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  1. #1
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    Nov. 13, 2007
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    NW Louisiana
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    Default black walnut tree in pasture?

    OK, so what I thought was a pecan tree is apparently some kind of walnut tree. Not sure if it's black walnut or some other kind of walnut. Is the issue with it strictly bedding, or if they decide to eat it can it cause problems? They wont really even eat the grass around it, and I've never seen them eat the leaves, though they will eat the leaves off the crabapple tree. SO obviously it doesn't taste good.



  2. #2
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    Mar. 6, 2009
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    Default VET SAYS IT IS ONLY THE TREE WOOD THAT IS TOXIC `

    VET SAYS ONLY THE WOOD IS TOXIC

    HORSES SHOULD BE ALRIGHT WITH THE TREES IN PASTURE `` NEVER HAD ANY TROUBLE WITH OURS ``

    SEARCH THIS TOPIC SEVERAL THREADS IN THE PAST ON BLACK WALNUT TREES ` WOOD ` SHAVINGS ...
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 27, 2010
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    OH
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    Default

    One of my neighbors lost two horses very violently by them eating the leaves. They are HIGHLY toxic, and the horses suffered a lot. I would never risk it.



  4. #4
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    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Georgia
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    Default

    Six horses, 4 black walnut trees and not a sign of anything in six years of munching.

    It truly is the oils in the wood that come out when mulched, post tree removal.
    <>< Sorrow Looks Back. Worry Looks Around. Faith Looks Up! -- "When they try to tell you these are your Golden years, don't believe 'em.... It's rust."



  5. #5
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    Nov. 29, 2008
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    Default

    I remember visiting a barn several years ago that had a black walnut tree in the pasture, and when the nuts were dropping, all the horses were eating the nuts and had green foam dripping from their mouths. All the horses survived.

    But someone had since bought that farm, and they pulled out that tree.



  6. #6
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    Jun. 9, 2005
    Location
    Unionville, PA
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    Default

    We had one and had no problem with it, but we did have it removed when we were clearing out some other trees.
    Delaware Park Canter Volunteer
    http://www.canterusa.org/



  7. #7
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    Nov. 13, 2007
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    NW Louisiana
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alterhorse View Post
    I remember visiting a barn several years ago that had a black walnut tree in the pasture, and when the nuts were dropping, all the horses were eating the nuts and had green foam dripping from their mouths. All the horses survived.

    But someone had since bought that farm, and they pulled out that tree.
    Given what the fruit looks like when you peel it off the pit, the green foam does not surprise me one bit

    Since mine don't mess with it at all, I won't worry unless they start looking interested. Don't even know if it's black walnut or not though. I have no idea how to tell. Just know it's a walnut tree.



  8. #8
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    Apr. 7, 2007
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    Tennessee
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by manentail View Post
    One of my neighbors lost two horses very violently by them eating the leaves. They are HIGHLY toxic, and the horses suffered a lot. I would never risk it.
    I watched two of my mares eating leaves off one of the walnut trees last year. Still got the two mares. So it may be dependent on amount. Many articles will say the leaves are not toxic at all if eaten. Some folks say it will kill a horse. I've got two that ate quite a few leaves before I shooed them away and I saw no ill effects. It's the only time I've witnessed them eating them but since I've always had walnut trees in pastures I'm sure it wasn't the only time.



  9. #9
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    Jul. 2, 2003
    Location
    Woodland, Ca
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    Default

    Black walnut has a stem with lots of skinny leaves coming off of it. English walnut has big more oval shaped leaves.



  10. #10
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    Aug. 27, 2010
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    OH
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    Default

    Of course we could argue that any leaves are toxic when they are dying and falling off. The horses my neighbor had did die in the fall.



  11. #11
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    PA
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    Default

    We have black walnut trees all over around my farm. Biggest issues we've ever had are being beaned with the nuts that fall out of the trees onto your head. Oh yes, and the mostly white pinto pony who was a pro at rolling on said fallen nuts and creating some lovely stains. You'd have to wait for the next shed to get rid of them - even clipping didn't remove them entirely because the little monster ground them clear into his skin!
    ~ A true friend knows all there is to know about you and still likes you. -E. Hubbard



  12. #12
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Default

    We have several, but they are fenced off. I believe the problem is the wood, if you have to cut down fallen branches, be very, very careful about the sawdust. We had to cut up a fallen tree, just fenced off the whole area.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  13. #13
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    Dec. 14, 2007
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    Wilsonville, Ontario, CANADA
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    We have black walnut trees all over around my farm. Biggest issues we've ever had are being beaned with the nuts that fall out of the trees onto your head


    Yup = got that right!!!

    We have THOUSANDS and I mean THOUSANDS around our farm, bordering the pastures, the paddocks and the hay fields. I used to be paranoid about them years ago - not any more. They are messy and a PITA to clean up after, but havent seen a horse turn green (literally or figuratively speaking! ) by being in such close proximity to so many of them

    Relax ... you'll be fine - so will your horses ...



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 18, 2008
    Location
    Ohio, USA
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    631

    Default

    By chance - has anyone on this thread read the "Slobbers" thread today?



  15. #15
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    Aug. 10, 2010
    Location
    Western NY
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    Default not worth the risk

    My arab foundered when boarding at a place that had black walnuts in the pasture. They were vigilant about picking up the nuts, but I think he was exposed to the toxin by walking on the exposed roots of the tree.



  16. #16
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    Jul. 21, 2011
    Location
    Logsden, Oregon, USA
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    13

    Default black walnut toxicity

    If I'm not mistaken, I remember reading an account of horses bedded on black walnut shavings, and the horses absorbing toxins through their hooves... I would say if you are using shavings be sure you know the source and avoid any "miscellaneous wood" shavings (here in the PNW we can get cedar, pine, or sometimes "unidentified" wood shavings ... we stick with cedar!)

    By the way if anyone is trying to identify a black walnut as opposed to an English walnut ~ or actually any kind of tree, come to think of it ~ you can google "images" for most any tree/shrub/plant and find pretty good photos of leaves, nuts, general tree shapes, and you can also find out where they grow, etc.



  17. #17
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    Feb. 24, 2005
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    2,268

    Default

    I had a black walnut tree in the pasture some years ago. My qh mare foundered on it. I wouldn't have a black walnut tree on any property I had, even outside of the pasture.

    I never saw her eating near it either - and the vet didn't tell me that it was a problem - he just didn't know way back then.

    That is what black walnut trees do - they founder horses.



  18. #18
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    Nov. 13, 2007
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    NW Louisiana
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    For those of you saying it causes founder, how do you know it was the black walnut tree? My mare almost foundered on lush spring grass, and there are many other reasons a horse can founder. Just because the tree is there doesn't mean it's going to cause the horse to founder unless there is some kind of contact there, especially since so many people have said they have never had an issue...

    Correlation does not equal causation and all that jazz.



  19. #19
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    Apr. 7, 2007
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    Tennessee
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hampton Bay View Post
    For those of you saying it causes founder, how do you know it was the black walnut tree? My mare almost foundered on lush spring grass, and there are many other reasons a horse can founder. Just because the tree is there doesn't mean it's going to cause the horse to founder unless there is some kind of contact there, especially since so many people have said they have never had an issue...

    Correlation does not equal causation and all that jazz.
    Absolutely. There are so many causes I don't know how someone would know. Unless the horse was on a dry lot and all that was in the lot was a black walnut tree. And it of course might be dependent on the horse. Just like chocolate is toxic to dogs. I've had dogs eat Snickers bars and one dog got into an entire box of Valentine chocolates before. Never even made them sick. Just as an example. I just think some horses are more susceptible to certain toxins. Of course, in the case of shavings I think it will founder any and every horse that you put on it. But for a naturally standing tree, it depends.

    If the tree has been out there for years with no problems, I wouldn't worry about it. And if anything, I would probably just fence it off. Cutting it down and having the sawdust go all over the ground would DEFINITELY cause you problems. I'd be of the mind to just not mess with it besides fencing it off. There is nothing wrong with being cautious.



  20. #20
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    Jun. 1, 2002
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    Indiana
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    11,084

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HPFarmette View Post
    My arab foundered when boarding at a place that had black walnuts in the pasture. They were vigilant about picking up the nuts, but I think he was exposed to the toxin by walking on the exposed roots of the tree.
    Ok, this doesn't make any sense to me.

    Are you saying he stood on a root long enough for the toxins to be absorbed up through his feet? That sounds impossible.



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