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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2006
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    Default Can a dog that has killed outdoor cats ever live with an indoor cat?

    Just curious if its even a possibility.

    My brother (who lives at home) has a huge lab/hound mix that has killed two of our outdoor cats when they came into the backyard. He will also sit at the front door and bark aggressively if he can see the cats out front.

    I am moving into an apartment in January and would love to get a pet. I have grown up around animals and I hate not being around them. I would love a dog but with going to school and living in a small apartment it would not be ideal. A cat would be perfect for me.

    My only issue is that when I come home for the summer (or if for some reason I can no longer keep the animal) the cat would need to be able to live at my parents house.

    I am pretty sure I already know the answer, it would not be safe for the cat, but I was just curious if anyone had experience with a dog being aggressive to outdoor cats but fine with indoor cats.
    -Lindsey



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2009
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    Default

    Some people do say that their dogs will chase outdoor cats but have learned not to chase indoor cats. I, however, wouldn't risk it. If the cat runs, it will likely incite the dog's prey drive and it could be bad.



  3. #3
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Default

    Depends on the dog, and probably in a huge part on the owner.

    My cat chasing Dal learned to accept cats eventually (took a bruiser Tom to teach her that lesson), my late sister's Jack Russel, confirmed cat killer is now happily sleeping with my mom's cats.
    But the transition was not pretty, we thought we had to find him a new home!

    He was allowed to chase anything on my sister's farm when she was alive....


    So, if your family is on board to teach the dog to not kill cats, it could work.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  4. #4
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    Oct. 26, 2003
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    1,897

    Default

    It could work, but it's such a huge risk. Could you board the cat when you went home to visit?



  5. #5
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    Dec. 21, 2009
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    740

    Default

    What about locking the cat in your room while you're home?



  6. #6
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    Apr. 22, 2011
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ~DressageJunkie~ View Post

    I am pretty sure I already know the answer, it would not be safe for the cat, but I was just curious if anyone had experience with a dog being aggressive to outdoor cats but fine with indoor cats.
    A twice- confirmed cat killer is a cat killer. You know the answer. Why would you put your dear cat through the trauma of even setting foot in such a dangerous environment?



  7. #7
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    Jan. 10, 2006
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    Kansas
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    Default

    I guess I know logically it would not work. I probably shouldn't be browsing cats for adoption, I would love to give them all a home
    -Lindsey



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Posts
    2,079

    Default

    My dogs accept our cat as one of the family. He strolls around outside with them and walks on them in the house, rubs all over them...no problem. Any other cat? Forget it...fair game.

    It can work but....if it didn't it sure would be a miserable situation.
    "look deep into his pedigree. Look for the name of a one-of-a-kind horse who lends to his kin a fierce tenacity, a will of iron, a look of eagles. Look & know that Slew is still very much with us."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
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    Default

    I wouldn't chance it. Is there a way to isolate the cat? When I'm at my parents for longer than a weekend (Thanksgiving, Christmas) my cats live in the mud room as Mom's allergic and they can't come in the house.) If you're only there part of the time, you could make it work, but it would mean being VERY vigilant, and your brother keeping the dog well-disciplined.



  10. #10
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    May. 3, 2008
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    Default

    If you're worried, why not foster a cat when you are at school. It would be a great situation for a foster cat because you probably have more free time than you would if you were working. I know the shelters around here are always looking and are greatful for any time people can give.



  11. #11
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    Feb. 22, 2007
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    Default

    I think it depends on why the dog killed the cats. For example, I have a dog that will attack my neighbor's chickens if they come onto my property, but was fine with them when she lived there (used to belong to them) and fine with my chickens. The only thing we can figure is that it's a territorial thing.

    But generally dogs kill smaller animals like that because of their prey drives, and that's not a good situation to have a cat in. I would consider it if the dog were always closely supervised around the cat, and they were separated when no one was around, but even then I'd have to think pretty hard about whether that was a risk I'd take.

    I think the suggestion of fostering a cat is a good one.
    Last edited by CosMonster; Oct. 12, 2011 at 02:24 PM.



  12. #12
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    Jun. 10, 2001
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    nj
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    Default i agree with lovey1121

    i have a cat killer dog. learned of her habit the hard way. broke my heart.
    don't go there!
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  13. #13
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    Feb. 7, 2007
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    Default

    I don't think I would risk it, but my dog will chase anything that runs outside - especially cats. But our cat rules our house inside.



  14. #14
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    Apr. 22, 2011
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    I feel for you, DJ. I know how hard it is NOT to have a furface greet you when you come home. Unfortunately I also know firshand what its like having a dog kill your beloved kitty But I think that unless bro and dog move out, or you get a dog that in no way resembles a kitteh, you must abstain.

    Maybe a dog? HMMMMM???



  15. #15
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    Jan. 10, 2006
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    Kansas
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    Default

    I might actually look into fostering. The problem would be finding a rescue close to the school, also I am still under 21 and some foster programs have age limit.

    I have a dog at my parents place but she is a Golden Retriever and would not do well in a small 1 bed apartment or without her other doggie siblings. My parents also said they aren't to sure if they could part with her (even though every time I call home I hear "come get your dang dog, she's driving us crazy") I thought about adopting a dog, but I don't want to commit to a dog while living in an apartment with no backyard, plus it would also have to live at my parents during the summer and we already have 4 dogs at home.

    She would be a great addition to college though because she loves to help me study!
    http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fb...type=3&theater

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    -Lindsey



  16. #16
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    Aug. 8, 2001
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    up the hill from the little river (that floods alarmingly often)
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    Default

    It could work, but it would require a very high level of vigilance and probably a basket muzzle for the dog. Unless the dog is either leashed/muzzled or crated when cat is around, I would not do it. It only takes a second and that's it for kitty.

    I have a dog here who's killed a rabbit in the yard, but he's never looked twice at our cat, and I kept an eagle eye on him for a few weeks immediately after the rabbit incident. Thankfully cat is not a shrinking violet, and she can just stare and twitch her tail, and that's enough to get both dogs backing away nervously.

    There are really only very specific circumstances under which I'd try to keep a cat and a cat-killing dog together, and I'm not sure I'd ever allow them to be in a situation where they're alone together.

    I don't allow our dogs now to be alone with the cat, and neither of them have ever shown any inclination toward making her a snack; she has a room upstairs with a small cat tree where she stays when we're not at home.

    Some shelters do fostering too; you may be able to get around any age limit if you volunteer at the shelter/rescue and they get to know you and know you're trustworthy and would make a good foster. But I think fostering is a fantastic idea.
    Full-time bargain hunter.



  17. #17
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    Sep. 23, 2010
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    Default

    I would not take the chance. Fostering a cat when you're at school might be an option, if you don't become too attached to give the cat/s back!



  18. #18
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    Default

    They can but it depends on the dog. That one doesn't sound like a good prospect to me. And big enough to take out a door if he knew a cat was on the other side. I wouldn't risk it. School seems like forever but it really doesn't take that long.
    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



  19. #19
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    Apr. 6, 2010
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    San Diego, CA
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    Default

    Our cats are fine with our dogs, strange cats are fair game unless they want to play. Took me FOREVER to get to that point with one dog though. We used my aunt's HUGE Savannah cat for the intro to not chasing cats. Worked beautifully and when it came time for us to get the two we have now we kept them separate and did little mini introductions. Now with the cats almost the same size as the dogs we don't have any incidents.
    Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
    Originally Posted by alicen:
    What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2011
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    66

    Default

    My mom's dog killed two outdoor cats, but never bothered her indoor one. I still don't know if I would chance it though.



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