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  1. #1
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    Aug. 27, 2009
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    Default Riding with Bells/Question

    If you are riding your horse with bells around its neck and you move from working trot to a lengthened trot across the diagonal, should the rhythm of the bells stay the same or be longer apart in their sound? hummmmm?



  2. #2
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    Is this a Zen question?



  3. #3
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    Trick question....hmmmmm.



  4. #4
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    Are you going to Banbury Cross?? (Sorry, couldn't resist).

    To answer, yes of course in theory the bells should keep the same rhythm, but in practice there will likely be some small variance.
    Proud COTH lurker since 2001.



  5. #5
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    Dutchess county, NY
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    Rather an interesting question, once I got past the bells. Working to lenthen they should stay the same.

    Collected trot to extended, thinking about what the top international GP horses are showing, the rhthym changes with the extension, getting max. power from the hindquarters and a prolonged period of suspension the rhthym seems to be slower. The trot music always changes in the freestyles although maybe this is for dramatic effect and the change in rhthym is not so perceptible.



  6. #6
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    Is this what your horse is wearing?
    http://www.rhythmbeads.com/Index.html
    I remembered reading about some sort of 'natural' dressage training that involved little bells. What kind of training do you do, which trainer do you follow (or philosophy)?

    Aren't the bells a bit annoying at some point?
    Really just curious. I like music when I ride and I try to pick songs with rythms that suits my horse's gaits. So I understand achieving steadyness thru listening to those little bells but still, after 2-3 minutes, it would drive me nuts!



  7. #7
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    Apr. 5, 2011
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    Rhythmbeads are often used in working with gaited horses.
    Since a gaited horse (no matter what breed) can exhibit up to 16 different gaits, it is very important to develop the correct gaits (footfall!) in the training process.
    The sound of the beads/little bells can help the rider (and the horse) to hear if incorrect steps are being made
    In regards to the original question, I think dudleyc described it very nicely
    Classical Horsemanship



  8. #8
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    Sep. 15, 2006
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    I rode with bells last holiday season just for fun, but I kept using them a bit beyond jan 1 because I did find them a useful and fun rhythm tool. Yes, the rhythm should stay the same in lengthenings.

    Have fun!



  9. #9
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    Jul. 13, 2011
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    East Longmeadow, MA
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    When it's hunting season around here, if I'm going out in the fields I put bells on my horse. And wear bright orange. And sing.



  10. #10
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    Feb. 22, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by alibi_18 View Post
    Is this what your horse is wearing?
    http://www.rhythmbeads.com/Index.html
    I remembered reading about some sort of 'natural' dressage training that involved little bells. What kind of training do you do, which trainer do you follow (or philosophy)?

    Aren't the bells a bit annoying at some point?
    Really just curious. I like music when I ride and I try to pick songs with rythms that suits my horse's gaits. So I understand achieving steadyness thru listening to those little bells but still, after 2-3 minutes, it would drive me nuts!
    I don't think it's confined to any sort of "natural" dressage stuff, as I remember a very classical dressage trainer telling me about his dressage trainer making him ride with bells like 20 years ago. I don't think it's a really common thing, but it seems more personal preference than anything.

    I ride with bells during hunting season as well, and you get used to them really quick. Mine aren't super-loud sleighbells or anything, just a nice rhythmic jingle. I thought it would annoy me too, but it really didn't. YMMV, of course.



  11. #11
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    Aug. 14, 2004
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    but shouldn't the tempo (timing of the footfalls) of the gait remain the same no matter what you are doing?

    ie: collected trot/extended trot, medium trot etc will all have the same "sound" (or should once the horse is trained)

    so to answer the OP: while you are training the horse you will have irregularities of the sound , but you should work to a point where it is the same in all paces within the gait.
    Last edited by mbm; Aug. 30, 2011 at 06:38 PM.



  12. #12
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    Nov. 17, 2001
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    Bryan,Texas
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    You can use "petal" bell boots for the same effect as the bells or beads. Just a diferent sound, if you didn't like/care for bells or beads.

    Not for me but whatevere floats your boat.



  13. #13
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    Aug. 27, 2009
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    Oh, I love these answers except for one. I think the best most true of answers goes to dudleyC.

    DudleyC
    Rather an interesting question, once I got past the bells. Working to lenthen they should stay the same.

    Then there was this answer:

    Lost at C
    Is this a Zen question?

    And this one comes in second:
    UST
    Rhythmbeads are often used in working with gaited horses.
    Since a gaited horse (no matter what breed) can exhibit up to 16 different gaits, it is very important to develop the correct gaits (footfall!) in the training process.
    The sound of the beads/little bells can help the rider (and the horse) to hear if incorrect steps are being made
    In regards to the original question, I think dudleyc described it very nicely

    And then the one that started to pinch my underwear the wrong way a bit:


    alibi18
    Is this what your horse is wearing?
    http://www.rhythmbeads.com/Index.html
    I remembered reading about some sort of 'natural' dressage training that involved little bells. What kind of training do you do, which trainer do you follow (or philosophy)?

    Aren't the bells a bit annoying at some point?
    Really just curious. I like music when I ride and I try to pick songs with rythms that suits my horse's gaits. So I understand achieving steadyness thru listening to those little bells but still, after 2-3 minutes, it would drive me nuts!

    And this one which I think was a good response to the one above.

    Cosmonster
    I don't think it's confined to any sort of "natural" dressage stuff, as I remember a very classical dressage trainer telling me about his dressage trainer making him ride with bells like 20 years ago. I don't think it's a really common thing, but it seems more personal preference than anything.

    I ride with bells during hunting season as well, and you get used to them really quick. Mine aren't super-loud sleighbells or anything, just a nice rhythmic jingle. I thought it would annoy me too, but it really didn't. YMMV, of course.



    For myself, I origonally put bells around my horses neck because I LOVE the sound. It relaxes me. I get tense unknowingly more then I should sometimes. I practice alone so if anything should happen all I have is my cell phone. There's no one around to look and say: Why does she have bells on that horse for?? And even if they did, who cares, its my business. Quite frankly I think it's romantic and I could write an essay on "why" if I had to with no problem.

    However, my reasoning has more to do with how the sound effects me and when I get effected in a neat way that I like ,it shows in my riding. Maybe I feel this way because Im a artist as well. I really think it relaxes my horse too independant of me. I dont put them on all the time, just when Im in the mood and feel like feeling like I'm on a horse out of our time. There's a kind of timeless thing to it.

    But to get to my main point. I was thinking about the rhythm of the bells and weather or not I could even hear if there was a difference in their sound according to what I was doing. Also, Im working at lenghtening my trot, not exstending, and I was thinking , How can I tell if my mare is doing this correctly or not? I know the beat should not change, but if she stretches out a bit wouldnt the bell sound happen longer inbetween durations? If there are 10 chings, (thats what Im calling it) across the diaganol at working trot, wouldnt there something like 7 if you were lengthening correctly? And maybe Im crazy but this sounds like a new method that hasnt really been explored before. So what ever..........it probably isnt, it was just that this idea kind of intriqued me.

    Thanks for all your answers everyone. Its been fun. Molly



  14. #14
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    Mar. 9, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Molly Micvee View Post
    But to get to my main point. I was thinking about the rhythm of the bells and weather or not I could even hear if there was a difference in their sound according to what I was doing. Also, Im working at lenghtening my trot, not exstending, and I was thinking , How can I tell if my mare is doing this correctly or not? I know the beat should not change, but if she stretches out a bit wouldnt the bell sound happen longer inbetween durations? If there are 10 chings, (thats what Im calling it) across the diaganol at working trot, wouldnt there something like 7 if you were lengthening correctly? And maybe Im crazy but this sounds like a new method that hasnt really been explored before. So what ever..........it probably isnt, it was just that this idea kind of intriqued me.

    Thanks for all your answers everyone. Its been fun. Molly
    I think they should stay the same, not lengthen the distance between the "chings" as you lengthen the stride. The tempo should remain the same, just the length of stride changes. So yes, you get fewer "chings" on the diagonal, but the timing between the "chings" does not change.

    And reading that, it makes absolutely no sense. Practice it in your living room...that's what I did.

    Now in REALITY, most folks, even the best o' the best, probably increase the tempo slightly. However if you just watch, rather than listen to the tempo, it may appear to actually slow down because of the longer steps. Perception, it is a funny thing, eh!?
    From now on, ponyfixer, i'll include foot note references.



  15. #15
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    Aug. 14, 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pony Fixer View Post
    I think they should stay the same, not lengthen the distance between the "chings" as you lengthen the stride. The tempo should remain the same, just the length of stride changes. So yes, you get fewer "chings" on the diagonal, but the timing between the "chings" does not change.

    And reading that, it makes absolutely no sense. Practice it in your living room...that's what I did.

    Now in REALITY, most folks, even the best o' the best, probably increase the tempo slightly. However if you just watch, rather than listen to the tempo, it may appear to actually slow down because of the longer steps. Perception, it is a funny thing, eh!?
    ^^^ this is what i was trying to say, only PF said it better.

    so, thanks.



  16. #16
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    Aug. 27, 2009
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    I thought I'd just commit myself and then I can have all the time I need to figure this out. But seriously, Ok. I think.... I need to keep studying this phenomenon then I'll commit myself, ya. thanks but seriously, I think youre right but this idea keeps putting my brain into this weird little knot. I wonder what Steffen Peters would say?



  17. #17
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    I was taught to think of the stride tempo slowing in a longer stride and getting faster in a shorter stride so the trot stays active, and you don't throw the horse onto their shoulder.
    In reality the tempo doesn't change.
    funnily enough what I say to myself inside my head when asking for changes within gait is pretty funny!
    collected: "ting ting ting ting ting ting ting"
    medium: "thump thump thump thump"
    extended: "thowung wung wung wung wung"
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  18. #18
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    Just remember that rhythm and tempo are NOT the same thing! Honestly though I do find it helpful to think of quicker steps in collection and longer, slower steps in mediums. Keeps me from losing the impulsion in collection or speeding up in the mediums.



  19. #19
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    May. 26, 2006
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    Rhythm
    Tempo
    Speed

    Three different measurements of the horse's movement. The bells would tell you about 1&2, and for the lengthenings/extensions, the third is what changes.



  20. #20
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    Rhythm (purity of gait) should be the same, the tempo (repetition) should be relatively the same, perhaps a smudge slower in extension (because of the longer suspension moment/air time). The speed (mph) may be quicker because the horse is covering more ground with each stride (so they would go further in a minute because they are doing so).

    The rhythm of the actual bells (when they are react to the movement of the horse) should stay the same (land/jingle, land/jingle, land, jingle). And when the bells ring they are also different for each gait.
    I.D.E.A. yoda



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