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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2009
    Posts
    134

    Default Storing tack for extended period

    My DD is off to college and her horse was sold, so she won't be using any of her beautiful bridles, etc for quite a while. How should I store it, so that it stays in good condition until she has a horse of her own again?

    TIA



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2010
    Location
    Earlysville, Virginia
    Posts
    3,244

    Default

    Some of the higher quality saddle/bridle bags will keep the stuff in good condition. You could clean it, oil it, put it in a bag and then store in a trunk.

    I think the best thing is to keep it inside where the temp is regulated. If you can, take it to your house where you know nothing will happen to it.
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    11,465

    Default

    The time honored pony club way is to take all the bridles apart, clean them very well, and then cover them in vaseline. Yes, vaseline. You then wrap them in wax paper and store that way.

    Yes, I have done this and yes, it does work.

    But you can also just clean and condition normally, and store in regular bridle bags. You will need to take them out once in a while to re-clean them, but as long as you do that, they will be fine.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2011
    Posts
    130

    Default

    I store mine in my garage. Bridles go in bridle bags, pads are washed and stacked, blankets and sheets in their plastic bags (or those bags duvet covers come in if you dont have the original bags). We dont keep our car in the garage so even though its not temp controlled the door is rarely opened so everything stays dry.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 29, 2004
    Posts
    10,510

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lucassb View Post
    The time honored pony club way is to take all the bridles apart, clean them very well, and then cover them in vaseline. Yes, vaseline. You then wrap them in wax paper and store that way.

    Yes, I have done this and yes, it does work.

    But you can also just clean and condition normally, and store in regular bridle bags. You will need to take them out once in a while to re-clean them, but as long as you do that, they will be fine.
    I should have known you would mention vaseline, I thought I was the only old fart who would remember that. And I was always told to leave the bridle in pieces, rather than put it together, to spare stress on the holes I think, until you need to use it again. In the absence of bridle bags, I used to store mine in pillow cases and leave them in the linen closet.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    11,465

    Default

    Ah, BAC...all of us dinosaurs must stick together
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2010
    Posts
    881

    Default

    I had no horses for 12 years and had my tack all willy nilly,. Here's how it fared.

    All of it was a touch dry and moldy.

    The WORST was the stuff I stored in a barn. That saddle was bright green with mold. I cleaned it up and it was OK.

    I had another saddle in my garage. That one was dusty but fine. No mold at all. Just needed a good cleaning.

    I had a bunch of stuff in a sealed bin in my very damp basement. It was high off the ground. That stuff was really in the best shape. No mold or dryness. I think because it doesn't really get too hot or cold down there it fared the best. Plus the storage bin kept out moisture.

    Good luck!
    ==================
    Somehow my inner ten year old seems to have stolen my chequebook!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    2,982

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BAC View Post
    I should have known you would mention vaseline, I thought I was the only old fart who would remember that. And I was always told to leave the bridle in pieces, rather than put it together, to spare stress on the holes I think, until you need to use it again. In the absence of bridle bags, I used to store mine in pillow cases and leave them in the linen closet.
    Another old fart here. I remember learning about the vaseline trick in Pony Club. Never actually tried it, though. I stored tack for thirty years in closed boxes, and when I got it out again to use, it was dry and stiff. I had the stitching checked for safety and conditioned everything, and the tack is still going strong.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
    Posts
    2,064

    Default

    Take the bridles apart and put each one in a fabric bridle bag. Be sure not to mix up any of the parts in between bridles. Store in the house in a climate controlled area, not in an attic or basement, and not too near any air vents. If I knew I was going to store tack for an extended period of time, I'd give it a good cleaning and oiling first.

    To be very serious, though, you might want to consider selling the tack on ebay. It's very hard for me to part with tack, so I can sympathize with wanting to keep it, but time passes more quickly than you think it will and in 10 years you might unpack it to find that there are cracks at some stress points (like where the reins attach to the bit) and you won't feel safe using it. Tack doesn't always last forever, and for some reason tack that isn't in use sometimes doesn't seem to do as well. I do have a few bridles in use that are approaching the 25 year mark, but they are bridles that have been in regular use with regular cleaning and conditioning.

    Ok, and let me also say that sometimes it seems to me that newer tack is not as durable as some of the stuff made a long time ago. I have a few pieces of schooling tack (martingales, etc.) that I bought used about thirty years ago, and it is so ugly and out of fashion I WISH it would crack and die but it won't.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westchester County, NY
    Posts
    947

    Default

    Old fart here, I packed my tack away for seven or eight years in Vaseline. That was about twenty years ago - tack still going strong.
    http://STA551.com
    845-363-1875



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