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View Poll Results: What do you look for in a prospective jumper?

Voters
49. You may not vote on this poll
  • I buy babies. I only look at the pedigee to indicate jump talent.

    1 2.04%
  • I buy 2-3 yr olds. I want to see them freejump a little to prove their talent.

    13 26.53%
  • I buy 2-3 yr olds. I only look at the pedigee, not freejumping, to indicate jump talent.

    3 6.12%
  • I buy older horses and want to see them jump under saddle.

    29 59.18%
  • Other

    3 6.12%
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2002
    Posts
    2,555

    Default buying a jumper

    When you're looking to buy a jumper, what's your game plan? If a combination of the poll items, please explain.
    ............................................
    http://www.xanthoria.com/OTTB
    ............................................



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2002
    Posts
    2,555

    Default

    OK so looks like people mostly look to buy horses already jumping under saddle, then youngsters they can see jumping.

    How is it then that in looking for a youngster I am having a terrible time getting videos of them jumping? Not just due to lack of video skills - more due to lack of jump facilities and breeders saying they don't know how to freejump a horse or even imply it's an unusual request.

    Its commonplace to put a 2-3 yr old through a chute once or twice in Europe to show it's skills.

    Am I looking in the wrong places? I've asked to see 2+ yr olds from CA to NY doing a bit of freejumping and I think only 2 people have managed it. And these are horses being marketed as hunter/jumper/eventers.

    ............................................
    http://www.xanthoria.com/OTTB
    ............................................



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,806

    Default

    There's not an option for what I would have picked.

    I buy both youngsters and older horses. Typically my youngsters are well-bred (jumper) babies. But I don't buy based on pedigree alone or by seeing them jump. I don't care what they look like through a chute when they're young. I bought my latest youngster as a coming-yearling and while we did put some little crossrails in a chute and send him through it, I wasn't looking at his form. I was looking to see how he mentally adapted to being challenged with something. What I'm looking for in a youngster is a particular way of handling new things (I want a horse that's sensitive enough to be a little spooky but bold enough to be curious). And then I evaluate athleticism through a combination of conformation and how the horse moves on the flat. There's no need to send them over jumps if you have an educated eye and/or have someone to help you who does

    I also don't care what older horses look like over jumps, although my caveat is that I'm typically buying "broken" or "project" horses, and I aim everything to the jumper ring where form doesn't matter as much. But like with the youngsters, I'm happy to evaluate a horse through conformation and movement on the flat.
    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2004
    Location
    Elizabethtown, KY
    Posts
    2,724

    Default

    I buy and sell jumpers, and also breed. With foals and yearlings I have purchased based on conformation, bloodlines, and general athelticism. For anything 2yo and beyond I want to at least see what its reflexes are over some small jumps in a chute. 3-4yo and up should be able to jump something worth jumping through the chute and give me a good idea of its aptitude.

    And I disagree that you can pick a superior jumper just on conformation and movement alone. Certainly up to 3'6" or so, most horses who have a reasonable degree of athleticism should do ok. But for horses aimed towards the bigger jumps, I definitely want to see it pop over something, especially if it is under saddle.

    I have also found that all the horses I have bought from video (usually free jumping video), have jumped essentially the same under saddle as through the chute. That has been my experience thus far anyway.

    So to the OP, NO, I do not think you are being unreasonable in wanting to see a young horse jump a few jumps through a chute. Good luck in your search!
    Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice; it is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved. - William Jennings Bryan

    http://www.halcyon-hill.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2009
    Location
    Osteen, FL
    Posts
    1,683

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by buschkn View Post
    I buy and sell jumpers, and also breed. With foals and yearlings I have purchased based on conformation, bloodlines, and general athelticism. For anything 2yo and beyond I want to at least see what its reflexes are over some small jumps in a chute. 3-4yo and up should be able to jump something worth jumping through the chute and give me a good idea of its aptitude.

    And I disagree that you can pick a superior jumper just on conformation and movement alone. Certainly up to 3'6" or so, most horses who have a reasonable degree of athleticism should do ok. But for horses aimed towards the bigger jumps, I definitely want to see it pop over something, especially if it is under saddle.

    I have also found that all the horses I have bought from video (usually free jumping video), have jumped essentially the same under saddle as through the chute. That has been my experience thus far anyway.

    So to the OP, NO, I do not think you are being unreasonable in wanting to see a young horse jump a few jumps through a chute. Good luck in your search!
    Great post Karina! We too have purchased, bred and sold jumpers and have found that in our own experience the free jumping chute is a great indicator of their strengths and weaknesses regarding their future performance under saddle in future.

    When we free jump our youngsters once as a yearling, once as a two year old and again as a three year old, we note down the following: Attitude, technique, power, quickness of the ground and anything else that we notice at the time.

    Thus far, the notes regarding their strengths and weaknesses have held true as they have progressed in their jumping careers.
    Ryu Equestrian & Facebook Page
    Breeding Horses Today, for the Equestrian Sport of Tomorrow.
    Osteen & Gainesville, Florida.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    12,044

    Default

    When I get a youngster, ideally I want to at least be able to sit on it for a few minutes, even if it is super green and wandering all over the place. I don't particularly care about a free jump through a chute, although I do agree with PNW that seeing the horse's reaction to being challenged/presented with something new can be instructive in terms of evaluating the animal's temperament and personality. As she pointed out, you want to see a good combination of bravery and paying attention, I think.

    I am sure there are people who can just look at a pedigree on paper and make a good decision about a jumper prospect, but I'm not one of them. I make my breeder friends crazy by not caring all that much about lineage. It's not that I don't understand why it matters; I just usually buy for myself and that means I have the luxury of evaluating a horse solely as an individual, and whether I get a sense that there is some sort of match between us. The horses I've bought have all "spoken" to me in some fashion, and I've yet to have one that didn't work out - so it's an approach that has proven itself to me over time.

    That said, I went to just say hello to a couple real babies at a friend's farm last weekend and absolutely fell in love with a gorgeous colt. (For the breeding fanatics, it turns out he is very nicely bred, LOL.) I have NO business even thinking about buying such a young horse, but oh, man. Can't get him out of my head. *sigh*
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2007
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    894

    Default

    Okay I am kind of other, that is because when I went overseas I originally had the intent to buy a younger horse (one that is already started undersaddle at least, not a lot of jumping but just x-rails), but ended up getting a seasoned one because I just liked the horse enough and went for it.

    If I were to do it again, I will probably go back and buy one or two 4 year olds with good lines and undersaddle and train them up just so i can have a fun project for myself. However after buying a nice seasoned horse I am quite happy with how we don't have to start from square one with her and that I finally have an opportunity to work on myself. So I guess it is very situational for me, and really depends on what my long term goals are here, which is the high/low a.o., I knew with the seasoned horse what to expect in the end, and it wasn't as big of a risk as going with a young one.



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