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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2011
    Posts
    14

    Default Just call her "Yawn-y"

    Hi All,
    Long time lurker...second time posting.
    I'm wondering if anyone else has this "issue" with their horse.
    My darling 6 y/o mare is always yawning...she yawns while I groom her, she gives a ginormous yawn when I put her bridle on. Under saddle, she yawns when I give her the rein to stretch, she yawns at the halt. She has no shortage of energy and is not lacking in forward.
    I love that she seems relaxed in her work, but the yawning just seems excessive and I'm wondering if there is another reason behind it besides relaxation.
    Any thoughts???



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2007
    Posts
    2,899

    Default

    Can be a sign of tummy troubles if excessive. Also can be a sign of stress. You may want to have her checked for ulcers. Horses can yawn for no reason, but your mare seems extreme. You may also want to have the vet take a look at her tongue, lips, teeth, and gums. There may be a problem in her mouth causing her pain.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2011
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Yup...she does have ulcers, they just flared up about a month ago (read- not eating normally, really REALLY crabby) and is on Gastro-gard. She is now eating normally and is her normal sweet self.
    Her annual dentist appt is on Thursday, so I'll have the vet check out her mouth.
    Thanks!!!!!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2011
    Location
    The Land of Buggies and Black Bumpers
    Posts
    963

    Default

    I had a vet tell me once that excessive yawning is a sign of chronic liver failure. That was three years ago and the horse is just fine with no medical problems! The yawning only went on for a couple days and has never returned.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,881

    Default

    Ulcers, teeth, and what many people don't realize, chiropractic issues around the poll.

    And just remember, there are many symptoms that fit many different issues, so just because there is one symptom doesn't mean it IS this or that.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    It can happen when a horse releases emotionally or physically.

    It can also happen when a horse is not 'ok' with whatever 'it' is causing the yawn.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,035

    Default

    It can also be something as simple as throat or mouth irritation. If I feed my horses cookies and they get stuck in their teeth they yawn.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    3,768

    Default

    I start to yawn uncontrollably when I am about to get a migrain.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2007
    Posts
    1,807

    Default

    I have one yawner .......but his is due to being uncomfortable due to his PSSM......before he was diagnosed he yawned constantly and ground his teeth..........he had two issues low selenium and PSSM after both were addressed his yawning almost stopped.....he still does it once in awhile.

    Dalemma



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    7,022

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    ...teeth, and what many people don't realize, chiropractic issues around the poll.
    This seems to be the cause of my horse's yawning. He holds alot of tension in his neck and poll so he yawns to try to adjust his jaw and release the tension.
    The more perfect our happiness,
    the more nagging and wretched
    do our unsolved problems seem.
    ~ Gordon Grand



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2009
    Location
    Northeast Ohio, where mud rules your world...
    Posts
    1,366

    Default

    could be she's only getting reruns of The Price Is Right on her tv.

    could be she's staying up late on the computer playing Farmville.

    Could be her neighbor snores all night and she's not getting good z's.

    could be she thinks you a miserable bore....


    these are all merely predictions and I am not a vet, but it could be...




    On a serious note, this is a stumper. I wonder how yawning is coorelated to organ function?
    ...don't sh** where you eat...



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    IME yawning is more a sign of some sort of irritation around the head/face than a sense of boredom or fatigue in horses.

    I put a nice, soft leather halter on one of my yearllings this week to get him used to wearing something on his head for longer than five minutes and he probably yawned 50 times in the first half hour!

    My mare often yawns and stretches after I take her bridle off if she's sweaty. She'd REALLY rather rub her head on me, but knows that's not allowed.

    I wonder how yawning is coorelated to organ function?
    Just because someone says it might be, doesn't mean it is.

    Hiccups can be a sign of liver problems in humans, but mostly they're just . . . hiccups.
    Click here before you buy.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2010
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    921

    Default

    Our school ponies yawn every time a student takes off their halters in order to bridle them...then, they'll yawn again when the bridle comes off. That itchy/irritated feeling just gets to them!

    Since horses can't/don't breathe through their mouths, yawning isn't related to increased oxygen intake, is it? I get yawn-y when I change elevations (hubby is from Denver area, so family visits have been anywhere from 3,000 to 5,000 ft. changes!).



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2006
    Location
    top o' the world!
    Posts
    225

    Default

    I have a horse that yawns excessively like you describe yours doing. Years ago he had gotten his head stuck in a wooden fence and gave a good yank to it. Recently, due to several small quirks (yawning a lot being on of them) I brought him to a vet who ultrasounded his TMJ and x-rayed his skull. Turns out he crushed/fractured/damaged his inner ear on the right side! As well as cartilage damage through his hyoid area. We think he yawns a lot as he could be trying to equalize pressure in his inner ear. Go figure!
    Horses don't lie.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    yawning isn't related to increased oxygen intake, is it?
    We don't really breathe when we yawn. Sighing is a normal reflex response to shallow breathing or borderline oxygen exchange, but that's quite different from a yawn.

    Nobody can agree why people yawn, either, so the fact that it's a mystery in horses is not really surprising.
    Click here before you buy.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2010
    Posts
    70

    Default

    Ihad a horse that did the same thing. It was caused by pain in the pole area. Acupuncture fixed it.



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