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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2000
    Location
    Way down south in the land of Sugar Cane
    Posts
    941

    Default

    So Katrina sure looks like she is coming to visit us in La. I live west of Baton Rouge so hopefully if the storm turns we will only get minimal damage. (Keeping my finger crossed) But if it does not turn I can not decide if I should leave the boys in or out. Last time we had a storm I left them out but the barn we had at the time was not very stable. Now we have a pole barn which is great but, the south and west side are open. The winds will be coming from the west and north. We buy loose shavings and store them on the west side of the barn next to the stalls which are open stalls (solid wall up to about 4'6"). I am worried that the wind will blow shavings in the horses faces. I can put fly masks on them but they will still have to breath the dust from the shavings. I could move the horse trailer to block the shavings partially but the lay of the land makes that difficult. I could just leave them out but the storm is expected to make landfall during the day and they are used to being out only at night.

    Any suggestions?

    Bopper



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2000
    Location
    Way down south in the land of Sugar Cane
    Posts
    941

    Default

    So Katrina sure looks like she is coming to visit us in La. I live west of Baton Rouge so hopefully if the storm turns we will only get minimal damage. (Keeping my finger crossed) But if it does not turn I can not decide if I should leave the boys in or out. Last time we had a storm I left them out but the barn we had at the time was not very stable. Now we have a pole barn which is great but, the south and west side are open. The winds will be coming from the west and north. We buy loose shavings and store them on the west side of the barn next to the stalls which are open stalls (solid wall up to about 4'6"). I am worried that the wind will blow shavings in the horses faces. I can put fly masks on them but they will still have to breath the dust from the shavings. I could move the horse trailer to block the shavings partially but the lay of the land makes that difficult. I could just leave them out but the storm is expected to make landfall during the day and they are used to being out only at night.

    Any suggestions?

    Bopper



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 8, 2005
    Location
    Port Saint Lucie,Florida
    Posts
    314

    Default

    The Hurricane that is headed towards you is a CAT.4...I say put YOU in the truck,w/your Personal Belonings....attach that 2 Horse Trailer w/Your Horses In It...and Get the He## OUT of THERE!!!!
    I Lived through 4 of these Bas***** Last Year....and I Lived through Andrew....Please LISTEN To ME!!!
    GET OUT OF THERE!!!!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2003
    Location
    St Aug, Fla
    Posts
    3,811

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    EVACUATE! Get out of there while you can. It was only a Cat 1 and only over land for a short time and Miami and the surrounding areas were hit hard. Imagine what it will do now as a Cat 4. It is not safe to stay there. Load up and move out. STAY SAFE! My fiance is just south of Mobile right now for a Merchant Mariner class until tomorrow night. I wish he wasnt there but am praying he gets out of class and is able to come home before it hits.
    ~~~~~~~~~

    Member of the ILMD[FN]HP Clique, The Florida Clique, OMGiH I loff my mares, and the Bareback Riders clique!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    9,923

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    You need to leave. If the area takes a nearly direct or direct hit you will be without power & safe drinking water for several days/week/weeks. Your fences will be down and shavings in your horses faces will be the least of your problems. Power lines will be down and your area will be under a mandated curfew making it difficult to come and go. Ice will be the new "gold" as everyone struggles to stay comfortable in the August heat.

    I lived in Charleston during Hurricane Hugo in 1989. No power for 2 weeks and we were on the "main power line" but 3 miles away from the start up point. Curfew bite, God bless the National Guard, but it's hard to get to your place when they say "nope, go away." Keep in mind that the worst, most horrific damage (houses in the trees) was 20 miles north of Charleston where the "eye" hit.

    If you must stay then leave halters w/ ID(contact info) on your horses. Leave on fly mask. Also, get a grease marker to write your name & phone number on your horses- the same grease marker endurance rides use to number those horses during rides.

    Stay safe no matter what you do.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2000
    Location
    Way down south in the land of Sugar Cane
    Posts
    941

    Default

    I am not evacuating. I was just asking for suggestions. I have been through hurricanes (ANDREW) and I realize we will be without power for a while because we live in the country. I will make up tags for the horses tomorrow. I forgot about that - I did it for the last storm.

    Actually, currently we could not even go anywhere to evacuate. We were supposed to go to Baton Rouge (let alone trying to go West) this evening to visit my parents because it would have taken us hours (normally 30 minutes) to get home because of traffic from people leaving New Orleans.

    I realize that hurricanes are dangerous and, I want to keep my horses safe.

    Thanks for your concern.

    Bopper



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2003
    Posts
    9,613

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    People are only recommending evacuation b/c it's the absolute safest thing you can do. A category 4 hurricane can devastate your barn, your fencing, and your home. Category 4 hurricanes cause casualties.

    If you intend on staying, you'd better start stocking up on the clean drinking water. I'd be buying as much bottled water as I could get my hands on AND bottling up as much of my regular water as I could b/c the likelihood that you'll be without safe drinking water for yourself and your horses is very high.

    I'd even fill up the bathtub with clean water before the storm.

    You need to put your contact information ON the halters themselves - write on nylon halters with permanent markers. Tags will fall off, and anything pinned to the halter will be dangerous in the storm. You also need to write your contact information on the horses themselves - use either the grease pens or a cattle marker. The chances of them losing their halters is also high, so put your name / address / number on them as well. Fly masks are also a necessity to protect their eyes from debris.

    I'd only leave them in the barn if you're 100% certain of the structure's ability to survive the storm without incident. I'd not be that confident, honestly. A category 4 hurricane is likely to destroy your fencing and also possibly your barn or house. If you are in a wooded area with large trees near the barn, be prepared for serious downed limbs - downed trees, also. Would your barn be ok if a tree fell on it?? If not, I honestly think I'd leave them outside.

    Then again, what's your tree / powerline situation OUTSIDE? If you have power lines near your fields or have heavily wooded fields, your horses may be safer inside. Use your best judgment.

    Here is some really good information from a FL web site about preparing horses for a hurricane. I hope you find it helpful: http://www.floridahorse.com/hurricane/hurricane.html Read carefully, as it is packed with really good information!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2004
    Location
    southeast
    Posts
    443

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    I do wish you would reconsider or at least have an alternate plan in case things continue to progress w/ the storm.Since the power is going to beout for a considerable time and it will remain hot make sure you have a lot and I mean a lot of water for horses ,dogs, cats , and you!!!
    I'm sure there will be alot of damage so pack that" horsey" first aide kit and keep it handy maybe too, get some extra feed incase going to the feed store isn't an option.I couldn't reach mine after "FLoyd" due to flooding. Maybe you could consider a tarp to cover the section of the barn where the shavings will blow .I'm not sure it would do much good but if you staple it into place it may aleviate some of the blowing.
    Good luck and stay safe.
    The Winds Of Heaven Are of That Of Which Blows Through A Horses Ears



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2003
    Posts
    9,613



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 27, 2005
    Posts
    12

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    We had a lot of fires in this area last year, and one of the things that was suggested was to write your phone number & name on the horses hooves with a permanent marker. That way if they are taken to a shelter at least you can be contacted & the horse ID'd if he wasn't already tatooed.

    Although if the horse had black hooves, I'm not sure what I'd do. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_c...n_confused.gif



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2003
    Posts
    9,613

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    Remember, also, that EVERYTHING (feed, hay, etc.) must be stored in as high and dry a place as possible in waterproof (and as far as feed is concerned, air tight) containers. Wrap your hay in tarps or plastic so it stays dry. Depending on how used to responding to such weather emergencies your area is, have at least 2 weeks (preferably more) hay / feed there. A medical emergency kit should also be placed with your feed (in waterproof containers).

    Also, remember that snakes and fire ants are going to seek out the highest / dryest places, too. Be careful when going into your hay, as snakes may be hiding between the bales.

    Be REALLY, REALLY careful after the storm, too. There will be powerlines down likely and debris everywhere. Even if you decide to leave the horses out during the storm, I'd keep them in for a few days afterwards until you're absolutely sure your fields are safe and secure.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2003
    Posts
    9,613

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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SBeth:
    .

    Although if the horse had black hooves, I'm not sure what I'd do. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_c...n_confused.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    I think they make silver / gold permanent markers now! Those would work!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
    Location
    Calera, AL
    Posts
    1,890

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    You could haul up to me and stay if you needed to. Wouldn't be a star five hotel but you could get you and your horses out. It's all outside turnout but they seem to do just fine in storms.

    Ivan and Dennis were pretty bad even as far inward as I am. I won't turn down anyone looking for a place to go.

    I put break away halters with my name/number/address/etc on them if I ever have notice of this kind of thing.

    Honestly, if you don't have a place to go - contact me - thrasher @ hiwaay dot net.
    "Dogs are man's best friend. Cats are man's adorable little serial killer." -- theoatmeal.com



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2004
    Location
    Swampland USA
    Posts
    1,577

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    Hey Guys....I think the Swamp is getting ready to be wetter! I live about 40 miles north of New Orleans (about 15 miles south of Baton Rouge). My horses will be out in the pasture here at the house.

    Their halters have name tags but saying a prayer that no trees will fall on the fence, etc.

    Keep us in your prayers...if the storm comes here, hubby will HAVE to go to work. He works at one of the plants on the Mississippi River. His office is about 100 feet from the levy. http://chronicleforums.com/groupee_c...s/icon_eek.gif

    I am a Red Cross shelter volunteer as we have a shelter at our church. If they open our shelter, I will be taking the kids with me. Unfortunately, no animlas allowed. The dogs will be with the neighbor.

    If I lose power, which I am certain I will, I will try somehow to check in....

    Good luck to everyone...New Orleans residents...please leave NOW!

    Elizabeth
    Member of the OTTB Clique, Re-Riders Clique and the Thread Killer Clique.

    http://community.webshots.com/user/esimison



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,379

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    If possible - don't let the shavings get wet if they are going to be any where near the barn.

    A few years ago a hurricane came through Virginia and a barn burned down because folks tried to keep the shavings dry by moving them into the barn. Shavings got wet - spontaneous combustion. Horses died.

    If you've been through hurricanes before you know what to do - the only suggestions I can give is to buy snake shot for your pistol, hook up the trailer just in case you DO need to evacuate, store water - and you may also want to test your well water before drinking it after the storm.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 2, 2002
    Posts
    1,712

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    Please be aware that Katrina has been upgraded to as Cat 5 Hurricane.

    That is catastrophic. Emphasis added.

    Working with FEMA last fall, and talking to folks affected by the storms last fall, I second the view you should evacuate if at all possible.

    If you aren't going to evacuate, do a search on COTH for the hurricane thread from last year; there was a lot of good information, some of which has already been shared with you by COTH folks on this thread.

    Prayer Continues,
    June
    \"The world\'s greatest achievements often happen on the edge of chaos\"



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2002
    Location
    Dodge County, MN
    Posts
    2,939

    Default

    It looks like in Baton Rouge, your going to get the worst of it Monday afternoon/evening. I know that they haven't forecast it, but I think it's going to stay a little west of New Orleans. That's putting it in a direct line for you. Stock up on as much water as you can. Put clean bags in your trash cans and fill them. Same thing with every bucket you can get. Of course tags on the horses. You can also put tags in their manes and tails. I used plain paper, a Sharpie marker and clear box tape. It held pretty well. You also might want to throw the main breaker for your barn, just to minimize fire risk. If your house has natural gas service, turn that off too. When I was a kid, we lived on the coast of NC and I remember many times battening down for various storms. But even my grandma would leave for a Cat.5. Even a Cat.4 We're thinking of you.
    Third Chair in the Viola Clique
    Founder of the Packrats Anonymous Clique
    Proud Member of the Dirty Grey Horse Clique
    http://community.webshots.com/user/pnekman



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2003
    Location
    Kershaw County, SC
    Posts
    434

    Default

    Katrina is now a Cat 5.

    I really, really wish you would evacuate.
    HR/MPL Clique

    "I am villifying you - for God's sake, pay attention!" - Peter O'Toole as Henry II, The Lion in Winter



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2001
    Location
    up the hill from the little river (that floods alarmingly often)
    Posts
    3,590

    Default

    I've been through 7 hurricanes now that have come through Eastern NC. None of those was higher than a 3, and we had a LOT of damage from those.

    Please notify friends/kin who are not in danger where you are, how many people will be staying at your property during the storm, how many horses you have, and any medical conditions/medications you or any other person with you may have. You may also want to put this information in a plastic baggie and keep it on your body just *in case* anything should happen to you and you're unable to give medical personnel important information.

    Fill bathtubs with water, and fill every container you have with water. Tie down EVERYTHING, whether you think it may move or not.

    With 160-mph sustained winds, your lives are at stake here. Please, please leave ... no property is worth your life or the lives of your loved ones. http://chronicleforums.com/images/custom_smilies/no.gif
    Full-time bargain hunter.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2004
    Posts
    4,274

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    Bopper, I just heard on the weather channel that Baton Rouge is not far enough away from landfall to be considered safe. This is a big, strong storm and I beg you to consider evacuating with your horses.



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