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  1. #1
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    Default A good turkey soup recipe?

    So while cleaning and nervously awaiting "THE game" (Va Tech vs. UVA), I'm boiling my bird carcass. What do you make with your stock? I thought maybe wild rice, carrotts, onion, celery, and a can of diced tomatoes, but its what I always do, so looking for some innovation.

    I was trying to think of how to add stuffing in some way...what do you think?



  2. #2
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    bell peppers, black olives, potatoes....

    saute the onions, then add the bell peppers, black olives and celery. Bring the stock to a boil, add the potatoes (or rice), carrots or anything you would normally cook in boiling water. The add your gently sauteed veggies (still crisp). Throw in a couple handfuls of frozen corn and some red pepper flakes.



  3. #3
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    Nov. 8, 2005
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    Default

    Sounds like what I'm planning to do with my duck carcass tomorrow after I've eaten the rest of the (lemon garlic crispy) duck, including all your ingredients assuming my celery is still edible, except for the tomatoes.

    What about a little cayenne instead of tomatoes with your turkey and maybe thickening it slightly?

    With the duck, I'm also thinking about substituting chopped scallions for the onion, adding soy sauce, maybe some MSG and thickening it at the end with a bit oc cornstarch, maybe at the end taking a little aside and sampling it after adding just a little vinegar to see if that might be a nice hot and sour flavor. If so, I may add vinegar to the rest and if not, I won't.
    If I knew what I were doing, why would I take lessons?

    "Things should be as simple as possible,
    but no simpler." - Einstein



  4. #4
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    Mar. 26, 2005
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    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
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    Default

    Now I'm hungry for turkey soup : )
    OP, IIWM, I'd stir in the stuffing at the end, it will thicken your soup and add the flavors of whatever you seasoned the stuffing with
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
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  5. #5
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    Nov. 8, 2005
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    Yes, a little stuffing will provide thickening. We had no stuffing because stuffing a duck is an open invitation to gall bladder problems. (A holiday goose, sans stuffing, landed my paternal grandmother in the hospital for gall bladder removal back when that was no slam dunk for success. But she was a tough old bird. ::grin:
    If I knew what I were doing, why would I take lessons?

    "Things should be as simple as possible,
    but no simpler." - Einstein



  6. #6
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    Jun. 23, 2006
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    Pennsylvania
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    Default

    For a different soup, you can make a pumpkin soup. I use 2 cups broth/stock per 1 cup of pumpkin and it makes a thick, creamy base. You can add veggies, left over meat shreds, and seasonings as you desire/have them. This year, I used garlic powder, paprika, peas, and a bit of parsley.



  7. #7
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    Jan. 30, 2007
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    Default

    The great Edna Staebler (if you're Canadian you won't need to google her ) had some great tips for making stock, including keeping your onion and carrot peelings and trimmings as you are making dinner...fantastic! Anthing not starchy can go in1
    Anyhow, here is my mom's turkey leekie soup recipe...I love sharing it because it is a special memory from our holidays together.
    So, here it is!
    Sauté together three leeks and two good-sized onions - with all of them, slice in half and then thinly slice into half rings. I sauté them on a fairly low heat until they are softened but not browned.
    Add in :
    • two carrots, sliced
    3 or four fist-sized potatoes, diced into bite sized pieces
    I also add in whatever seasonings I feel like - usually something green like Italian, or a bit of rosemary - you play with this part
    Cover the whole lot with equal parts of stock and water (or, if you like a richer soup, straight stock. I eyeball it, but probably about 8 cups of liquid.
    Let simmer gently till the vegetables are fairly cooked.
    Add in as much turkey (or chicken) as you like - I usually do about 4 cups.
    Stir in two cans of cream of whatever soup...cream of chicken, cream of mushroom, etc.
    Sometimes I will put in half a can of whole milk or half and half (I think you call it coffee cream in the US) to richen it as well. It is a thick soup more like a stew, great with warm bread
    Love ya, Mom
    Dee
    Founder of the I LOFF my worrywart TB clique!
    Official member of the "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique
    http://wilddiamondintherough.blogspot.ca/



  8. #8
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    You may also want to add some nice home made noodles to the soup. One egg per person, and add flour until the dough sticks together. Knead until elastic and allow to rest for 30 minutes or so. Divide dough in half for one egg and work from there until you get more practiced. Roll the dough as thinly as possible on a floured surface, turning and adding flour as needed. When the dough is 1/8" thick (max) or thinner, flour, cut in half, place floured surfaces together, flour and cut again, and place floured surfaces together. Roll up, starting at one of the straight edges. Cut the roll into slices oif the desired width, and toss the 'pinwheels' with flour. Add a small amount at a time to vigourously boiling salted water, and remove when they float - that is the built in doneness indicator. Add to soup and heat through.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

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  9. #9
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    Apr. 22, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by DeeThbd View Post
    The great Edna Staebler (if you're Canadian you won't need to google her ) had some great tips for making stock, including keeping your onion and carrot peelings and trimmings as you are making dinner...fantastic! Anthing not starchy can go in1
    Anyhow, here is my mom's turkey leekie soup recipe...I love sharing it because it is a special memory from our holidays together.
    So, here it is!
    Sauté together three leeks and two good-sized onions - with all of them, slice in half and then thinly slice into half rings. I sauté them on a fairly low heat until they are softened but not browned.
    Add in :
    • two carrots, sliced
    3 or four fist-sized potatoes, diced into bite sized pieces
    I also add in whatever seasonings I feel like - usually something green like Italian, or a bit of rosemary - you play with this part
    Cover the whole lot with equal parts of stock and water (or, if you like a richer soup, straight stock. I eyeball it, but probably about 8 cups of liquid.
    Let simmer gently till the vegetables are fairly cooked.
    Add in as much turkey (or chicken) as you like - I usually do about 4 cups.
    Stir in two cans of cream of whatever soup...cream of chicken, cream of mushroom, etc.
    Sometimes I will put in half a can of whole milk or half and half (I think you call it coffee cream in the US) to richen it as well. It is a thick soup more like a stew, great with warm bread
    Love ya, Mom
    Dee
    These are the recipes I love-those that come from before and with love I have 4 qts.of stock so I will definitely try your Mom's Turkey-Leekie soup Thanks, Dee, and thanks, Dee's Mom!



  10. #10
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    Apr. 22, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by sk_pacer View Post
    You may also want to add some nice home made noodles to the soup. One egg per person, and add flour until the dough sticks together. Knead until elastic and allow to rest for 30 minutes or so. Divide dough in half for one egg and work from there until you get more practiced. Roll the dough as thinly as possible on a floured surface, turning and adding flour as needed. When the dough is 1/8" thick (max) or thinner, flour, cut in half, place floured surfaces together, flour and cut again, and place floured surfaces together. Roll up, starting at one of the straight edges. Cut the roll into slices oif the desired width, and toss the 'pinwheels' with flour. Add a small amount at a time to vigourously boiling salted water, and remove when they float - that is the built in doneness indicator. Add to soup and heat through.
    Oooh, a recipe for homemade noodles! Many thanks-this is a must-try.



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by stryder View Post
    bell peppers, black olives, potatoes..
    Black olives as in, the "real"thing, kalamata salt-brined, or the canned kind? (the latter a guilty pleasure-I grew up on canned olives and still loff them, though I live in authentic-olive-Mecca)



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by lovey1121 View Post
    Oooh, a recipe for homemade noodles! Many thanks-this is a must-try.
    You're welcome, but please don't shoot me when you find out how hard the rolling is - kinda like rolling out an innertube, but well worth the effort.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by lovey1121 View Post
    Black olives as in, the "real"thing, kalamata salt-brined, or the canned kind? (the latter a guilty pleasure-I grew up on canned olives and still loff them, though I live in authentic-olive-Mecca)
    Simple us - plain ole canned.



  14. #14
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    Nov. 22, 2003
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    Virginia
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    Let the carcass boil a while, then take it out and remove all the meat that comes easily. You may want to save this; the soup/stew will be turkey-y enough. Cook sauteed onion with the carcass, when you think the carcass has pretty well "had it," remove it, pick off remaining meat and put it back in the pot. I add a lot of potatoes, cut up, all relevant leftovers: vegetables are GREAT (but leave mashed potatoes 'til the end because of their thickening properties) and LOTS of vegetables. I don't like rice or noodles; they tend to become mushy if you reheat the soup. Stuffing is good; if you don't have any left over (or don't want to waste it on soup/stew) put in some dried from the package. Will thicken, give that "Thanksgiving" flavor, and be appropriate spices for turkey.



  15. #15
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    I put some of the stuffing in with the carcass to make the stock, gives it lovely flavor! And our family tradition has ALWAYS been to make Avgolemono soup (Greek lemon and egg soup) the day after Thanksgiving and Christmas (or really whenever there's a bird carcass for good stock...). There are lots of recipe variations out there if you do a Google search, I usually use rice or orzo and then add shredded bits of leftover turkey when the soup is finished. Mmmm. It's different from any American soup I've made or eaten and I know a lot of people that don't care for it much, but it's so reminiscent of my childhood that I look forward to it every holiday.
    If it were easy, everybody would do it.

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  16. #16
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    Aug. 12, 2010
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    Oooh, very timely! I got 11 cups of stock from my mother's turkey carcass (everyone else laughs at me that I call "dibs" on the carcass every year, they wouldn't dream of taking that ugly thing home. It's all put up in 2c freezer bags and I've been trying to decide what to do with it.

    BTW, a crockpot makes it very easy to make poultry stock, I do it every time I bake a big chicken too. Carcass, the gizzard stuff in the little bag, random vegetables and herbs (always carrots and celery, onions), some spices...get put in the crockpot, covered with water and left on low while I sleep. Sometimes I put a lemon in there, that broth is good for colds and I label it separately. I use up not only the carcass, but any wilting vegetables from the fridge. It goes in quart size freezer bags in two cup portions, laid flat to freeze, so I can pack them in efficiently. I always have these in the freezer, so I never have to buy canned stock, which doesn't taste like much and has too much salt.



  17. #17
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    Dec. 11, 2006
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    Default Stock 911

    I simmered my carcass in 16 cups of water, half a bag of baby carrots, one heart of celery (large chunks), 2 onions with skins + skins of 4 other onions, parsley & peppercorns.

    I strained everything & put the stock in a container to cool.

    There's maybe 8 cups & it's solidified harder than gravy

    I've never had that happen before. How do I rescue it without changing the taste???
    I'm not arguing, I'm just explaining why I'm right
    Violence doesn't end violence. It extends it. Break the cycle.



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