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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,420

    Default Preferences for trailering in a 24ft stock trailer

    for the skiddish horse

    what have you found is the best way to help the horse acclimate to the trailer.

    do you tie, or leave loose? why?

    do you close in smallest area, or leave room to move? why?

    do you find most horses ride backwards if left to choose? why do you think that is?

    I have to haul a very skiddish horse in a big 24 ft stock trailer

    ETA - have a protective face mask, helmet, and leg wraps



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,380

    Default

    I want him tied, so he can't throw himself around as much. Does this horse tie at all? I would not tie if he will go berserk, injure himself, go down in the trailer. I would leave a dragging lead rope on if he can't be tied, for getting hold of him at destination. Make sure trailer is WELL BEDDED for his good footing with mats and deep sawdust wetted to prevent dust, where he will ride. NO straw bedding, REALLY slippery in trailers. A flake of hay in the corner, NO nets or bags hung to tangle in.

    But leaving them loose can cause other issues. A moving (fighting) load will often cause problems with the truck, handling problems. Weight moving from side to side, back to front, suddenly, violently, wiith force is dangerous. I would not give him more than one section of trailer to stand in. So close the center gate to give him about a box stall sized place, tied or loose.

    Big trailer length is a help to you, but horse can still affect the towing vehicle steering and handling. I drive commercially and we are NOT ALLOWED to have an unsecured load in or on that truck. Very dangerous if it gets moving while traveling the roads and they will ticket you. And that is just "cargo" not a reactive horse!

    Any chance you and trailer could go visit horse ahead of time and practice loading, feeding him inside with no other goals? He can wear his equipment, have a fun meal inside, come in and out several times, as easily as possible while you have no rush to go anyplace. You open doors, shut doors, open them again, without moving trailer at all, so he might be a bit eased to load for you when the "real time" comes later.

    Check trailer VERY CAREFULLY for any sharp welds, rivets, splinters, or sharp edges horse could get cut on while in his trailer compartment. Cuts can often be avoided if you check ahead. Defiantely a head bumper and one of those neat leather face masks will probably be real helpful Maybe a double halter setup for safety, if he should rearrange one with the bumper on it so he is not securely haltered with only one.

    Hope he LOVES your more open trailer and you got worried for nothing. Let us know how it goes.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2007
    Location
    Rising Sun, MD
    Posts
    3,601

    Default

    Is is a GN or BP? If a GN, I would close the partition to make a box stall up front and leave him loose in there with hay on the ground. If no partition I would tie him with a hay bag (not a net if he's prone to being silly in the trailer)
    If a BP- definitely tie!
    And yes, any horse I've ever hauled loose (cameras in the truck so I can see) has faced backwards at a slant with their butt towards the drivers side.
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2000
    Location
    Chesterland, OH USA
    Posts
    2,769

    Default

    what have you found is the best way to help the horse acclimate to the trailer.
    -be calm, load up, drive carefully, provide high value treats

    do you tie, or leave loose? why?
    -Tie. Otherwise my horse will lean to look out the sides of the trailer and will make the whole trailer move around. Also dangerous when you open the door if you horse is loose.

    do you close in smallest area, or leave room to move? why?
    -I think most horses ride better when they have something to lean against, so smaller is better. YMMV.

    do you find most horses ride backwards if left to choose? why do you think that is?
    -My horse has NEVER chosen to ride backwards, even when left untied. He also never rode at a slant. He always faced forwards. One time I tied him so he was backwards (long story) and he moved around a lot so I don't think he liked it.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2010
    Posts
    574

    Default

    If you put shavings down in a stock trailer they are just going to fly around and could possibly spook a nervous horse, plus get in his eyes and nose.

    I tried it once, put down a nice deep bed of shavings for my horses, when we stopped the first time to get gas the horses were covered in shavings as was our gear and the floor was bare!

    You can't really wet them enough (unless you completely saturate them) to stop them from becoming airborne!

    Shavings are great in enclosed trailers with limited air flow.
    Proud Native Texan!
    owned by 3 Cardigan Corgi's + 3 wonderful horses!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2007
    Location
    Rising Sun, MD
    Posts
    3,601

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pcostx View Post
    If you put shavings down in a stock trailer they are just going to fly around and could possibly spook a nervous horse, plus get in his eyes and nose.

    I tried it once, put down a nice deep bed of shavings for my horses, when we stopped the first time to get gas the horses were covered in shavings as was our gear and the floor was bare!

    You can't really wet them enough (unless you completely saturate them) to stop them from becoming airborne!

    Shavings are great in enclosed trailers with limited air flow.

    It really depends on the your trailer I guess, I bed my stock trailer with shavings and it does not fly around. I've actually ridden in the back at highway speed to check- and nope, it doesn't go anywhere, none on the horses either.
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2010
    Posts
    1,435

    Default

    Horses ride in box stalls across country and do just fine.

    If a partition will give them a box stall and it is a gn trailer or your driver is an experienced hauler you should be fine. A bp with an good driver and the horse upfront is best.

    When left loose in box stalls or stock trailers my horses ALL rode backwards.

    I would NOT leave a lead rope on the horse. You can hopefully pull into a paddock or arena if your horse is that upset. Otherwise a treat should bring them close enough to snap a line on them before exiting the trailer.



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