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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 9, 2007
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    Delaware
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    428

    Default Perfect horse failed PPE :( Just a whine!

    So after looking at some total crappo horses for my mom, I found the PERFECT one, only to have him fail the PPE miserably! As in positive on all flexions and he's only 4, so we didn't even do xrays. Vet said there was no point in xraying as he should have not been that reactive at his age.

    I'm just bummed and feeling like I won't find another one I like as much So I just needed to whine a little! I never thought finding a glorified trail horse would be so hard! I'm the pickiest horse person I know, so to find one that I really love is tough! Anyone found a better one after "the one" failed the PPE?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2008
    Posts
    1,325

    Default

    sorry about that

    I took a day off and drove several hourse to another state with my husband money in hand and he had the funkiest moving hocks either of us had ever seen, asked seller if he always did that and she said "did what" we left and didn't even do a prepurchase as he was 2



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 9, 2007
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    Delaware
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    428

    Default

    That's the tough thing, too, I am very limited on time and have decided to not to travel over about an hour away since I've wasted sooo much time on ones that were NOT what they said they were!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
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    5,418

    Default

    Oh, no. Was that the QH you posted in the hunting forum about? I thought that horse was older, for some reason.

    Anyway, I'm sorry about the PPE, but it may be for the best. A four year old for Mom?
    I never rode a broke horse but then maybe I'm a sorry hand. - Ray Hunt

    Chase the trouble. - Buck Brannaman



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 9, 2007
    Location
    Delaware
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    428

    Default

    He was seriously one of the most broke/quiet horses I've sat on, I couldn't believe he was only 4 when I tried him! Already have one one "oldie" on the farm, so was looking in the 8-15 range, but looked at this one based on the video they sent.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2006
    Posts
    923

    Default

    Me!! Last year I was looking for a new horse - wanted something to go out on trails around the barn and do some very low level hunter shows. Found an appy that I really liked. I'm a pretty timid rider, and get anxious at the canter, but I was able to canter him without any problem at all! Got him vetted, and turned out he had bad feet. We'd been through that with my daughter's OTTB, and I wasn't going to intentionally buy a horse with bad feet! Kept looking, and found my boy a couple of months later. I really liked him, even though I wasn't able to canter him at all...but he just seemed to have such a good attitude! A year later, and I am so glad at how things turned out. It probably wasn't as smooth a start as the appy would have been, but I think I'm much happier with him than I would have been with the appy. We did our first show last month, and ended up with reserve champion! So keep looking, there will be more great ones out there!

    ETA - I just sent you a PM.
    Last edited by nevertoolate; Sep. 30, 2011 at 08:41 PM. Reason: Sent you a PM



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2011
    Posts
    156

    Default

    Wow! At 4 positive on all flexions...

    You *might* want to get a second opinion. Flexions are funny, but a lot of vets will NEVER pass a horse on the PPE, they get $ every time you get a PPE, but if you buy the horse they don't profit. You may not want to spend the extra cash (I understand) or this may be a trusted vet, I just wanted to throw that out there. If you don't know this vet really well I'd definitely get a second opinion.

    Remember! There are always plenty of horses! Good luck!
    "The best pace is a suicide pace, and today looks like a good day to die!"
    ----> Pre



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2007
    Location
    Southern California
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    899

    Default

    I had a mare that was positive on any foot you'd want to flex. Nothing wrong with her anywhere - just a weenie cry baby. You might want to take a picture.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2001
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    Trailer Trash Ammy!
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    19,520

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brooke View Post
    I had a mare that was positive on any foot you'd want to flex. Nothing wrong with her anywhere - just a weenie cry baby. You might want to take a picture.
    Seconded. There are plenty of horses that fail the flex test.
    "The standard you walk by is the standard you accept."--Lt. Gen. David Morrison, Austalian Army Chief



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2009
    Posts
    230

    Default

    Young horses especially can fail a flexion test and then pass one with flying colors six months later, then fail again six months after that. My understanding is that it's due to growth spurts/uneven muscling as they grow. Since you love the horse otherwise might be worth a second opinion and/or some x-rays.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 9, 2007
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    Delaware
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    Default

    It was my very trusted vet who is who I go to for anything lameness related, so I 100% trust her judgement. Said horse is built like a QH halter horse (although he isn't one, showed on the WP circuit) big body and smallish legs and feet, so I had my doubts going into it, but after having him on trial for a week was already in love with him! Hacked out alone, trail rode great, lead or followed, stood like a statue in the xties, loaded with a simple kiss, just had perfect manners! He was footsore (barefoot) and had cruddy looking feet from a STB farrier who'd been trimming him.

    I'm keeping in touch with the folks who own him and they are having their vet come out soon, so interested to hear what the xrays show if they do them. I just passed on them as it would have been really expensive and the vet thought flexions should have been better on such a young guy. Really bummed as he was pretty push button and so so easy to have around.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2002
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    2,739

    Default

    For what its worth, when selling a three year old, it failed flexions on all four; sold it to someone else with disclosure that she failed flexions on all four--they rode the horse, showed the horse, trail rode the horse, etc. You name it. The horse is now about twenty years old, and has never taken a lame step. I tend to question the validity of flexions when all four look bad.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 1999
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    Cypress, near Houston, Texas
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    8,719

    Default

    I don't like flexion tests as a predictive tool (like they are used in PPE). They can be so misleading and are NOT predictive at all.

    They are only useful as a diagnostic tool when you have a lameness issue. They can help isolate the problem.

    But they are NOT predictive.
    Visit Sonesta Farms website at www.sonestafarms.com or our FaceBook page at www.facebook.com/sonestafarms. Also showing & breeding Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.



  14. #14
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    Jul. 9, 2007
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    Delaware
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    Default

    So my question then is, if a horse is footsore in the front, fails a front fetlock flexion, and then flexes positive on both rear stifles, hocks, and fetlocks, what would you do? Xraying all that isn't an option (way too much money for me) and the horse is priced at $5K (has a show record, been in pro training most of his short life). Also the trainer he was with is known to lunge a ton, and start them young which was a concern. Also horse has conformation faults, large body, small feet with contracted heels and has been barefoot for over 6 months (so per vet the feet have poor conformation as well as that should have resolved itself in the long time he's been barefoot). The vet wasn't totally opposed to me buying him, but also pretty much said it isn't if he goes lame it's when. :-( and suggested that I, "maybe offer to trade some hay for him or something" as in not worth anywhere near asking price!

    I guess I'm surprised that some folks are saying all that isn't that big of a deal in such a young horse. I certainly don't want a lame 8 year old!



  15. #15
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    Nov. 14, 2007
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    Southern California
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    Default

    You hadn't mentioned the 'halter horse' build, the extensive lunging, the bad feet, the show record and the sore hocks and stifles before. I had assumed you meant the ankles flexed poorly. I'd be more concerned with all the rest than with ankle flexions alone.



  16. #16
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    Jul. 30, 2005
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    England
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by War Admiral View Post
    Seconded. There are plenty of horses that fail the flex test.
    I agree. Rue never flexes sound, but he is. He just objects to having his legs held like that.
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



  17. #17
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    Jul. 9, 2007
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    Delaware
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    Default

    Hocks and stifles were included in the positive on all flexions comment. He flexed positive on front fetlock, and all hind flexions (stifle, hock, fetlock) just to be clear. Show record is short, but just included that so people don't think I am nuts for wanting to pay $5K for a trail horse! Seems like everyone raises their eyebrows at that, but trust me I have looked at cheaper ones, and I want something that steers, knows the aids, and is broke, not a $500 follow the leader type horse



  18. #18

    Default

    Spending 10% of $5000 on xrays would probably be worth it to me. That's a big investment. Maybe I don't know how much xrays cost, but I would think $500 would buy you something?

    However, given the circumstances here, sounds like it was best to pass.

    Too bad. Even trading for hay isn't worth the time and expense trying to get a horse you like sound enough for light riding when he goes navicular on you.



  19. #19
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    Jul. 9, 2007
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    Delaware
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    Default

    I agree, Kwill, I think it's best, but it breaks my heart!

    Just to get front feet xrays would be $360 and that doesn't include the farm call, so it's pretty pricey!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 1999
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    Cypress, near Houston, Texas
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brooke View Post
    You hadn't mentioned the 'halter horse' build, the extensive lunging, the bad feet, the show record and the sore hocks and stifles before. I had assumed you meant the ankles flexed poorly. I'd be more concerned with all the rest than with ankle flexions alone.
    Yeah, with this information, I wouldn't have bought him, either. Sounds like there may be lots going on with this horse - none of it good.
    Visit Sonesta Farms website at www.sonestafarms.com or our FaceBook page at www.facebook.com/sonestafarms. Also showing & breeding Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.



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