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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
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    10,362

    Default Drool? (No, not with the bit)

    So, I thought he was just being slobbery with the bit yesterday. He did that at least once last year with the kimberwicke, I'm using it again, figured yesterday that was just tongue action. Today, I brought him in, had him in the cross ties, and while I"m grooming, he suddenly just drops a mouthful of liquid on the floor! Looked clear, didn't smell funny, I know horses can't vomit, I figured, okay, maybe he'd grabbed a mouthful of water in the field...I offered him a drink, he didn't want any, I go back to grooming.

    He does it AGAIN.

    Okay. I decide to lunge him first with the halter and see if he's slobbering while he's moving. Yep. (Also, looks stiff on the right front; I swear, I do not imagine this when I'm riding, but apparently I'm the only one who notices these things.) So, I decide to do a nice long hand walk around the track. I stop him at the 'scary' corner (near the road) and let him eat, he's eating fine, chewing fine, eventually we work our way back to the barn.

    Standing in the crossties he does it again!

    I notice, he has what looks like pollen on his nose. There are weeds in the pastures they're eating around that look like ragweed. And every HUMAN I know is having allergy issues. He seems to be eating fine, he isn't showing any other symptoms or odd behavior. Yes, he's had his rabies shot.

    Is this a weird allergy symptom? There's pollen, and I just (yesterday) switched him to Bronco fly spray as the homemade stuff wasn't cutting it, plus there are about a million biting flies right now. He just finished a round of Finish Line's Gastro-Aid liquid supplement--is it a weird ulcer symptom of some kind? Worth calling the vet? HE doesn't seem to be at all bothered, but I was sufficiently weirded out.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 15, 2009
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
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    Default

    It's slobbers, caused by eating clover. It's not harmful, just a bit gross.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2011
    Location
    Area 1
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    253

    Default

    Yup, clovers. Don't worry about it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Coreene View Post
    The very sad merit badge earned by a true horsewoman: the one where she puts the horse before herself. The most gracious final reward any horse can hope for, and lucky are those horses who receive it.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
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    Michigan
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    Default

    That would explain it. I've never seen him do that, but the clover IS in bloom. My old horse never did that, though he WOULD get a mouthful of water, hold it for longer than you would think possible, and drop it, but obviously he couldn't do that without reloading.

    See, always ask on COTH. Someone will know.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
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    Default

    Clover slobbers.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 8, 2010
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    Default

    It is not actually caused by clover. It is caused by a fungus that in certain years grows on the clover. This same fungus can also grow on alfalfa. If you are feeding bailed hay it can be baled into the hay or alfalfa and cause issues for us to a year as it slowly dies off. You should remove your horse from the pasture until it clears up or stop feeding them that batch of hay.



  7. #7
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    Feb. 6, 2000
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    MA
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    Default

    Or you could simply make sure the horse has free access to water.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 15, 2009
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    Knoxville, TN
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    Default

    My three get slobbers to varying degrees. I don't know if some horses are more disposed to slobbers, or if some horses just eat more of the affected clover. Either way, it's not a problem, other than you will end up w/ lots of ruined clothes if they drool green buckets of slob on you.



  9. #9
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    Sep. 8, 2010
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ghazzu View Post
    Or you could simply make sure the horse has free access to water.
    I would certainly take them off pasture or whatever is causing it. It is an actual poisoning and it should be removed. If a horse is left with the irritant it is believed to cause founder and colic in some horse and could be cruel to leave a horse in that condition if severely effected by the drooling.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
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    Default

    As I said, he doesn't seem bothered by it. It's just odd-looking. They get fed the hay grown on the property (timothy and alfalfa mix--pretty low alfalfa, to my eye, but that's what they grow), so it's either this year's first cutting or the last of last year's. They have water all day, so they can drink when they like. There isn't any other pasture to put the horses on, so I'll mention it to the BO, but it's not like there's anywhere else to turn them out.



  11. #11
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    Jul. 20, 2007
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    Rising Sun, MD
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    Quote Originally Posted by davistina67 View Post
    I would certainly take them off pasture or whatever is causing it. It is an actual poisoning and it should be removed. If a horse is left with the irritant it is believed to cause founder and colic in some horse and could be cruel to leave a horse in that condition if severely effected by the drooling.
    LOL! Then pretty much every horse in the mid-Atlantic should be dropping dead every summer.

    Clover drools- no big deal other than the ick factor
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  12. #12
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    Sep. 8, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by tabula rashah View Post
    LOL! Then pretty much every horse in the mid-Atlantic should be dropping dead every summer.

    Clover drools- no big deal other than the ick factor
    Lol, do what you want if you want to be cruel to your horse and possibly endanger them. I don't know of a vet that says keep poisoning your horse. Maybe you use some different vet!!!



  13. #13
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    Jul. 20, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by davistina67 View Post
    Lol, do what you want if you want to be cruel to your horse and possibly endanger them. I don't know of a vet that says keep poisoning your horse. Maybe you use some different vet!!!
    I am quite curious how allowing your horse to drool is cruel- that is just ridiculous. And I believe you have said before you are from CO, yes? Here clover drools are the norm, maybe you have a different kind out west? Here it's just what happens in summer- I'm pretty sure our vets (which BTW include some of the top sporthorse vets in the country as well as New Bolton) know what they are talking about and I'm also not talking redneck, backyard owners- I'm pretty sure we wouldn't just let the $1M FEI horses be poisoned LMAO
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by tabula rashah View Post
    I am quite curious how allowing your horse to drool is cruel- that is just ridiculous. And I believe you have said before you are from CO, yes? Here clover drools are the norm, maybe you have a different kind out west? Here it's just what happens in summer- I'm pretty sure our vets (which BTW include some of the top sporthorse vets in the country as well as New Bolton) know what they are talking about and I'm also not talking redneck, backyard owners- I'm pretty sure we wouldn't just let the $1M FEI horses be poisoned LMAO
    You do know that it is not the clover that causes the drool right? The horse drools so much that they can not swallow it all. Maybe you are seriously confused. There is only one kind of slobbers, doesn't matter where you live. I have never heard of a vet saying it's ok to poison your horse, your vet tells you that it is ok? Would love to have your vets name! If your vet wants to let 1mil FEI horses be poisened then good luck to them! That's just stupid.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
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    13

    Default

    Yep, your guy has the clover slobbers. As someone pointed out they are in fact caused by a fungus growing on the clover and not the clover itself (a fact I only learned a few years ago). Two of our horses have it all during the summer, no matter what field we move them to or what hay we put them on. Since they are both in their twenties and have been at this farm since they were five, I would hazard to say it hasn't had any ill effects on their health. The only thing I do to be proactive when I see a horse is slobbering is to add extra electrolytes to one of their water buckets. I don't know if drooling that much can cause dehydration, but I figure its better to be on the safe side, especially during this summer we've been having.
    "Four things greater than all things are,
    Women and Horses and Power and War."

    - Rudyard Kipling, The Ballad of the King's Jest



  16. #16
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    Jul. 20, 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by davistina67 View Post
    You do know that it is not the clover that causes the drool right? The horse drools so much that they can not swallow it all. Maybe you are seriously confused. There is only one kind of slobbers, doesn't matter where you live. I have never heard of a vet saying it's ok to poison your horse, your vet tells you that it is ok? Would love to have your vets name! If your vet wants to let 1mil FEI horses be poisened then good luck to them! That's just stupid.
    Um, yes I understand that it is not the clover itself that causes the drooling. And I am not seriously confused- I was poking fun at you (which you never seem to get when people do LOL!). And no I won't give you the vet's name (although I did give you NBC) because I don't spout off about where I work on the COTH. I am sure there are horses that could have unusually strong reactions, but in the general populous of horses here they are fine, no one pulls them off pasture- not the big TB farms, not the big sporthorse farms, not the vets
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  17. #17
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    Sep. 8, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by tabula rashah View Post
    Um, yes I understand that it is not the clover itself that causes the drooling. And I am not seriously confused- I was poking fun at you (which you never seem to get when people do LOL!). And no I won't give you the vet's name (although I did give you NBC) because I don't spout off about where I work on the COTH. I am sure there are horses that could have unusually strong reactions, but in the general populous of horses here they are fine, no one pulls them off pasture- not the big TB farms, not the big sporthorse farms, not the vets
    Guess you people from the east like to gamble a bit more then the vets or the people from the west do. Instructions are to always pull them off the pasture or stop feeding the hay. Not worth the chance of killing a horse or being cruel to them.



  18. #18
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    Jul. 20, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by davistina67 View Post
    Guess you people from the east like to gamble a bit more then the vets or the people from the west do. Instructions are to always pull them off the pasture or stop feeding the hay. Not worth the chance of killing a horse or being cruel to them.
    Yep, that's me always playing Russian roulette my horses- letting them drool, letting them eat round bales, have their teeth done without tranqs by a guy without power tools, have script meds on hand that I can give by my own judgement.... By your standards my horses should be dropping dead daily
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by tabula rashah View Post
    Yep, that's me always playing Russian roulette my horses- letting them drool, letting them eat round bales, have their teeth done without tranqs by a guy without power tools, have script meds on hand that I can give by my own judgement.... By your standards my horses should be dropping dead daily
    Hey. Makes no difference to me if you don't want to give your horses quality care. There are many people that read these boards that need advice. Your standard of care would certainly not be considered high. You sound very "backyardish" with the way you care for your horses.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
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    Oh, dear Dog.
    I've been in practice over 20 years, and I've seen a lot of horses with slobbers, and never seen or heard of a case that had more than a bucket of drool.

    Must be a virulent strain of fungus in your neighborhood.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



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