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  1. #41
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    Dec. 19, 2009
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    Pennsylvania
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grataan View Post
    A dear kind-hearted woman who boards at my facility but in another of the boarding barns saw me measuring my horse's hematoma (sisters got in a pasture argument and little sister lost.) She asked "oh does your horse have hives too?" and I said "no, she's just got a hematoma from a fight with her sister" and she then informed me that it wasn't a hematoma (it was like 9cm X 15 cm) it was actually a "giant hive" and I shouldn't be self treating, I should TALK TO MY VET (lol!) and have him give me some fungus shampoo because hives are caused by fungus.

    She wandered off before I could formulate a "nice" response and my tech who was holding the horse burst into raucous laughter.

    It was some months later before she actually realized I was a DVM and in fact I was the same DVM who vaccinated her horse and floated his teeth.


    Best story on this thread!



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2005
    Location
    Washington State
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    1,580

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    This time last year my little mini got sick and I had to get the vet out. He said it was sand colic (she pooped pure sand while I was waiting for him), treated her, and told me to get some Sand Clear or equivalent for her. My vet said sand colic isn't much of an issue in this area so I went to the farm store hoping they carried it. I couldn't find the product so I asked.

    Me: I'm looking for psyllium, Sand Clear or something like it.

    Farm Store Clerk: Why?

    Me: My horse has sand colic and the vet told me to give that on her.

    FSC: Just give her castor oil.

    Me: That's not going to push the sand out. I'd rather do as the vet says.

    FSC: (Going to the same aisle I where I was just looking and not finding anything) What does she have again?

    Me: SAND colic. She has SAND in her belly.

    FSC: Oh, that's bad. Your vet is just trying to rip you off though. Just give your horse cloves.

    Me: (Trying really hard not to throttle this gal ) I guess you don't have it and I'd rather follow my vet's advice. I trust him. I'll try another store.

    Went back a week later and saw, not in the supplement aisle where I had been looking but in the bandage and first aid aisle, THREE different brands of psyllium. I told a different clerk (one that I'd known for a long time) about the incident and she pleaded with me to talk with the manager. Seems this gal was calling herself a horse expert and giving all sorts of unsolicited advice to people. She no longer works there.
    Crayola Posse - Pine Green
    Whinnie Pine (June 4, 1977 - April 29, 2008)
    Autumn Caper (April 27, 1989 - May 24, 2015)




  3. #43
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2011
    Location
    Lisbon, Portugal
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    1,451

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    Quote Originally Posted by katarine View Post
    I hauled two horses to the vet to get their Coggins pulled. I unloaded them and tied them to the side of the trailer to snooze while we waited. A woman approached me and asked me if I fenced them in at home, or did they stay close to home by choice. I replied that of course they are fenced in, I'd rather they not get hit on the road, and fences make sure they don't go tear up someone's yard (Who has to explain such things????)

    She looked sad, eyes downcast, then proceeded to tell me with sorrow in her voice that if they loved me they'd stay close to me, you know, like the Native American's horses did, they didn't need fences.

    With that, she tugged on her dog's leash, and turned away.
    WTF?? Seriously?
    I guess her dog doesn't love her very much then...



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2010
    Location
    Orygun
    Posts
    2,947

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    I worked in a feed store several years back. One of the first things the manger told me, don't give out vet advice, even if you're 100% sure how to fix. It had more to do with liability than anything. So, I kept quiet.

    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy's Mom View Post
    This time last year my little mini got sick and I had to get the vet out. He said it was sand colic (she pooped pure sand while I was waiting for him), treated her, and told me to get some Sand Clear or equivalent for her. My vet said sand colic isn't much of an issue in this area so I went to the farm store hoping they carried it. I couldn't find the product so I asked.

    Me: I'm looking for psyllium, Sand Clear or something like it.

    Farm Store Clerk: Why?

    Me: My horse has sand colic and the vet told me to give that on her.

    FSC: Just give her castor oil.

    Me: That's not going to push the sand out. I'd rather do as the vet says.

    FSC: (Going to the same aisle I where I was just looking and not finding anything) What does she have again?

    Me: SAND colic. She has SAND in her belly.

    FSC: Oh, that's bad. Your vet is just trying to rip you off though. Just give your horse cloves.

    Me: (Trying really hard not to throttle this gal ) I guess you don't have it and I'd rather follow my vet's advice. I trust him. I'll try another store.

    Went back a week later and saw, not in the supplement aisle where I had been looking but in the bandage and first aid aisle, THREE different brands of psyllium. I told a different clerk (one that I'd known for a long time) about the incident and she pleaded with me to talk with the manager. Seems this gal was calling herself a horse expert and giving all sorts of unsolicited advice to people. She no longer works there.
    GR24's Musing #19 - Save the tatas!!



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2011
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    Lisbon, Portugal
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyzteke View Post
    Actually, I just remember some REALLY bad advice I tried to give to a woman regarding her show horse.

    I had observed her & the horse during their class and I could clearly see her mount was extremely off, especially at the canter.

    Right after the class was over I tried to go over and tell the poor gal how lame her horse really was.

    Luckily, my friends stopped me.

    It turns out that is the way a Western Pleasure horse is SUPPOSED to move.

    But in my book it still counts as one of the weirdest thing I've ever seen a horse do....
    LMFAO!!!

    Ah, good old crab canter... The first time I saw a video of it (I'm Portuguese so we don't have western shows here) I was like why are they trying to make it look like the horses are all lame???



  6. #46
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    Nov. 13, 2011
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    Lisbon, Portugal
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    Well, I don't own a horse yet - I'll be stuck to riding other people's horses for a while in this economy - but I've heard people say some pretty stupid things about horses.

    "Don't stand behind a horse, you'll get kicked." OH, really? And how is it that horses get their tails groomed everyday then?

    "If you give a horse plenty of treats, they will love you and not try to thrown you down." This is from some of the people that take lessons in the same riding school as me. *sigh*

    "It's cruel to use a whip on a horse." I'm not even going to comment on that one...

    "Stallions are dangerous" Well, they are, if you let them get away with anything. Otherwise, they're no more dangerous than any gelding or mare.



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2005
    Location
    Washington State
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    1,580

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    Quote Originally Posted by goneriding24 View Post
    I worked in a feed store several years back. One of the first things the manger told me, don't give out vet advice, even if you're 100% sure how to fix. It had more to do with liability than anything. So, I kept quiet.
    That is one of the reasons I was so ticked off. I know better than to do what the ditz was suggesting but what if some poor new horse owner or idiot like my neighbor was given that advice? My neighbor probably would have gone home and shoved cloves in her horses mouth!
    Crayola Posse - Pine Green
    Whinnie Pine (June 4, 1977 - April 29, 2008)
    Autumn Caper (April 27, 1989 - May 24, 2015)




  8. #48
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2008
    Location
    SE, PA
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    1,585

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    Quote Originally Posted by ILuvmyButtercups View Post
    I got that everywhere there were any stallions around. The track, the breeding farms, at shows when I showed stallions. Stupid men, they had to be the big man, "wimin shouldn't be around the big studs because their periods were like the heat in horses". Are you kidding me???? Is anyone that backwards anymore? Maybe there is something to schools having comprehensive sex ed now, I don't know.... haven't heard this ignorant comment in a long time.
    I got the opposite!! I used to hotwalk at DE Park and was told that I was no good - "got them all quiet and such...."
    Our horses know our secrets; we braid our tears into their manes and whisper our hopes into their ears.



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2009
    Location
    Montreal, Qc
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    Quote Originally Posted by Niennor View Post
    Don't stand behind a horse, you'll get kicked." OH, really? And how is it that horses get their tails groomed everyday then?.
    How do you think people get kicked?

    You don't need to be directly behind a horse to brush its tail.
    And yes, standing behind a horse is not the safest place to be.

    You shouldn't stand behind a young or unknown horse or whenever the horse is in a new situation and shows signs of stress/incomfort.

    And if you ride others' horses, I suggest you follow whatever rules they have, including not standing behind their horse if they told you so.



  10. #50
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Yes, standing behind horses, especially unknown horses = not a good idea. I have a couple who have never, never kicked out behind. But, I don't let my guard down either.
    Join the Clinton 2016 campaign...Hillary For America. https://www.hillaryclinton.com/



  11. #51
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    Feb. 22, 2007
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    Yeah, I also always stand to the side of the horse to groom the tail and teach my students to do the same. It's a lot safer.

    Only time I stand directly behind a horse is when I'm braiding the tail for hunter pleasure classes, because I can't seem to get it straight otherwise. And then I do it as quickly as possible.



  12. #52
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    Jan. 24, 2000
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    Out of the loop
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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy's Mom View Post
    Me: I'm looking for psyllium, Sand Clear or something like it.

    Farm Store Clerk: Why?
    And this is why I refuse to engage in conversations with most retail salespeople/clerks. My answer to the question "why" in situations like the one Murphy's Mom described is "Because I wish to puchase it." Repeat as needed.
    Equinox Equine Massage

    In the depth of winter, I finally learned that there was in me invincible summer.
    -Albert Camus



  13. #53
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    May. 2, 2006
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    Chicagoland
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    Quote Originally Posted by Niennor View Post
    "Don't stand behind a horse, you'll get kicked." OH, really? And how is it that horses get their tails groomed everyday then?
    Well, that is one good way to get kicked. My horse is not a kicker at all, and I don't stand directly behind him to do anything. For brushing or picking out his tail I stand to the side.

    And "Don't stand behind the horse" is one of the first things I tell the non-horse people who come to visit the horses!



  14. #54
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    Jun. 18, 2011
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    "Nothing good comes out of the back end of a horse" was my grandpa's favorite saying. Yeah, sometimes you have to spend a little time back there to get something done. There really is no reason to tempt fate though.

    "Get in, get the job done, get out"-another one of my grandpa's favorite sayings. Appropriate for working around the back ends of big animals and many other aspects of life.

    A little pearl of wisdom I gleaned from a teenage *horse trainer* that got kicked out of the barn I board at shortly after..."You NEVER pick a horse's feet because it messes up their bacteria".

    Guess what her horse had? Thrush. Wanna know why she got kicked out of the barn? Huge screaming match with the BO because she was sick of telling the girl to treat the horse for thrush.



  15. #55
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    Sep. 5, 2011
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    When someone does this stuff to me, I simply say with my biggest smile & my most sarcastic condescending tone - "Oh, thank you SOOO much" - & walk away.



  16. #56
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    Jun. 18, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    When someone does this stuff to me, I simply say with my biggest smile & my most sarcastic condescending tone - "Oh, thank you SOOO much" - & walk away.
    I prefer a very long blank stare, as if waiting for a further explanation. Stare at someone without saying a word long enough and they will eventually feel uncomfortable and walk away. As an added bonus they remember you as that creepy person that just stared at them when they so graciously tried to help you out, and will hesitate to give advice next time they see you.



  17. #57
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2010
    Location
    East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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    155

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    All this is the reason when people, strangers or acquaintances, find out I like horses, ride, etc. and try to talk to me about it, I pass. I just try to avoid conversations. Bad? Maybe. But saves me headaches and heartache.

    I had an ex get mad at me for being upset b/c some girl he knew rode her horse down to the local yokal store. We said hi, and I was aghast at the state of the horse's hooves. INSANE cracks(Like cloven hooves, people), and crazy me for thinking that if someone has an animal they should take care of it.
    Tu deviens responsable pour toujours de ce que tu as apprivoisé.
    You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed
    Le Petit Prince



  18. #58
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    Feb. 9, 2009
    Posts
    654

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    I finally worked up the nerve to say "Excuse me, I think there's something wrong with your horse..." and explained how the trot looked really, really off to me and I was afraid their horse was lame. I'm sure I blushed right down to my toes when they started laughing and explained what a "Tennessee Walking Horse" is supposed to look like...
    Years ago, we leased an ex-Big Lick Walker for endurance riding, with a lot of scarring from being blistered on her forelegs. She was sound, though. At the ride check-ins, however, we had more than one vet tell us that he couldn't tell if she was lame or not because she didn't trot. These individuals would just ask us if she was sound to ride, and she always was.

    She did have a tendency to fall asleep toward the end of the ride on hot summer afternoons, often with her rider doing the same! Usually both woke up when she stumbled on something. Obviously she was a horse to ride for completion, not the top ten.
    "I couldn't fix your brakes, so I made your horn louder."



  19. #59
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    Aug. 13, 2010
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    30

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    One day I had ridden out on a long trail ride with my mare and we didn't get back in time for her late afternoon feeding. It was hot, so I hosed her down in the wash area and went and got her hay from her stall to feed to her as she dried. I noticed that the hay seemed especially dusty, so, I hosed the hay down to keep the dust from irritating her lungs.

    My horse was happily munching away on the wet hay when some strange woman, whom I had never seen before and didn't belong at the stable as far as I knew, came rushing over to me screaming like a banshee and trying to get the hay away from my horse because the wet hay would kill her. I tried reasoning with her, I tried being polite; nothing worked. The woman would not listen, would not calm down, would not stop screaming and yelling. I ended up having to walk away and take my horse and her wet feed (in a tub) to her stall on the other side of the stable to get this woman to leave me alone.

    Nightmare.



  20. #60
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    Jul. 1, 2011
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    Was at the barn one day and one of the ponies was acting colicky. They decided to lightly lunge it to see if things would start moving and he would be able to poop.
    Well the young girl was having a hard time getting the horse out on a circle and moving, so this guy decided to help. This guy is a middle aged man who just started riding 3 years ago (mostly only in the winter as his daughter should ride the horse in summer when she was home for school) thinks he knows more about horses than I do (riding 13 years) and gets all his horse care info from books written 100 years ago.
    Well he tells her to pick up the lunge whip to get the pony going. As soon as the girl picks up the lunge whip the horse bolts forward and starts whipping around the circle in a crazed panic. The guy keeps telling the kid to keep holding the whip as the sick horse flys around the circle. Finally the horse settles down into a fast trot and I was like phew at least that's over. Guy then tells the girl to put down the whip. Pet the horse and change direction. He then told her to PICK BACK UP THE WHIP! The poor sick pony immediately bolts off into another crazed run around the circle! I was just about to tell the young girl that now is NOT the time to be training your poor sick horse how to not be freaked out by a lunge whip when finally they stopped and just walked the pony.

    There also was a dad at my barn who thinks he knows a lot about horses but really knows nothing. I was rehabbing my horse from an injury and was doing walk trot for 40 minutes a day. I finish my ride and the dad is at the arena door watching his kid lesson. He asks me 'is that it?' I was like 'yup that's it' then he says to me in a condescending tone 'what happened to riding for an hour?' pretty much calling me a lazy f-ing person who didn't care or try with my riding. I was so pissed. I was like 'ya if I wanted to cripple my horse I could ride him for an hour but since I don't want to have a crippled horse I won't.'



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