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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
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    12,594

    Default Shoeing/farrier help/suggestions needed for sore horse

    My friend has a horse that she just got off the track a month ago. Horse vetted sound, and vet said he'd never seen such clean legs in a 7 yr old racehorse. (No long layoffs indicating any issues).

    Horse threw a hind shoe a week after vetting, and then the other hind shoe on the trailer trip down (3 hr drive). Horse seemed a little tenderfooted behind, but not lame.

    Horse had very low heels/long toe. Farrier (not one I use, but usually does ok), trimmed and shod him. Since then horse is off behind and is hitting his hind hoof on the other hind hoof when trotting. He moves short in front like he's protecting his hind end. Vet looked at him, ultrasounded legs, and said tendons are good, but his whole hind end seems sore.

    His hind feet look very unbalanced to me. The inside is lower than the outside so he appears to be standing duck footed Toes out, especially on the rt hind. I told my friend that the way he is trimmed/shod could be making him sore, and is why he is all of a sudden hitting his hind hoof with the other hind hoof. Right?

    But how should she get the farrier to correct it? Trim the outside to same height as inside? Put a trailer on inside? Is there a way to tell a farrier what you want done to correct the problem? I'm not a farrier, so am just trying to give her suggestions without insulting the farrier. But I also don't want the farrier to butcher the outside wall, if he trimmed the inside too short.

    I hope that makes sense. I don't have any pics, but hopefully you can picture the problem.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2002
    Location
    USA
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    1,918

    Default

    Perhaps a different farrier can take a look at the situation and decide how to best help the horse out. Per your post, if the farrier didn't balance the foot correctly, and now the horse is having interference and soreness issues, I wouldn't be inclined to bring him back to try and fix the situation. He may not have a lot of experience with LTLH issues.

    How long has this horse been off the track (1 month?) and is he being ridden?

    Pease don't tell your farrier (or any farrier) how to do their job. Saying something like "I want the lateral wall trimmed to match the medial wall and add a medial trailer to the LH shoe" is a great incentive for a farrier to pack up his tools and say "see ya later". It's OK to describe the situation and ask questions like "if we tried this, how would it affect the horse's movement?" but don't tell him how to do his job. He may hand you his tools and tell you to do it yourself

    It's akin to telling your doctor what diagnostics you need, what meds you should be prescribed, etc....



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2007
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    3,928

    Default

    If you think the hooves are the problem and you don't trust your farrier to fix it without instructions from COTH, then it's probably time to switch farriers.

    I know it's not your horse or your farrier OP, but that's what I'd say to your friend.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
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    Default

    Our farriers are limited here. I ADORE my farrier and have used him since Jet was 2 (he's 13 now), and NEVER had a problem, or not had him show up for an appt. Friend started using the barn farrier, without telling her old (my current) farrier, and kind of burned bridges with him since she used him for 10 yrs, then just quit. So she's stuck with what she has.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2011
    Posts
    26

    Default

    My advice would be to tell your friend to gather all the change she saved by using the "barn" farrier, go to those coin counting machines at the A&P, and get your farrier a gift card to a nice restaraunt or something and beg his forgiveness. Hope she sees the irony in all this LOL



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NWFARRIER View Post
    My advice would be to tell your friend to gather all the change she saved by using the "barn" farrier, go to those coin counting machines at the A&P, and get your farrier a gift card to a nice restaraunt or something and beg his forgiveness. Hope she sees the irony in all this LOL
    I think you're probably right. I'm not nearly as good at critiquing sheing as some of the posters are on here, but even I can tell that the back feet are really out of balance.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
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    3,831

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tarynls View Post
    Pease don't tell your farrier (or any farrier) how to do their job. Saying something like "I want the lateral wall trimmed to match the medial wall and add a medial trailer to the LH shoe" is a great incentive for a farrier to pack up his tools and say "see ya later". It's OK to describe the situation and ask questions like "if we tried this, how would it affect the horse's movement?" but don't tell him how to do his job. He may hand you his tools and tell you to do it yourself

    It's akin to telling your doctor what diagnostics you need, what meds you should be prescribed, etc....
    I do agree with the above to a degree.... saying if we tried this, etc... but often people forget YOU are the employer... you employ the professional to do their job, and of course must respect that persons profession; however, you are also the one that knows the horse, watches the horse daily and should be a big part of the horses care. And again pays the employee... and if the employee wants to quit, they can.

    The biggest part of my horses management is the team, vet, chiro, massage, farrier, trainer, owner respecting eachother and working together.

    If you have one of those that is not willing or thinks they know everything then you have a problem.

    You can measure the hoof and show the farrier that he is out of balance and have him correct it... or maybe your friend needs to find someone that can help the horse.
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2002
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    USA
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    NWFARRIER hit the nail on the head. Thank you. Your friend would do well to take his advice.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2007
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    I would find a way to unburn that bridge, as NWFARRIER suggested! My current farrier could probably be won over with coffee and a large box of donuts, LOL.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
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    Quote Originally Posted by doublesstable View Post
    I do agree with the above to a degree.... saying if we tried this, etc... but often people forget YOU are the employer... you employ the professional to do their job,
    Though this has been discussed ad naseum, one more time, let me point out that unless you have the farrier under contract, you are not his/her employer. While you do retain their services, they are self-employed.
    ...... And again pays the employee... and if the employee wants to quit, they can.
    I am an independent contractor and the client(not employer) is but one of my accounts and as such, the client pays for my services when rendered. And, I never quit, but I do fire accounts.
    If you have one of those that is not willing or thinks they know everything then you have a problem.
    Especially when its the owner and they somehow have the wrongheaded notion that I am in their employ and that the relationship between us is that of employer-employee.
    Last edited by Rick Burten; Sep. 29, 2011 at 07:54 PM.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
    Location
    California
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Burten View Post
    Though this has been discussed ad naseum, one more time, let me point out that unless you have the farrier under contract, you are not his/her employer. While you do retain their services, they are self-employed.

    I am an independent contractor and the client(not employer) is but one of my accounts and as such, the client for my services when rendered. And, I never quit, but I do fire accounts.

    Especially when its the owner and they somehow have the wrongheaded notion that I am in their employ and that the relationship between us is that of employer-employee.
    I didn't mention if they were or weren't self employed? Of course they are self employed, you employ their services.
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
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    3,836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by doublesstable View Post
    I didn't mention if they were or weren't self employed? Of course they are self employed, you employ their services.
    What you actually said was
    but often people forget YOU are the employer...And again pays the employee...
    Your attempt to now spin doctor what you said and implied is outed and a failure and your logic regarding 'employing their services' rather convoluted. I would however,. pay to see you employ someone's services in the absence of the individual providing said services.



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