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  1. #1
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    Dec. 10, 2005
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    Tundra
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    Default All Inclusive Board/Training Board

    For those of you that do all inclusive board (full service, show care, training, lessons) how did you calculate it?
    www.millcreekfarm.net
    **RIP Kickstart aka Char 12/2/2009**



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2009
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    1,386

    Default

    Most all inclusive boarding and training don't include show fees. Show fees are usually on top of the monthly payment.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2001
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    Member of both the Southern California and Michigan clique - currently residing in Grand Rapids, MI
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    Default

    There are some barns that offer two options, all inclusive (with showing) and a la carte. I want to say that Jenni Martin in California offers something like this. One of my friends rode with her and LOVED it. I think a program like that makes sense for owners who show a lot and trainers... both of them have a better sense of what's coming in/going out. Obviously splits were on top, and I can't remember how grooming worked.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
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    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
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    11,666

    Default

    Last time I rode in a full training board situation, we paid a single fee each month which included normal board (stall/feed/turnout/blanketing) plus daily grooming, tacking/untacking, laundry, & tack care in addition to lessons and pro rides. The horses were kept in absolutely immaculate condition - manes always pulled, whiskers clipped, etc. We normally got three lessons a week and they would do whatever other riding (pro rides, conditioning, etc) that were necessary if the rider didn't come out that day or whatever. Show fees were additional.
    Last edited by Lucassb; Nov. 17, 2011 at 12:10 AM.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2011
    Posts
    130

    Default

    Can someone help me explain as I am looking at facilities that offer one price training/board/lesson structure. Does a flat rate work when there is only one trainer and said trainer may be off to shows three out of four weeks in a month? How do these trainers make up the lost time and out of pocket client $$$. I would love to be off at shows, but....am anadult re-rider not quite with the sound seat to show.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2009
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ballisticgirl View Post
    Can someone help me explain as I am looking at facilities that offer one price training/board/lesson structure. Does a flat rate work when there is only one trainer and said trainer may be off to shows three out of four weeks in a month? How do these trainers make up the lost time and out of pocket client $$$. I would love to be off at shows, but....am anadult re-rider not quite with the sound seat to show.
    Is there an assistant trainer? Or perhaps an off-site trainer who gets brought in when the head trainer is off at shows?

    If not, this might not be the place for you. Some places are really set up for people who go on the road with the trainer. If you pay for things you aren't getting because you aren't going to show, you won't be happy.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
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    9,363

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ballisticgirl View Post
    Can someone help me explain as I am looking at facilities that offer one price training/board/lesson structure. Does a flat rate work when there is only one trainer and said trainer may be off to shows three out of four weeks in a month? How do these trainers make up the lost time and out of pocket client $$$. I would love to be off at shows, but....am anadult re-rider not quite with the sound seat to show.
    They don't.
    They have programs where the horses are on the road a week and home a week, the end. If that isn't your schedule there is no point being in that program.

    FWIW, when last I checked (2006) Rob Bielefeld to cite one example charged $3k a month, inclusive of shows. He didn't charge any extra to ride or do day care at a show. But clients of course paid trailering/stall/entries etc.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2009
    Location
    Northeast Ohio, where mud rules your world...
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    1,366

    Default

    I have a training barn with boarders as well, about 50-50 training horses to boarded horses. Full care board- one set monthly rate regardless of whether horse is board only or in training. All horses get the same care and amenities. Includes all the this's and that's.

    Training is an additional fee. I have a Condition rate $200 and a Finish rate $250. Condition is for horses that are broke to do what the owner is asking me to do but need continuous tune ups or exercise to keep fit. Finish training is for green horses being intro'd to a new discipline or for older horses changing careers. I budget for 20 rides per month for Condition and 25 rides for Finish training which is $10 per ride. That is how I work around the show schedule. Most times it works out for all horses involved but occasionally a client would get some credit for me being gone longer than usual and not there to do all the workouts. If I know in advance that I will not be able to do all the rides, I speak with owner before the billing cycle and we agree on my per ride charge of $10 for how ever many rides I can fit into that month.

    Show fees are a seperate charge from home Training fees.

    For me, billing my training horses is like fitting together a puzzle. I don't give any big breaks on board bills for a horse that is gone with us at a show. That board bill holds your stall at home and the food your horse would have eaten at home is going to the show with him. My show fees are super cheap and on a tiered scale to make the extras of shows not double up on an already paid board bill. I charge a day fee for the horse being off the farm for a show. It's $50 a day if the client is absent or choses not to help out at shows. $20 if the client pitches in. Our junior riders are required to pitch in. This means helping pick show stalls, feed water, groom bath help with set up and tear down. Nominal fee per day per show but we don't have paid grooms at shows so it's an economical way for clients to show without paying ridiculous money. This fee also covers any practice work for the horse at the show such as riding or exercising the horse outside of a class. Then I have a coaching fee per horse per class regarless of whether I show the horse or client shows the horse. If your horse shows one halter class with me or you, it's $10. If you and your horse show eight junior exhibitor riding classes over a weekend, it's $20 per class for the first four, then $10 for the remaining. Driving class coaching fees are $50 per. More work, more risk, more fee. I don't charge a coach fee if I am unable to be on the rail during a clients ride because I am showing another horse or what not. I don't charge for Championship classes that don't have an additional entry fee either. And my junior riders can earn $25 per day towards their coaching and day fees. If they groom at a show with me that they are not competing at all, they earn $25 per day for that show. That credit can be put towards a show that they are competing at on a later date. Win Win! Then we have a simple braiding fee but if clients can show braid, they can do it themselves. So our clients pay for EXACTLY what they and their horse needed and participated in at a show. It's a great system for my working stiff clients and they all love how fair it is. You want to help, help and save yourself $ while being involved with the elbow grease patrol. You want to sit out and enjoy a relaxing show, no prob, the only fee that changes is the day fee covering the 24 hour care and responsibility of your horse. And last but not least, there is a milage fee for each show. Every client knows well before we even send in entries what their approx cost per show is gonna be. It's so nice to not have surprises in the bill after a show.
    ...don't sh** where you eat...



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2008
    Posts
    5,406

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by winfieldfarm View Post
    I have a training barn with boarders as well, about 50-50 training horses to boarded horses. Full care board- one set monthly rate regardless of whether horse is board only or in training. All horses get the same care and amenities. Includes all the this's and that's.

    Training is an additional fee. I have a Condition rate $200 and a Finish rate $250. Condition is for horses that are broke to do what the owner is asking me to do but need continuous tune ups or exercise to keep fit. Finish training is for green horses being intro'd to a new discipline or for older horses changing careers. I budget for 20 rides per month for Condition and 25 rides for Finish training which is $10 per ride. That is how I work around the show schedule. Most times it works out for all horses involved but occasionally a client would get some credit for me being gone longer than usual and not there to do all the workouts. If I know in advance that I will not be able to do all the rides, I speak with owner before the billing cycle and we agree on my per ride charge of $10 for how ever many rides I can fit into that month.

    Show fees are a seperate charge from home Training fees.

    For me, billing my training horses is like fitting together a puzzle. I don't give any big breaks on board bills for a horse that is gone with us at a show. That board bill holds your stall at home and the food your horse would have eaten at home is going to the show with him. My show fees are super cheap and on a tiered scale to make the extras of shows not double up on an already paid board bill. I charge a day fee for the horse being off the farm for a show. It's $50 a day if the client is absent or choses not to help out at shows. $20 if the client pitches in. Our junior riders are required to pitch in. This means helping pick show stalls, feed water, groom bath help with set up and tear down. Nominal fee per day per show but we don't have paid grooms at shows so it's an economical way for clients to show without paying ridiculous money. This fee also covers any practice work for the horse at the show such as riding or exercising the horse outside of a class. Then I have a coaching fee per horse per class regarless of whether I show the horse or client shows the horse. If your horse shows one halter class with me or you, it's $10. If you and your horse show eight junior exhibitor riding classes over a weekend, it's $20 per class for the first four, then $10 for the remaining. Driving class coaching fees are $50 per. More work, more risk, more fee. I don't charge a coach fee if I am unable to be on the rail during a clients ride because I am showing another horse or what not. I don't charge for Championship classes that don't have an additional entry fee either. And my junior riders can earn $25 per day towards their coaching and day fees. If they groom at a show with me that they are not competing at all, they earn $25 per day for that show. That credit can be put towards a show that they are competing at on a later date. Win Win! Then we have a simple braiding fee but if clients can show braid, they can do it themselves. So our clients pay for EXACTLY what they and their horse needed and participated in at a show. It's a great system for my working stiff clients and they all love how fair it is. You want to help, help and save yourself $ while being involved with the elbow grease patrol. You want to sit out and enjoy a relaxing show, no prob, the only fee that changes is the day fee covering the 24 hour care and responsibility of your horse. And last but not least, there is a milage fee for each show. Every client knows well before we even send in entries what their approx cost per show is gonna be. It's so nice to not have surprises in the bill after a show.
    This is a wonderful system and I'm sure you have many dedicated clients



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2009
    Location
    Northeast Ohio, where mud rules your world...
    Posts
    1,366

    Default

    So many of the farms I compete against have a flat fee for different levels of A shows. But it didn't seem fair to charge a halter horse who shows once the same as a junior rider or performance horse who may do several classes. Plus, for our system, the fees are the same regardless of the level of competition. It doesn't matter if it's the first show of the season or Nationals. The only variable that will change from show to show are milage and day fee. We travel farther, we stay longer, you pay more. But day fees, coaching, braiding - all the same for any show! It all works out to everyone's benefit. The work is the same whether we are in state or out of state, first show or last show of the season. So it helps that clients can go all the way to national competition, show more shows due to the cost effectiveness of the system, and each feels they are fairly charged.

    We don't stall in the front fancy aisle, not a big enough barn to justify. Our barn is a one for all, all for one atmosphere when it comes to getting through a horse show. Parents bring food and drink when possible. We have an RV that can feed everyone even if they don't stay in the RV to sleep. All chip in for food expenses for that if they want to eat. We are more like a pack of gypsies than a group of clients individual unto themselves when we roll into a show. We go on the cheap where necessary so that clients can spend the money on the important stuff like more show experience, quality tack and show clothes, medical needs for horses to perform sound, etc....
    ...don't sh** where you eat...



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2007
    Posts
    97

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by winfieldfarm View Post
    I have a training barn with boarders as well, about 50-50 training horses to boarded horses. Full care board- one set monthly rate regardless of whether horse is board only or in training. All horses get the same care and amenities. Includes all the this's and that's.

    Training is an additional fee. I have a Condition rate $200 and a Finish rate $250. Condition is for horses that are broke to do what the owner is asking me to do but need continuous tune ups or exercise to keep fit. Finish training is for green horses being intro'd to a new discipline or for older horses changing careers. I budget for 20 rides per month for Condition and 25 rides for Finish training which is $10 per ride. That is how I work around the show schedule. Most times it works out for all horses involved but occasionally a client would get some credit for me being gone longer than usual and not there to do all the workouts. If I know in advance that I will not be able to do all the rides, I speak with owner before the billing cycle and we agree on my per ride charge of $10 for how ever many rides I can fit into that month.

    Show fees are a seperate charge from home Training fees.

    For me, billing my training horses is like fitting together a puzzle. I don't give any big breaks on board bills for a horse that is gone with us at a show. That board bill holds your stall at home and the food your horse would have eaten at home is going to the show with him. My show fees are super cheap and on a tiered scale to make the extras of shows not double up on an already paid board bill. I charge a day fee for the horse being off the farm for a show. It's $50 a day if the client is absent or choses not to help out at shows. $20 if the client pitches in. Our junior riders are required to pitch in. This means helping pick show stalls, feed water, groom bath help with set up and tear down. Nominal fee per day per show but we don't have paid grooms at shows so it's an economical way for clients to show without paying ridiculous money. This fee also covers any practice work for the horse at the show such as riding or exercising the horse outside of a class. Then I have a coaching fee per horse per class regarless of whether I show the horse or client shows the horse. If your horse shows one halter class with me or you, it's $10. If you and your horse show eight junior exhibitor riding classes over a weekend, it's $20 per class for the first four, then $10 for the remaining. Driving class coaching fees are $50 per. More work, more risk, more fee. I don't charge a coach fee if I am unable to be on the rail during a clients ride because I am showing another horse or what not. I don't charge for Championship classes that don't have an additional entry fee either. And my junior riders can earn $25 per day towards their coaching and day fees. If they groom at a show with me that they are not competing at all, they earn $25 per day for that show. That credit can be put towards a show that they are competing at on a later date. Win Win! Then we have a simple braiding fee but if clients can show braid, they can do it themselves. So our clients pay for EXACTLY what they and their horse needed and participated in at a show. It's a great system for my working stiff clients and they all love how fair it is. You want to help, help and save yourself $ while being involved with the elbow grease patrol. You want to sit out and enjoy a relaxing show, no prob, the only fee that changes is the day fee covering the 24 hour care and responsibility of your horse. And last but not least, there is a milage fee for each show. Every client knows well before we even send in entries what their approx cost per show is gonna be. It's so nice to not have surprises in the bill after a show.
    I find this very smart, in some ways. From an economical standpoint, this is ingenious. Although as amateurs, we found it very difficult as juniors to get to the venue and allow ourselves to be pampered while friends were essentially working for us. Therefore, this system eliminated all young riders that truely wanted to relax. Vice versa, a young client would pay their fee and still end up mindlessly working.



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