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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2006
    Location
    Massachussetts
    Posts
    550

    Default Chewing - what stops it?

    My Big Dumb TB has decided, in his new barn with lovely new people I would like to be friends with, that he's going to take up chewing on the wood in his stall.

    What have you used to treat the wood to prevent it? No-Chew Spray, Rap-Last spray, Hydrophane Cribox? Anything else?

    Said horse is outside 8 hours a day and ridden frequently, on a well-balanced diet, on an ulcer treatment, and is in perfect health aside from the usual mishaps and typical crummy feet. He's just being a jerk and my barn manager would really appreciate him not destroying the stall.
    OTTB owner.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,925

    Default

    No Chew, McNasty & Rap Last sprays did absolutely nothing for my TB. He actually licked the McNasty off the wood. Tried liquid and bar soap rubbed on the wood (didn't work either).

    Cribox is the only thing that's worked for us. I've been using it for over 10 years, with success, on the same horse.

    ETA: Make sure you wear gloves when applying the Cribox. I've found it works best if you put a very thin layer on the wood with your fingers and kind of rub it into the wood. It's difficult to remove from under your fingernails (and your horse's hair).



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,499

    Default

    I had good luck with laundry ammonia spraying it on wood. However it doesn't last long and needs to be reapplied often. It is VERY cheap, doesn't seem to discolor the wood or get on the horse.

    May sound silly, but can you get some green wood logs, willow, or other safe woods, and leave them in his paddock or field? You want green wood logs, they prefer it. Horses will USUALLY chew the logs instead of the harder or nasty tasting barn wood, to satisfy that "browse cue" that goes off in the fall. Call some firewood suppliers if you don't have access to trees yourself. Tell them you want softwood, willow if possible and purchase some pieces to let the horse try out.

    An alternative would be a brush pile in his pasture, which he could spend time chewing on. I cleaned fence one fall and made a terrific brush pile that just never got burned. By spring the horses had gnawed it down to a couple small logs. Brush was mostly Honeysuckle and some smaller Ash trees, no nasty stuff like Walnut.

    Some friends put out the willow logs which their several horses TOTALLY consumed, but it saved the barn stalls from being eaten! They just kept putting out more willow logs until horses quit chewing on them in spring. Some brain trigger with shorter days, colder temps, and horses get the strong urge to chew woody things. Guess they are getting ready for hard times of winter!

    You can work with it, provide chew toys or repair stalls and fences.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    9,036

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Whyevernot55 View Post
    He's just being a jerk and my barn manager would really appreciate him not destroying the stall.
    Is your barn manager supplying him with free choice hay to nibble on instead of the walls?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    2,202

    Default

    With 16 hours in a stall I would chew wood too. Get him some stall toys to abuse instead of his stall. They have those treat things too. Can you possibly move him to a stall with an adjoining paddock??



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2010
    Location
    Bozeman, MT
    Posts
    611

    Default

    Mine are out at least 12 hours a day (weather permitting - and sometime even when the weather is bad and I don't want to deal with them). I have found that the more 'out time' they have, combined with free choice, good quality hay is the best antidote. That said, Cribox works wonders, but it's nasty. One horse got it all over his mane...GROSS. It's the only effective anti-chew I've found, which is funny because it has a faint smell of apples.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
    Posts
    16,865

    Default

    Small mesh hay nets can easily be hung Safely and provide hours of nibbling on forage instead of stall wood
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- Being negative only makes a difficult journey more difficult. You may be given a cactus, but you don't have to sit on it.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2006
    Posts
    192

    Default

    Havent't tried it yet, but a friend recommended rubbing Irish Spring bar soap (yes, it HAS to be Irish Spring) all over the wood surfaces. She said it work wonders. Nothing has stopped hte beaver on my farm. FWIW, mine has access to being out on pasture 24/7 or in his stall and he will still opt to come in, stand around and chew.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2005
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    15,278

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by candyappy View Post
    With 16 hours in a stall I would chew wood too. Get him some stall toys to abuse instead of his stall. They have those treat things too. Can you possibly move him to a stall with an adjoining paddock??
    echo this - and check that he has enough hay to last him all day
    if hes 16.2 he need plenty of hay- not little servings

    and try haylage nets you can get them for horse size which take 1/2 a coventional bale the holes are smaller
    if however feeding haylage then you need to be aware you dont feed as much as hay as its very fattening
    hide chopped up vegs and fruit in stable, or hang and drill holes in vegs and fruit and hang it up on rather via baling twine



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2006
    Posts
    257

    Default

    My demolition man only stopped chewing when I applied Shur Hoof to the wood. Only warning is it's sticky & messy until it dries.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2007
    Posts
    3,578

    Default

    Can you install angle iron or corner iron. Those metal bars that go on stall doors, the fronts, etc.

    My horses didn't chew either, and we moved to my new barn, I didn't have the angle iron put on the stall fronts. Of course, first night to my horror they had fun chomping all night on that lovely pine. Angle iron put on immediately. No problems.

    Pine is really tasty to horses, and I doubt hay or toys will deter them.
    save lives...spay/neuter/geld



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2008
    Location
    Outside Ocala FL - Horse Capital of the World
    Posts
    6,190

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bearskin View Post
    Havent't tried it yet, but a friend recommended rubbing Irish Spring bar soap (yes, it HAS to be Irish Spring) all over the wood surfaces. She said it work wonders. Nothing has stopped hte beaver on my farm. FWIW, mine has access to being out on pasture 24/7 or in his stall and he will still opt to come in, stand around and chew.
    It doesn't have to be Irish Spring, but it must have a strong smell, so almost any deodorant bar soap will do, and yes, I have used it very successfully. I have also used WD-40 in a pinch, that works too.
    There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2009
    Posts
    90

    Default

    My horse is out 24/7 with hay and pasture but he is still a bit of a beaver.

    I have had great success with cribox. I actually heat it in the microwave (top off, 30 seconds at a time) until it is a liquid and then I paint it on with a cheapo paint brush that I can throw out after use. The container lasts a lot longer, especially if you have to do large areas (ie. the entire fence line).

    No chew spray is better for bandages and blankets. My best (albeit unrelated) suggestion for no chew is I spray my turnouts in no chew and let dry in the sun before use. Keeps my horse's turnout buddy from shredding his blanket.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    13,260

    Default Chewing- What stops it?

    Lockjaw.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
    Location
    Gainesville, FL
    Posts
    5,985

    Default

    I knew one mare that only stopped with some really really hot sauce painted on the wood. The first time she bit it was hilarious!
    I love cats, I love every single cat....
    So anyway I am a cat lover
    And I love to run.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2011
    Posts
    37

    Default

    When i put my fat mare on a diet she decided to eat the plank fencing.
    <pitiful starving 5 ton mare>

    I think Its gunna take some old yellow hay from 2001, a ration balancer and bunch of electric to get the weight off and still have fence.
    good luck with the cribox or Irish Spring..

    I would try the irish spring ...but shes Irish and so would probably eat that too. lol.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2000
    Location
    Heaven - Rappahannock County, Virginia
    Posts
    1,881

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beethoven View Post
    I knew one mare that only stopped with some really really hot sauce painted on the wood. The first time she bit it was hilarious!
    mine are out 24x7 but they will still occasionally work the barn and fencing under the overhang. good old texas pete, mixed 50/50 with water, applied with a spray bottle, works.
    * trying hard to be the person that my horses think i am



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
    Posts
    3,980

    Default

    I don't have a chewer, and I have a metal barn AND yoke doors so when horses hang their heads they cannot reach their barn - right? NOT....

    I happend to own an 18 hand horse that can scrape his teeth on the wall - I tried sprays that work on wraps like McNasty but that didn't work. I use vasoline and sprinkle cayane pepper on it. He hasn't touched it in years. My hubby thinks the metal scrape marks look better than the red pepper and vasoline.

    My other horse chews on rubber buckets and I rub vasoline under the rim and put the cayane pepper on the vasoline and that works for him too.

    Sorry your horse is being a goober!
    Train like you have never won and show like you have never lost!!!



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