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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2005
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    488

    Default Anyone had LASIK vision correction done?

    Was it worth it? How soon could you ride or go to the barn? Thanks!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
    Posts
    8,701

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    Yes! 8 years ago. I stayed away from the barn for a few days, and didn't ride for a couple weeks.

    Best thing I ever did, although I was in my early 30s and knew I would have to do it again. Just in the last 6 months or so I find I need to wear glasses again when I drive at night



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2005
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
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    1,973

    Default

    I had it done about 5 years ago. Wish I'd done it a lot sooner, as I now see better than I ever did with contacts.

    IIRC, I was out of the barn for about a week to avoid dust contamination. I was able to drive the same day as the procedure.
    "Is it ignorance or apathy? Hey, I don't know and I don't care." ~Jimmy Buffett



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2008
    Location
    UK
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    836

    Default

    I have and it was the best thing ever. I had mine done just as Lasik was becoming an option - 11 years ago now. I had both eyes done at the same time and went from not being able to read the top letter of an eye chart with my left eye - to being able to read the bottom line. My right eye had a little less improving to do (I could read the third line prior to the surgery).

    I can still read the bottom line of an eye chart - it really was life changing. It was a little wierd at first as they make one eye very slightly long sighted and one very slightly short sighted. As I had never been anywhere close to long sighted it felt weird at first - but overall it was wonderful. What was a shame was how quickly you cease to appreciate it. It just becomes so utterly normal to be able to see.

    With regard to the barn; well I lived and worked at a barn so I was back in action straight away. I did though try not to muck out or groom as it is dust that can be bad. The great thing about this treatment though is that your tears basically seal the flap, so as long as you keep your eyes very lubricated, either with natural tears or drops - you should be OK.

    I read this the other day and it brought it all back - that feeling of wonder at REALLY being able to see. And being happier - so many people commented on how much happier I looked. It wasn't necessarily that I was happier, just that my brow wasn't permanently slightly furrowed as I tried to make fuzzy shapes into something recognisable.

    (Taken from The Times in the UK which is behind a paywall):

    A zap of the eye laser and I feel like I’m on LSD – for life

    After 28 years India Knight has bid contact lenses goodbye. She never knew trees, flowers, even bricks would look so vibrant with 20/20 vision
    India Knight Published: 23 October 2011


    I t’s pretty odd to go to bed one night as one’s normal temperamental self and wake up the next morning as Fotherington-Thomas, the pathetic weed from the Molesworth books who skips winsomely about going, “Hullo clouds, hullo sky”, making everyone sick with disgust. I’ve been him for nearly a fortnight now, and the tendency shows no sign of abating. I have basically had a personality transplant.

    I used to be very short-sighted — no use to man or beast without my contact lenses. I eschewed spectacles on grounds of vanity. When I absolutely had to wear them — if I had conjunctivitis, say — I stomped about in a rage, knowing that in my big black frames I looked like a cross between Buddy Holly and Heston Blumenthal.

    There was nothing I could do about it other than embrace quasi-blindness. But embracing quasi-blindness was not a realistic option: to give you the gist, with a prescription of –6 and –4, I couldn’t see the face of someone sitting opposite me at lunch without my lenses or specs — I could make out the outline and the rest would be a blur.

    Sometimes a spouse or boyfriend would try to cheer me up by saying: “But I like you in your glasses.” This would always be followed by the sort of chortle you turn into a cough, and a look in my direction, as though I were one of those disabled dogs that have wheels replacing their back legs: sweet, but comical to the point of hysteria. It got on my nerves.

    As did my contacts. I wore them all day, every day, from the age of 17 onwards. I am now 45. That’s nearly three decades of shoving expensive bits of plastic in your eyes every morning. They had gone from ridiculously uncomfortable to barely there in the time I’d used them, but the suspicion that they weren’t doing me any good grew every day, especially when I had an eye test and my optician would say, in a loaded sort of way, that it might be an idea to have a break from the lenses every now and then. Which I couldn’t do, of course, because of the Heston-Buddy issue.

    So, on October 10, I had laser eye surgery. I did not do this lightly. I approached the gathering of information as though I were sitting on some earth-shattering scoop that needed forensic levels of checking. I spoke to doctors, surgeons, people who’d had it done and even someone who’d made a documentary on the subject. I was all over the internet. I tried to remember the basics of the eye and how sight works with the help of school textbooks. What my research boiled down to was this: the surgery can be life-changingly effective, or it can go a bit wrong, and the difference between the two is, unsurprisingly, expertise.

    In the end I went where everyone told me to go, to Professor David Gartry at Moorfields eye hospital in London. I was in the operating room for 15 minutes; there was no pain; and I was back online checking my emails a few hours later.

    This is the point at which my life changed. I had imagined my new sight would be the same as my old sight with contact lenses or glasses, because it was impossible for me to imagine anything else: as far as I’d known, that was perfect sight. When people went, “Wow, look at the sunset”, I assumed they were seeing the sunset I was seeing with my lenses in.

    Not the case, it turns out. My contact lenses were giving me the best sight contact lenses could give me. My surgery has given me official 20/20 vision — and I am, according to my most recent checkup, heading for “RAF vision” (the sight keeps improving in the weeks after surgery). This is not the vision I used to have; it is brand new. It is like having new eyes.

    Not only do I not need lenses any more, but every single thing looks different. It is like suddenly occupying a different planet — a recognisable one, but one that, in its wealth of incredible detail, is wholly new to me.

    I wandered around my local park for two hours last week with my mouth slightly open, staring at things and touching them The other day I was looking at the trees out of my kitchen window and was so astonished by how beautiful they were that I went straight out to touch the leaves, like a mad person. Obviously, I knew trees were beautiful before. But not like this.

    The absolute, exquisite perfection of each individual leaf! The little veins! The variety of incredible colour! And the blades of grass, so insanely green, all visible individually! And the birds — the iridescence of magpie feathers, for example, each one of them sharply outlined. And so it goes on ... It’s like someone’s upgraded me to HD.

    I wandered around my local park for two hours last Thursday with my mouth slightly open, staring at things and touching them.

    I remind myself of someone who’s taken LSD, except it’s continuous — the amazement every morning as I open my eyes and remember I can see not just the alarm clock but the brushstrokes on the painting at the other end of the bedroom.

    I open the blinds and stare at the view. I marvel at the light, because it looks different. I make sure I’m outside for the sunset and sit there like a hippie, going, “Wow,” over and over again, even if the sunset isn’t doing much.

    Yesterday someone who’s also had the surgery told me to make sure I had a really good look at brickwork, so I went and found a large wall. I could honestly have examined this wall for two hours, except it was a busy street and I was getting in people’s way with my weird staring. The perfection! The craftsmanship! The dazzlingly beautiful geometry! I’m also fixated by small architectural details on buildings, curlicues and whorls that were there all along but that somehow leap out at me in a hyper-real new way.

    Even at home — the extreme yellowness of the yolk of my poached egg (and the speckledy beauty of the egg’s shell); the stunning colours and textures of the pumpkins in the greengrocer’s. And fish! I went to buy a couple of lemon soles two days ago and ended up open-mouthed (again) at the spectacular exquisiteness of the fish counter.

    This has had a marked effect on my everyday life. I’m much slower than I used to be because I feel the need to look at things in a leisurely manner — but I have been in an ecstatically good mood every day. The world is incredibly beautiful.

    I know that is not an original thing to say, and it’s not as though I thought the world was ugly before, but I suppose I’d just got too used to it and taken it for granted, as one does. What the past two weeks have taught me is that there is no situation so miserable that it can’t be fixed by a quick stare at something.

    I feel blessed. I realise this sounds both hyperbolic and sort of bizarrely evangelical — count your blessings, O children of the Lord, for you have eyes — but it is how I feel, and I hope to keep feeling this way for a long time. I’m told that the wonderment abates but never really ceases.

    So far, my new eyes have operated only in the known, domestic context of London. I can’t wait to see a whole field or a beach or a dry-stone wall or the night sky somewhere remote. It’ll be mind-bending. But then so are my children’s faces and the leaves at the bottom of the teapot, the weave of the runner on the stairs, the paint on the walls, the piercingly orange lentils I can see in a glass jar as I type.

    I said I was Fotherington-Thomas, but now I realise I am actually the monstrously syrupy Madeline Bassett, one of PG Wodehouse’s more hilariously emetic creations, who, in Right Ho, Jeeves, tells Bertie Wooster that “the stars are God’s daisy chain”. Yes, they are. Personality transplant doesn’t even begin to cover it.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2009
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    My husband had LASIK in April. My brother is an opthamologist and did the surgery when we visited his family in Hawaii. The recovery time was very quick. My husband said it's the best thing he has ever done. If anyone wants a great surgeon in Hawaii, check out www.oahulasik.com



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 1999
    Location
    Ohio: Charter Member - COTH Hockey Clique & COTH Buffy Clique
    Posts
    9,143

    Default

    BEST. THING. EVER!

    I had mine done 5 years ago. I had sold my trailer (downsizing) and used that money to pay for it. I was VERY careful for about a month about going to the barn. Stayed away for a week or so then went with my goggles. I've had glasses since I was in 2nd grade (8 years old... so that would be 1977). I LOVE not having lenses anymore. I'm a bit more sensitive to headlights at night, but otherwise am fine. Would HIGHLY recommend it. But go in and make sure you're comfortable with your surgeon. I paid a little more to go to a guy that I kind of knew (was in an adventure racing club with his nephew and have partied at his lakehouse) rather than going to another place.
    ************
    "Of course it's hard. It's supposed to be hard. It's the Hard that makes it great."

    "Get up... Get out... Get Drunk. Repeat as needed." -- Spike



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,612

    Default

    Yep, had it done in 2004 when I was something like 20/800 in both eyes. Without glasses I couldn't see anything, just light with watercolor blurs. Just now need glasses again (I'm about 20/60 in both eyes). It was the best thing ever and I am totally bummed about needing glasses again, but it is still nothing like it was before -- I can find my glasses when I take them off now.

    I stayed out of the barn for a week and saw night vision halos for about 6 months.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    13,780

    Default

    Yup, last April. It's the second best thing I ever did for my bod, following breast reduction surgery. I could see my vision had improved when I walked out of the procedure room.

    The surgeon wasn't concerned about my riding right away but he was concerned about a possible fungus infection from barn dust. I minimized barn time for 2 weeks or so and washed my eyes out after i had been in the barn.

    I had it done at LasikPlus. They offer a procedure where they correct one eye for distance and the other for closeup but didn't recommend it in my case because it can interfere with depth perception and balance so I do need reading glasses.

    If anyone is interested in having it done I have a coupon for 10% off that can pass out. I do not get a rebate for doing this. PM me with your email address
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2004
    Location
    Charlotte
    Posts
    1,642

    Default

    I've had it done twice. First time was about 8 years ago, I had both eyes done. The results were incredible, and the surgery was a piece of cake!

    About 2 years later, I had to have a "touch up" on my right eye. That procedure was pretty rough (I won't go into detail on here, but PM me if you want to know what's different the second time around!). The good news is that since the touch up, my vision has been perfect, so I hope I won't ever have to go through it again. I would have to think really hard as to if I'd go through it again.

    Best of luck to you- it really is a good thing!!!
    "Life is too short to be a slave to the whims of others." -- RugBug, COTH



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2007
    Location
    Monroe, WA USA
    Posts
    229

    Default

    I had Lasik 14 years ago and still see great today. I can't remember how long I stayed away from the barn, but I don't think it was very long (a few days to a week maybe?). I was very careful about not getting dust in my eyes even after that time.

    I was about 20/200 in both eyes and ended up being 20/20 and 20/30. It's still amazing to be able to read the time on my alarm clock (needed glasses for that before). Driving without glasses is great although I now need some for driving at night.

    It is definitely one of the best things I've done.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2004
    Posts
    4,344

    Default

    Mr. Chai had it done about 12 years ago. It was incredible. He had 20 -200 vision since the age of 12 and hated his glasses.

    He followed the doctor's orders to the letter and I can still remember watching his reaction the next morning when he took off the bandages and could see snow on individual branches in our yard. It was really worth it. He still doesn't need glasses for distance, although he recently started needing them to read.

    I would highly recommend it, but make sure you really follow the doctor's orders to keep the bandages on and rest afterward.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2005
    Posts
    1,658

    Default

    Ditto. 2000. Best thing ever. Went from blind to seeing with out anything. A miracle. Get the most experienced doc you can find.
    ********
    There is no snooze button on a cat that wants breakfast.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2010
    Posts
    6,610

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    Would you recommend it if your vision isn't THAT bad? I have about 20/120 and need glasses for distance. I don't see nearly as well at night. I don't need reading glasses, though being almost 50. Would I still be able to read? How much did it cost? Did anyone do it where you take the money out pretax in one of those things (forgot the name) where you can take out health care costs not covered by my atrociously expensive healthcare?



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
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    13,780

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beentheredonethat View Post
    Would you recommend it if your vision isn't THAT bad? I have about 20/120 and need glasses for distance. I don't see nearly as well at night. I don't need reading glasses, though being almost 50. Would I still be able to read? How much did it cost? Did anyone do it where you take the money out pretax in one of those things (forgot the name) where you can take out health care costs not covered by my atrociously expensive healthcare?
    Mine was $3100 or $3400 after assorted discounts, rebates and insurance. I think the undiscounted price is around $5K. My insurance covered a small amount and I did use my FSA. If you are thinking of having it done the initial screening appointment in my case was free. Then if you don't have enough in your FSA this you can adjust the FSA and do it in Jan.

    If you want to use a Lasik Plus center PM me wth your email address and I will email you a coupon.

    I'm not pushing them and I don't get a referal kickback from them

    ETA:You don't want to commit $5000 to your FSA and finc you can't have the procedure, FSA is use it or lose it and you can't use it on most OTC stuff
    Last edited by carolprudm; Nov. 12, 2011 at 11:55 AM. Reason: add
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



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