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  1. #1
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    Default Another dressage prospect?

    . Deleted. I just thought he was a pretty horse.
    Last edited by paulaedwina; Sep. 4, 2011 at 02:04 PM.
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  2. #2
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    If it's any consolation I think that horse would struggle hugely if asked to do dressage. He just doesn't have the right conformation for it. He's long in the back and the angles in his quarters say he will find it very hard to tuck his croup and sit. The way he canters is odd too. So there you go, a series of reasons to be happy with the one you bought.



  3. #3
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    Oh thank goodness. You knew just what I needed

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  4. #4
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    If you are serious about dedicating yourself to dressage, you might be interested in reading a bit more about horse conformation and movement and what make a horse more or less suited to the task. There are several good books on the subject, as well as websites if you do a google search. If you are just looking to toodle around at first level and below, then sure, any horse could be a "prospect" for you - but if you want to progress and start unlocking the more sophisticated mysteries of dressage you might want to become a bit more discerning.

    This is not to suggest that you should discount "off" breeds for dressage, but you need to understand the conformational challenges associated with each and be able to find the individuals who are the better examples of their breeding from a sport horse perspective.
    Proud COTH lurker since 2001.



  5. #5
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    I was just looking at John's website for kicks. I'm quite happy with Fella. I do like the looks of Freddie though. I'd go check him out if I could figure out how to buy him and board 2 horses!

    As for dressage types of horses. What I understand is that all horses have their conformational challenges -even classical dressage types. From what I've been learning and reading long backs have an easier extending and a harder time collecting, and shorter backs (like Lippies) have an easier time collecting and a harder time extending.

    I've been getting a great deal of insight reading Dietz (Training the Horse in Hand). There is no dressage horse that can do it all. To that end I won't restrict my scope to horses that were bred to it. Even they have challenges.

    JMO of course Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  6. #6
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    Default

    I think Jay R (perch/qh) is the bees knees (top of the page). And I like TBs & Arabs normally.



  7. #7
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    I liked him too. Perch/QH with the perch dapple. I guess I should have posted this in "Off Course" because I like dressage and it's something I'll continue to train in, but I want an all rounder. I think Freddie would make a brilliant all-rounder.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  8. #8
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    Dressage is difficult, why make it more so?

    It costs as much, if not more and is as much work, if not more, to try to bring on the less than suitable horse. Plus it's not fair to the horse to try to make him into something that he's not suited to be.
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    . I think Freddie would make a brilliant all-rounder.

    Paula
    freddie locks his back when he moves, which is undesirable for everything other than saddleseat gaited work.
    I adore saddlebreds, they hold a huge piece of my heart, so this isn't a breed bias or anything.
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  10. #10
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    Thanks, Petstorejunkie. That is not something I was looking at. Is that inherent in the breed? Is it something that can be overcome?

    Carol, I think there is a chasm between dressage horses and horses that are thoroughly unsuitable to any dressage whatsoever. I think many many horses reside in that chasm.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    Thanks, Petstorejunkie. That is not something I was looking at. Is that inherent in the breed? Is it something that can be overcome?

    Carol, I think there is a chasm between dressage horses and horses that are thoroughly unsuitable to any dressage whatsoever. I think many many horses reside in that chasm.

    Paula
    I agree that many horses outside the realm of continental WB's can be successful dressage horses. Many people would say that Sophie resides in that chasm.

    But look at the last pic of Freddie, on the lower right. His hind legs are straight as can be and camped out behind. Do you think he is going to be able to bring them under himself and bend and sit?
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chall View Post
    I think Jay R (perch/qh) is the bees knees (top of the page). And I like TBs & Arabs normally.
    I like him too. Glad I'm not looking but if I were, I'd give him a second look.



  13. #13
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    . Deleted. I just thought he was a pretty horse.
    He is a 'pretty' horse. But that doesn't qualify him as a 'dressage prospect', that is all.



  14. #14
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    Default

    Why delete? There was a lot of good information being given here for people who may want to be learning about conformation and its application in selecting a dressage prospect.



  15. #15
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    Oh dear, does anyone just have a desire to go rescue Freddie from that "rider"? I agree, he's not built for dressage - I think his back is locked to protect himself from the bouncing seat, high hands, and the TARP on his back and dragging off him... But agree he really isn't built for the job - his hind end isn't built to get under him - I know someone who just sold a horse (well bred Warmblood) who had that same ultra-straight hind end - and he was always sore and struggling with the work. And his back is long, I'm guessing you'd have a hard time getting him to use himself well. But...

    But Freddi sure is CUTE, and puts up with a lot. And I'm pretty sure that first canter line was actually a line of crow hopping, so he doesn't seem to have much of a buck in him He looks like a nice all-around horse...

    What does the rider have on his reins? Anyone?

    By the way, I could have sworn I saw MY cat running out of the way just before 2 minutes. What is MY cat doing there?



  16. #16
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    Yeah, I deleted it because I thought he was pretty and would have loved to go test ride him if I had the means to keep a second horse. I think he'd have been fine for lower level dressage - lower level dressage being nothing to sneeze at. I also liked his go and his steadiness. John is the person who sold me Fella. The tarp and such is just to show that he's steady. Like Fella I'd have used him in dressage, competitive trail, maybe even a bit of endurance.

    I deleted it because I wasn't in the right frame of mind to be schooled today.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  17. #17
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MysticOakRanch View Post
    What does the rider have on his reins? Anyone?
    I was wondering that too! It seems to be the same bridle/bit in most of the videos... I'm curious. Does anyone know?

    Paula, if you're still reading I hope you understand that people here are offering genuine advice that could be helpful to you in the long run. While you're correct when you say that there are few horses that are entirely unsuitable to dressage, and no horse is perfect, I have a hunch that your view of conformational strengths and weaknesses is a bit too glossed over... summaries you've read of the pros and cons of general conformational variations should not lead you to disregard the genuine physical flaws that make dressage past first level really truly difficult for some horses. While dressage-informed flatwork WILL help any horse, I don't think it's fair to burden unsuitable horses with the real physical demands of dedicated Dressage. There are a whole host of long term negative effects that can come from choosing the wrong "career" for a particular horse, and I know you are a person who cares deeply for her animals. With that in mind, there is a lot of knowledge on this dressage board that could be of use to you.

    ETA: Sorry Paula, we posted at the same time.
    Last edited by Lost_at_C; Sep. 4, 2011 at 06:14 PM.
    Proud COTH lurker since 2001.



  18. #18
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    The bit ! The white piece looks like plastic/leather folded over for the looped reins. But the bit is very high very tight and looks like its hefty. Does anyone recognize it?



  19. #19
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    I'm not a dressage guru, diva, enthusist (sp) or in any way shape or form dressage minded, BUT.... any horse with basically good conformation can be worth a first, second and third look. See the way they're "packaged" and how it all works for them. Sometimes a conformation flaw doesn't affect the horses ability or talent.

    And in the end it will be their heart and temperament that will see them through the rigors of training.
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    Thanks, Petstorejunkie. That is not something I was looking at. Is that inherent in the breed? Is it something that can be overcome?

    Paula
    I'm sure there are skilled trainers out there that can overcome an inherently locked back; paul writes about overcoming the hover trot in one of his books, but just as our position on the horse starts with our pelvis and radiates out from there, a horses movement starts with the mobility of the back and goes from there. The back being supple yet strong is the first place a good dressage judge looks.
    I'd rather take on a horse that had a mobile back but moved like a sewing machine than one with flashy legs and a locked back.

    I vote you put the ad back up, as this is turning into a really informative thread
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



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