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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2010
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    684

    Default Collateral ligament injury in RF?

    Vet diagnosed collateral ligament injury in my horse's RF. The horse has been out in pasture and was supposed to trimmed every 4 weeks. Her hoof conformation is bad and she gets contracted heels. They didn't do it, they did it every 8 weeks. Her front feet, esp the right, is now oval.

    She does grow high heels. That's why I wanted her feet done every 4 weeks. With that she can keep the heels open much better. SHe's a 10yo qh with cone feet. They get smaller as they grow. RF is also slightly clubby. She has always been barefoot.

    I brought the horse home yesterday and had the vet and trimmer over today. Vet recommended stall rest and 20-30 mins of walking every day. Trimmer did her feet.

    Xrays are clean but do show a lot of sidebone. Vet didn't think that was causing the lameness. Vet did a block to the right front heel and that stopped the lameness.

    THe horse is mostly an easy going trail horse, no heavy riding. SHe did gain a lot of weight while out in pasture, though a lot of that has come off in the last couple of months.

    Has anyone had anything similar? How long did it take to heal? I'm hoping once the heels are opened up again and she's back on the 4 week schedule she'll feel better.

    This is the first time she's been lame. Any advice or similar circumstances?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2007
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    North San Diego County, CA
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    Default

    My girl had a collateral lig tear in her RF between P2 and P3 (I think), diagnosed with an MRI. Completely recovered now but it was 2 months hand walk 30 min, 2 months mounted walk 30 min, 2 months trot, and finally 2 months light canter. Some time off in all that due to weather.

    Avoid walking on any surfaces or making quick turns that might create lateral movement. Shod in eggbars first two months.

    I was told that it would be a quick action like jumping or playing in turnout that caused it, not shoeing. So, if yours is shoeing, maybe a faster recovery and not as serious an injury?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2009
    Location
    Apex, NC
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    677

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    What symptoms did your horse present with. Mine has been gimpy mainly in corners, fairly decent on straights, looks sound out in pasture when doing anything (W/T/C) and usually works out of gimpiness within 20 minutes of work and working correctly. This kind of injury has been on my mind for my injury, so curious as how other horses present?



  4. #4
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    Oct. 14, 2000
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    Now In the Sandhills, NC mostly
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    Default

    I don't think you can diagnose a collateral without an MRI, can you? It's a serious, often career-ending injury. I'd want to be sure about it.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2010
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    684

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    Quote Originally Posted by 3Spots View Post
    My girl had a collateral lig tear in her RF between P2 and P3 (I think), diagnosed with an MRI. Completely recovered now but it was 2 months hand walk 30 min, 2 months mounted walk 30 min, 2 months trot, and finally 2 months light canter. Some time off in all that due to weather.

    Avoid walking on any surfaces or making quick turns that might create lateral movement. Shod in eggbars first two months.

    I was told that it would be a quick action like jumping or playing in turnout that caused it, not shoeing. So, if yours is shoeing, maybe a faster recovery and not as serious an injury?
    My horse is barefoot. She's supposed to be trimmed every 4 weeks. I had her out in pasture and requested they trim her every 4 weeks. They trimmed every 8 weeks, which caused her heels to become very contracted. Her heels grow higher and smaller when they grow out, which is why she needs to be trimmed frequently. The vet thinks maybe she stepped funny on something, or maybe it's so contracted everything is squished inside. Not sure.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.GMan View Post
    What symptoms did your horse present with. Mine has been gimpy mainly in corners, fairly decent on straights, looks sound out in pasture when doing anything (W/T/C) and usually works out of gimpiness within 20 minutes of work and working correctly. This kind of injury has been on my mind for my injury, so curious as how other horses present?


    Lame at the trot, esp on circles. Actually I haven't seen her trot straight to know if she's lame straight too. She doesn't work out of it. When I pulled her out of pasture, I had no idea she was lame. She's 2 hours away and has been on strangles quarantine since Aug. Another horse in the pasture got sick, so the whole thing was off limits to visitors. I pulled her out when the quarantine was up and put her in training to get her back under saddle. When I saw her on the second day of training, she was off then. The trainer said she'd work out of it, that it was just muscle sore from being in pasture. Grr. It didn't clear up and I contacted a vet.


    Quote Originally Posted by FairWeather View Post
    I don't think you can diagnose a collateral without an MRI, can you? It's a serious, often career-ending injury. I'd want to be sure about it.
    The horse isn't insured and I don't have 2k for an MRI. The vet came to that conclusion because when we numbed the area, the lameness went away, and the xrays don't show anything else.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2005
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    2,185

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    My gelding was in full time training and came up lame only at the trot. Had a lameness exam and the diagnosis was collateral ligament strain due to an unbalanced foot. He was put on full stall rest for a month with 20 minutes on the hot walker each day. He is back in training after a month of stall rest and a month of coming back VERY slowly. He is getting shod every 4 weeks by a new farrier. He is back and doing very well and 100 % sound
    RIP Sucha Smooth Whiskey
    May 17,2004 - March 29, 2010
    RIP San Lena Peppy
    May 3, 1991 - March 11, 2010



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2005
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    Northern Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by FairWeather View Post
    I don't think you can diagnose a collateral without an MRI, can you? It's a serious, often career-ending injury. I'd want to be sure about it.
    An experienced vet can via ultrasound.



  8. #8
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    Dec. 5, 2005
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    I forgot to add that the most important factors in the healing equation are rest and A GOOD FARRIER. Get your horse to the best one that you can afford. And then borrow some $$$ and find a better one. Shoeing is that important when dealing with collateral ligaments in the foot.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
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    Alberta
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    Ask your vet if theraputic ultrasound might help. Personal use ultrasound machines aren't that pricey, and do work. Might be something to consider.



  10. #10
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    Jun. 30, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herbie19 View Post
    I forgot to add that the most important factors in the healing equation are rest and A GOOD FARRIER. Get your horse to the best one that you can afford. And then borrow some $$$ and find a better one. Shoeing is that important when dealing with collateral ligaments in the foot.
    AMEN!! This is the reason my horse strained his collateral ligament in the first place I got lucky and dodged a bullet that he didn't tear something. A 3 1/2 year old pasture pet because of a bad farrier would have sucked big time!!! I learned a BIG lesson........
    RIP Sucha Smooth Whiskey
    May 17,2004 - March 29, 2010
    RIP San Lena Peppy
    May 3, 1991 - March 11, 2010



  11. #11
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    Dec. 5, 2005
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    Northern Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHT View Post
    Ask your vet if theraputic ultrasound might help. Personal use ultrasound machines aren't that pricey, and do work. Might be something to consider.
    I own an Iron Foot made by Respond Systems and love it. It is magnetic therapy but I do believe they also sell/rent various lasers.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2002
    Location
    Maryland
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    in addition to shoeing changes and eggbar shoes, I started with stall rest, time and shock wave when my mare had a small tear in her collateral ligament. This did not work for some reason and so then I did PRP/bone marrow injections and stall rest and that did the trick
    I brought her back super slow with walking in straight lines for slowly increasing amounts of time and then slowly added trotting and cantering in increasing amounts of time
    she was deemed able to go back to prior work but I was worried about xc jumping her at prelim heights and so she became a dressage horse and has a new home
    Mr Gman- mine presented with a tiny (and I mean tiny) spot of fluid along the tendons betw fetlock and knee and her just being NQR. She was never lame but her canter just did not feel like it normally did.
    I was told that sometimes it can be diagnosed with ultrasound and sometimes you need an MRI to see (I needed an MRI because the US was inconclusive)
    There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man.(Churchill)



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2009
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    I would not have the horse barefoot. The reason is the mechanics required to ease stress in the ligament especially when turning can be greatly improved with a full roller motion shoe.(Clog, PLR, Morrison roller, T shoe, or any other "ringbone" type shoe) barefoot can not offer the needed mechanics.
    Also IMO egg bars or any other shoe without a full rolled edge does not help much.
    Egg bars MAY help a few of these but only if the injury in the lkigament is on its caudal (rear) portion. In collateral ligament injuries to the FRONT part of the ligament an egg bar would be exactly the wrong thing to do. Therefore. without MRI the best "shotgun" shoeing approach is usually the full roller type shoe on an internally balanced hoof. (use XRays if necessary in the hoof prepration). and rest. And I see lots of these come back to full soundness with the right treatment early enough. But barefoot and the uneven footing of a pasture are in my opinion not the right thing to do.
    Patty Stiller CNBBT,CNBF,CLS, CE
    Natural Balance Certified Lameness Specialist ,instructor.
    www.hoofcareonline.com



  14. #14

    Default

    I was given a gelding four years ago because he was diagnosed with CLI in both front hooves. He was shod in special shoes, rested for 6 months and received shock wave treatments before I was given him. His ultrasound showed improvement, but he did not totally heal. After four years he is totally sound for trail riding, but is still a little off when trotting in a tight circle.



  15. #15
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    Dec. 5, 2005
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    Northern Virginia
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Patty Stiller View Post
    I would not have the horse barefoot. The reason is the mechanics required to ease stress in the ligament especially when turning can be greatly improved with a full roller motion shoe.(Clog, PLR, Morrison roller, T shoe, or any other "ringbone" type shoe) barefoot can not offer the needed mechanics.
    Also IMO egg bars or any other shoe without a full rolled edge does not help much.
    Egg bars MAY help a few of these but only if the injury in the lkigament is on its caudal (rear) portion. In collateral ligament injuries to the FRONT part of the ligament an egg bar would be exactly the wrong thing to do. Therefore. without MRI the best "shotgun" shoeing approach is usually the full roller type shoe on an internally balanced hoof. (use XRays if necessary in the hoof prepration). and rest. And I see lots of these come back to full soundness with the right treatment early enough. But barefoot and the uneven footing of a pasture are in my opinion not the right thing to do.
    110% agree!



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