shoe off before putting it on the horse (and if needed would reheat, but he usually got it right the first time)
    Quote Originally Posted by pinecone View Post
    I can't decide if I should saddle up the drama llama, dust off the clue bat, or get out my soapbox.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
    Location
    Silvana, WA
    Posts
    937

    Default

    My farrier does both, depending on the needs of the horse.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,217

    Default

    Where I come from, hot shoeing means the Farrier uses a forge for heating the metal shoes for the horses. Could be just a couple minutes or a long time of running the forge.

    Cold shoeing means the Farrier does not have or use heat to shape the shoes before putting them on the equine. Has nothing to do with how they fit shoe onto the hoof itself.

    Though in my experience most hot shoers do fit the shoes to the hoof hot, some don't. Fine either way. If they use a forge to shape shoes, they are hot shoers for me.


    Quote Originally Posted by Big_Grey_hunter View Post
    Cold shoeing doesn't mean the farrier doesn't heat the shoe. At least for the farrier I used to use, he just cooled the shoe off before putting it on the horse (and if needed would reheat, but he usually got it right the first time)



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2010
    Posts
    204

    Default

    Ah, yes. I remember being shocked the first time I watched my horse get shod cold. I was 18 and up until then didn't even know such a thing existed. We'd just gone to FL from up north and the impression I got was that it was a Florida thing. (No idea if that's true or not of course, but every farrier we had or saw while there only did cold shoeing.)

    Now after moving west, the new farrier does hot shoeing, which now having had the chance to see both, I much prefer. The shoe just seems so much more snug on the foot. Done cold, I felt like I was always waiting for the shoes to slip somehow. They just didn't "seem" as secure to me. Heat also allows for so many customizations & corrective options. I don't think we'll be switching back to cold anytime soon.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2005
    Location
    Va
    Posts
    3,555

    Default

    Since my mare went back to steel shoes(from wide web aluminum-about 6+ years) hot shoeing. I agree that the shoes seem to stay tighter longer. My understanding is that by doing the hot shoeing, the hoof is melted down a teeny bit so it is level to the shoe.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 19, 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    54

    Default

    .

    Any real farrier will have a forge and be proficient in its use... But many opt not to use the forge on every horse in the field.

    While it's actually easier to shoe hot, it is possible to do most horses perfectly well cold with modern factory shoes and farrier anvils.

    Shoeing hot was a no-brainer back in the days when farriers worked in their own shops. But when we took our operations on the road, it got problematic. Not only is there the hazard of driving around with a hot forge in your rig (the hot doesn't stop just because you turn off the gas/blower), but we're working in environments we can't control. Hay, shavings, sawdust, liquid fuels in the work area. Kids, dogs, idiots running around. Untrained horses... Adding fire to the situation is sometimes a bad idea.

    Plus, no matter how careful we are, if the barn burns down after we leave, everyone is going to remember our big, spark and smoke blacksmith show, and never think about the kid who flicked a cigarette butt.

    Whenever practical, I like to do my forgework ahead of time in my shop.

    .



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2007
    Location
    Pen Argyl PA
    Posts
    3,745

    Default

    i don't mind either if the farrier is competent, i let him decide. Currently my horse has crappy brittle feet and my farrier is hot shoeing him. he also gets clips.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2007
    Posts
    3,928

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Millwater, RMF View Post
    .

    Any real farrier will have a forge and be proficient in its use... But many opt not to use the forge on every horse in the field.

    While it's actually easier to shoe hot, it is possible to do most horses perfectly well cold with modern factory shoes and farrier anvils.

    Shoeing hot was a no-brainer back in the days when farriers worked in their own shops. But when we took our operations on the road, it got problematic. Not only is there the hazard of driving around with a hot forge in your rig (the hot doesn't stop just because you turn off the gas/blower), but we're working in environments we can't control. Hay, shavings, sawdust, liquid fuels in the work area. Kids, dogs, idiots running around. Untrained horses... Adding fire to the situation is sometimes a bad idea.

    Plus, no matter how careful we are, if the barn burns down after we leave, everyone is going to remember our big, spark and smoke blacksmith show, and never think about the kid who flicked a cigarette butt.

    Whenever practical, I like to do my forgework ahead of time in my shop.

    .
    This about sums up my thoughts as well. A competent farrier really should be able to do both, but may opt to cold shoe in some (or even most) situations. As long as they do a good job it doesn't matter too much.



  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Millwater, RMF View Post
    .

    Any real farrier will have a forge and be proficient in its use... But many opt not to use the forge on every horse in the field.

    While it's actually easier to shoe hot, it is possible to do most horses perfectly well cold with modern factory shoes and farrier anvils.

    Shoeing hot was a no-brainer back in the days when farriers worked in their own shops. But when we took our operations on the road, it got problematic. Not only is there the hazard of driving around with a hot forge in your rig (the hot doesn't stop just because you turn off the gas/blower), but we're working in environments we can't control. Hay, shavings, sawdust, liquid fuels in the work area. Kids, dogs, idiots running around. Untrained horses... Adding fire to the situation is sometimes a bad idea.

    Plus, no matter how careful we are, if the barn burns down after we leave, everyone is going to remember our big, spark and smoke blacksmith show, and never think about the kid who flicked a cigarette butt.

    Whenever practical, I like to do my forgework ahead of time in my shop.

    .
    THIS!

    There were some barns this summer that refused to allow a forge. Especially the ones in certain cities with super tight burn bans...

    My most-est awesom-est farrier (used him for 17 years now!!) used to rarely use his forge. Now he says he's getting old, and using the forge means less wear on him for shaping a shoe.

    I only have one in shoes right now. But she's also in side clips and her shoes are tapped for studs.
    Aelfleah Farm, Scurry, Texas
    BLUE STAR Arabians and
    Arabian-influenced Sportponies
    www.aelfleahfarm.com



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