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  1. #641
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    Jan. 9, 2012
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    Wow- just saw this thread. I can relate! I hadn't ridden in more than 10 years, and started back into riding again in mid-2010. Got my very first horse ever (at the age of 31!) in November 2010 who was green but seemed like a saint- a then-7-year-old who had been only since about age 5 or so. But he was so sweet, easy-going and would jump anything you put in front of him.

    Well....after too long he started getting more erratic, turned into Gumby when under saddle and would head toss and get out of control despite no physical issues. I almost sold him because he was becoming too much for me. I had a "lawt straw" moment when at our last show in October, he sat and spun in the ring and refused to move. Nice. Off to training he went, and I worked on me to become more confident.

    We're now progressing at the speed of molasses, but progressing nonetheless. We managed to canter several jumps this past weekend, which was huge since we have really only been trotting them due to his Gumby lack-of-straightness issues and his canter being out of control.

    I am back to enjoying it now, but like many of you, I have many "WTF" thoughts- green on green! What was I thinking! But I love my boy.



  2. #642
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2012
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    1

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    As someone who has taught riding to beginner adults - specializing in those that were terrified of horses due to bad experiences in the past - I know that adults often suffer from paralysis by overanalysis. I think part of the problem might be nerves, and the tension that is held in the body because of it. If you can learn to relax and breath during your ride, you will find it easier to sit deeper in the saddle. Remember your body position - shoulders to hips to heels, and keep those heels well down to keep your butt in the saddle. Going back to the basics completely might help you with this new horse - and I mean basics for both of you.
    Each horse is different and you just have to find your rhythm with your new TB. Keep going. Even if you don't always believe it, you are making good progress. Also, the pilates will help you immensely. You'll be stronger and the workout will help you with relaxation and some well-needed time to yourself.

    Good luck!



  3. #643
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2010
    Location
    Down South
    Posts
    810

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    So, my trainer's sick and canceled on me. Which led to me going online and looking at horse for sale ads -- again. But this time, I looked at UK horses for sale. I think part of it was because I'd read the thread in this forum about starting horses here vs in Europe.

    Big mistake. HUGE.

    I found this guy for me:
    http://www.horsemart.co.uk/hunters_h.../advert/203271

    Bigger photo:
    http://www.lakeside-stables.co.uk/TH...RRIOR%2012.JPG

    And I even came across the cutest little pony for you, spacytracy, because misery loves company :
    http://www.horsemart.co.uk/all_round.../advert/203488

    Those are just two that I came across in the first 5 minutes of poking around online. And yeah, there's always the steep import/transport fees. But looking at similar horses here in the U.S., the price isn't that far off. And in some cases, is still cheaper.

    Sorry. Not trying to start a debate on importing/not importing. Because, really, I won't have $16,000 to spend on a horse for at least 3 or 4 years. Maybe more. It just ... it's just kind of hard to wrap my head around the differences.
    The dude abides ...



  4. #644
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2010
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    2,831

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    Ok seriously why are you doing this to me?!?! Misery really does love company. That horse is CUTE! And yours is a hunk!

    This stinks! Curse you!



  5. #645
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2010
    Location
    Down South
    Posts
    810

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    Quote Originally Posted by spacytracy View Post
    This stinks! Curse you!
    I couldn't resist. Seriously. The one I liked was listed three down from the top, and the pony was like five down. I just HAD to share. Besides, he has the cutest little face. And FEATHERS!!
    The dude abides ...



  6. #646
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,831

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    Ok, all. I'm not denying my h/j heritage but I ordered a dressage saddle yesterday- an older Crosby. Its really pretty and its BROWN. I love brown dressage saddles. Hopefully it will fit pony and help me get my balance a little better. I am having a hard time staying balanced and secure in my CC saddles.

    Can't wait to get it/try it on!



  7. #647
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,807

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    Uh-oh, spacytracy...the saddle collecting begins! It starts with just a dressage saddle, then there's that jumping saddle with just a little more depth in the seat, then there's a western saddle..you know, for trail rides and the occasional guest...
    Ask me how I know this.
    I peaked with 6 saddles and one rideable horse



  8. #648
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,831

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    I'm currently up to.....
    2 CC saddles
    1 western saddle
    1 leadline saddle
    1 western leadline saddle


    I'm becoming a hoarder. I want to sell the one (the county I just got) but I keep thinking "what if I need it for the next horse".

    Its a sickness



  9. #649
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2010
    Location
    Down South
    Posts
    810

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    I've already decided the next practical saddle I buy (not even owning a horse) will be an adjustable tree saddle. And right now, I'm leaning towards/have heard good things about the M. Toulouse saddles with the Genesis tree. You can adjust it by bit by bit, instead of just changing out gullet plates.

    I like this one:
    http://intecperformancegear.com/M.-T...800GENLF5.html

    Anyway ... I figure since I may be leasing, or at least continuing my lessons on so many different horses, it might be a good investment. So I keep telling myself. Y'know.
    The dude abides ...



  10. #650
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2009
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    82

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    I love this thread. I rode hunters, starting at age 5, and stopped before my freshman year of college for....well, college. Worked on campaigns, got involved in politics, met future husband, moved out to DC, got married and finally decided that enough was enough. I needed the horses back! Though in fairness, I feel like they never really left.

    But it is such a different experience to ride as an adult, than as a young person. I'll be 30 next year, but there is a huge difference.

    I found a great Eventing barn out in VA, where I'm leasing a wonderful schoolmaster, who is teaching me how to do the jumpers again, with some great dressage work as well. In just six weeks I feel stronger and more brave than I did in our first lesson, where trotting over small verticals felt like a huge accomplishment!

    Two things- first, how do y'all balance the horses with real life? My husband is a resident, and is on call 1-2 days per week, so actually we still see each other often enough during the week that I don't feel like I'm neglecting him. But I still live in the District, and my barn is an hour away. In traffic at night coming from the Hill, it can take me 1.5 hours at least. I'm dedicated so I'm making it work, but it's tough with time constraints like work. I wish I could ride every day.

    Also, I feel like the brave/I'll jump anything on anyone 16 year old that I once was is long gone. I still get a little anxious those first few jumps in my lessons. I was reading through this thread and think someone said that as adults, we tend to over-analyze our riding, as opposed to just doing it. So true and so well-said!

    We have our first combined test in March and I can't wait. My Mom (also an adult rerider) is coming out for it!
    recovering hunter rider turned eventer



  11. #651
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,831

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    Welcome! For me personally, its a delicate balance. Im sure at times my hubby feels a bit neglected. However, its also important that he have "his" time too, and he does, so for the most part, I don't feel guilty.

    What helps me is remembering that marriage comes with all kinds of sacrifices and riding is one of them. If I was single I'd probably ride every day.



  12. #652
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    4,772

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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus1 View Post
    I've already decided the next practical saddle I buy (not even owning a horse) will be an adjustable tree saddle. And right now, I'm leaning towards/have heard good things about the M. Toulouse saddles with the Genesis tree. You can adjust it by bit by bit, instead of just changing out gullet plates.

    I like this one:
    http://intecperformancegear.com/M.-T...800GENLF5.html

    Anyway ... I figure since I may be leasing, or at least continuing my lessons on so many different horses, it might be a good investment. So I keep telling myself. Y'know.
    You probably are aware that Toulouse saddles aren't generally well thought of on this forum. I will say, however, that for the money, I think they are great. Our BO has them for all her school horses. I would say most of them are at least 5 or 6 years old. They are heavily used and have held up well, and the lesson kids and college students who use them find them very comfortable.

    I bought a Noelle for my daughter several years ago when we leased a TB who couldn't use her old saddle (a Stubben). It fit him well and looked very nice for shows. She rode in it 3-4 times/week for about two years, and it still looks almost new.

    I am glad Toulouse is making an adjustable tree now; that wasn't an option when I bought my daughter's.



  13. #653
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    4,772

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    Welcome WIExpat!

    My husband used to fuss about the time I spent at the barn, but he has come around. I was very frank with him and said the horses are necessary for my well-being and my peace of mind. They are my therapy and do a lot to reduce the stress in my life. He sees that it is true, and he's pretty supportive now (though he doesn't really know how much it costs). He goes to our awards banquet with me every year and takes pictures though he hasn't gone to a show with me yet. (He did go to one or two when DD was showing.)



  14. #654
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    4,772

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    Quote Originally Posted by spacytracy View Post
    I'm currently up to.....
    2 CC saddles
    1 western saddle
    1 leadline saddle
    1 western leadline saddle


    I'm becoming a hoarder. I want to sell the one (the county I just got) but I keep thinking "what if I need it for the next horse".

    Its a sickness
    I notice you did not include the new dressage saddle in the list!

    Back in the day when I rode in a lot of horse trials, I coveted a dressage saddle but never had the money for one. I tend to save the saddles from the past. Right now we have

    Stubben Rex my parents bought for my first pony when I was 8 (DD also used it)
    2 Stubben Siegfrieds (one I bought used in 1979--the other was my sister's and now belongs to DD--mine is my everyday saddle)
    Toulouse Noelle (DD's)



  15. #655
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,807

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    Welcome WIExpat! I don't envy you with the DC traffic. I've only gone through it a few times, on my way from CT to VA for hunting. I hated it so much that I now take the "longer" route through PA so I can keep moving.

    It is hard to find enough time for riding and balance it with time for your spouse. I'm VERY lucky. My husband is both supportive and self-sufficient. His hobbies are motorcycles and target shooting, so it works out pretty well for us. Most any day that the weather's nice enough for riding, it's also nice enough for motorcycles and/or shooting, so he stays happy and busy while I'm at the barn. I still have to be careful, though, to make sure he doesn't feel ignored.

    Spacytracy, I understand the urge to hang onto that County for "the next horse". I sold an old Crosby Mark VII to pay vet bills, and I wish I'd hung onto it. I didn't get a lot for it, and now I'd like to have a flat saddle to use for strengthening my legs and improving my seat.

    Opus1, I have the Pessoa with the adjustable gullet plates. I love the saddle, it's very comfortable and puts me in a great spot for my riding, which is probably 70% on the flat and 30% over small fences. I have changed the plate out twice. It came with a medium, I went to the narrow when my pony first came back to work after a long layoff, then recently returned to the medium. It's not too hard to change the plate, although I have my husband help me; it's easier with two people. You could not, however, change it back and forth regularly. For instance, if you were riding two horses each week, you couldn't swap out the plates twice a week, I believe the fittings would wear out or loosen up. However, if you're leasing a horse for some period of time and want to fit that horse, while still having the ability to change the fit for a future differnt horse, they're great for taht.

    I haven't tried the Toulouse saddles. However, I will say that any discussion of saddles on this forum often invites many responses from riders who like very expensive saddles, like Antares and Butet. I'm sure they're lovely, but they're not in the budget for many of us, and there are many saddles of good quality that work just fine for less, IMHO.



  16. #656
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2012
    Posts
    2,220

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    I personally LOVE my M Toulouse Celine saddle, and so does my paint gelding.



  17. #657
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA and New Orleans, LA
    Posts
    1,586

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    Hi WIExpat! Like you, I quit riding when college became the priority. Then for me it was law school and slaving away as a junior associate that kept me away. I didn't start back until I was 37. Believe me, the girl who would ride/jump anything is definitely gone! I was just starting to get some of my old confidence back, and then I took a fall and broke my collar bone. So, now I am working on building courage again. I get **very** pleased with myself when I manage an 18" vertical, and then I remember how pathetic my teenage-self would have thought that was!

    Juggling riding with being a real-world adult (with an hour commute to the barn) sucks. I'd kill to be able to ride every day. But work is necessary to pay for the hay, etc. And it would not be fair to my husband for me to use all of my free time riding. Just do your best to make sure you are still doing stuff with your DH that he wants to do.

    My husband is crazy busy too, so most of our quality time has always been on vacations. While it is hard for me to go out of town for a couple of weeks in summer, or travel three weekends in a row over the holidays (because it takes time away from the barn) I do it because that is when we have a lot of fun together. I also try to make sure I am home from the barn early enough on weekends to go to dinner with friends, etc.

    Like Hinerella, my DH has his own hobbies that keep him occupied on nice days (running, biking and golfing). This has really helped.

    I am really lucky that he is very supportive, and comes to almost all of my shows to be my "person." He helps get me organized to get on, wipes boots before I enter the ring, has water waiting for me and Tajar between classes, etc. And he is the designated photographer. I don't know what I'd do on show days without him!

    spacytracy, et al -- on the saddle thing -- I am a total hoarder. I have a Stubben Scandica VSD that I love that I used for lessons when I first started riding again in 2008, a Passier I got in 2009 when I wanted a CC saddle (the Stubben is an AP), and then last year I had a County made that is perfect for me and my horse. Since I got the County I have not ridden in either the Stubben or the Passier, but I refuse to sell them. They are great saddles, and I'd never get what they are worth to me personally. DH rides in the Stubben on the rare occasions he rides the barn's designated "husband horse" out in the pasture with us.

    I also hoard other tack, saddle pads, and field boots (I have a field boot addiction). My husband finds this fascinating, because in every other aspect of my life, I am the opposite of a hoarder. For all other goods/clothes, etc., if I haven't used it in 2 years, it gets donated to the Junior League thrift shop.
    Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby, to be picked up and laid down like a game of solitaire. It is a grand passion.... ~ Emerson



  18. #658
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    1,807

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    Tarheel, I'm totally like you I am constantly throwing away excess stuff in my "real life" but have a huge collection of horsey stuff. Dress boots, field boots (both black and brown), paddock boots (even though I always ride in tall boots). Somehow I'm always sure of the need for that extra bridle, just as I"m sure I don't need that extra black turtleneck!



  19. #659
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA and New Orleans, LA
    Posts
    1,586

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hinderella View Post
    Tarheel, I'm totally like you I am constantly throwing away excess stuff in my "real life" but have a huge collection of horsey stuff. Dress boots, field boots (both black and brown), paddock boots (even though I always ride in tall boots). Somehow I'm always sure of the need for that extra bridle, just as I"m sure I don't need that extra black turtleneck!
    HA -- I have paddock boots too! Never ridden in them, but I have them! They did come in handy this past summer, when it was so hot. I wore them at shows until literally right before I had to get on, then I put on my tall boots.
    Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby, to be picked up and laid down like a game of solitaire. It is a grand passion.... ~ Emerson



  20. #660
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2012
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    2,220

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    Tarheel- am I to assume you went to UNC? Me too And also in Atlanta!



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