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  1. #1

    Default botulism

    I strongly urge anyone who is feeding any bagged haylage to have their horse vaccinated for botulism.

    My pony almost died last year from Lucern Hi Fi. It was misdiagnosed but I got a heads up out of the box specialist to come to him in a blizzard and make the call.

    A lab test confirmed the product strong positive for botulism toxins A and B.

    Apparently this is near impossible to prove...but I have indeed a lab positive result...so this is why people think their horse laid down and died from something else...and at that point who is going to spend the money for any testing or autopsy! spend the money..get vaccinated...and for the most part you can rule out botulism. I can never feed that kind of product again regardless....I know of an older horse that laid down and would not get up. They assumed he just went down and died of old age but he was being fed the haylage. Now they wonder what killed him. GET VACCINATED if you are going to feed any bagged haylage. It is not worth the risk...and the vaccines are not that expensive when u consider the alternative.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
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    Default

    We had a horse die from botulism last year. A dead animal in a compressed bale can cause exposure. Of course by the time you see symptoms it is often quite late because it's the botulinum toxin that gets you, not the clostridium bacterium itself.

    Fella gets his third shot today.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    There is Botulism C from carcasses, and there is Botulism B from the soil and the haylage type things. The vaccine is only Type B.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
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    Default

    So there are different strains of Clostridium botulinum?

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    36,085

    Default

    Quite a few strains - A, B, C (7 types even here), D, and I think an E and/or F?

    A, B, and C are most common. A and B are usually the type found in spoiled hay/haylage, either from molding/etc, or from ground contact and an anaerobic environment.

    C is from the decaying carcasses.

    I don't remember what the other types are, and not sure what the differences are among the 7 types of C

    The vaccine is just for Type B
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2006
    Location
    Warren County, NJ
    Posts
    3,621

    Default

    This is a nice article summing it up.

    http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/...o_botulism.htm

    I agree on vaccinating against botulism, it's a small effort and well tolerated vaccine in my experience.
    But it does indeed only protect against one strain, the most common one however.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
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    Default

    I had no idea. I was thinking the boy is bot proof, but not so much. Sigh.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2011
    Location
    Warren County, NJ
    Posts
    1,197

    Default

    Ignorance is bliss. Years ago I boarded at a farm where our hay often had dead deer parts inside the bales. I don't think we even vaccinated for Botulism back then. Yikes. That's one scary disease. The vaccine does help, but it's not a 100% guaranteee.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2001
    Location
    Catharpin, Virginia
    Posts
    6,788

    Default

    Yes, the only vaccination we have for horses is for Type B, but the good news is that is the most common offender.

    I did know of a mare and her foal who were lost to Type C. So sad.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2008
    Location
    Warren County, NJ
    Posts
    156

    Default

    THANK YOU JB! I did not know that
    Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakend. ~Anatole France~
    www.EquineKneadsLLC.com



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    1,246

    Default

    Incidentally, there is a lecture on this very topic tonight at New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, PA. It's free to the public, you just have to register:

    http://www.vet.upenn.edu/Calendarand...7/Default.aspx

    As an extra plug, it's being given by one of my favorite vets and lecturers at NBC, Ray Sweeney.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2001
    Location
    Catharpin, Virginia
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    Default

    Yes, ignorance MAY be bliss until you have a horse hit with botulism. It's very nearly always fatal and it's really a horrible death.

    A $20 vaccination is a small price to pay for protection against the most prevalent type B.

    Years ago I had heard it was a "round bale problem". I didn't vaccinate for it, nor did my vet at the time recommend it.

    Well, I learned my lesson the hard way. Lucky for me, my 3 yr. old horse survived, but only with immediate hospitalization, early administration of antitoxin and a total 3 month $25,000 bill. Scariest thing I've ever witnessed to watch a horse neurologically "melt down" so quickly. Thank God it wasn't Type C.

    What's really sad is my neighbor whose daughter was working here at the time and was going through this saga were feeding round bales to their horse and their 1 boarded horse. The boarded horse was vaccinated, but they lost their big grey 5 year old Perch to botulism munching on the same round bale. Granted, there can be a "pocket" of within a bale that affects a single horse without another. It's a crap shoot.

    Guess watching what my "Kingsley" went through didn't teach them a thing --just to save $20 bucks on a vaccination.

    Footnote: there is no way to know if it's type B or C that has stricken the horse until fecal cultures are done and that can take many days. Therefore, when a horse is treated with antitoxin it is only for Type B without really knowing. Typically they need feeding tubes (as they cannot swallow as everyting is paralzed -- including the blink response, so ointment is needed to keep the eyeballs moist -- so one can spend $15K in just 3 days for hospital care (for Type B) and still lose the battle if it turns out to be Type C. It's is good to know Type B is the MOST prevalent and there is a vaccination for it, though.



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