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  1. #1
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    Default What Tidbits of Knowledge have You Gleaned, Lately?

    Keeping in mind the timeless adage, ‘you never stop learning about horses’, have you learned something new/interesting/revolutionary, recently? Something that made you go “WTH? Why didn’t I know THAT?? “ (go on, you can admit it)

    In my case, the vet was out for floats and coggins earlier in the week. When, I mentioned the hooks on the upper corner incisors of a soon-to-be 8 yr old mare, he called them ‘7-yr hooks’ and they would go away on their own. HUH?? In all my 45+ years with horses, I had never heard that term…ever. Not while studying teeth in equine science class or during countless dentals over the years. Naturally, the skeptic in me couldn’t wait to google…because, after all, isn’t Google the ultimate authority when seeking answers for all of life's important questions...or, something like that? Sure enough, found all sorts of information on 7-yr hooks…wow.

    On the other hand, my vet learned something new, as well. While commenting on the random white spots another mare develops after shedding out, and referring to them as ‘birdcatcher spots’, he asked “What are you calling them?” Seems, he had never heard THAT term (phrase?), before. Wonder if he was slightly skeptical and couldn’t wait to google at the end of the day?

    Now, would someone please explain HOW '7-yr hooks' go away on their own…?
    Is it me or do 99.9% of cowboys just look better with their hats on?
    <><



  2. #2
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    Jul. 31, 2009
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    Default Cobra venom?

    I'll play, since I just learned about this today. Apparently there are people that will have their horse's feet injected with cobra venom. The person telling me about this said it is done in the harness racing world, as well as in the WP circles, that she knows of. Of course, this is not to say that it doesn't happen in other disciplines. The rationale is that the venom, once injected, numbs the nerves, so that a foot sore horse, from say, a too short trim, can still be kept in work during the weeks that it will take for the foot to grow out and stop hurting.

    Of course, this "treatment" can be used to hide other issues, like soreness from a fractured coffin bone, navicular issues, etc. Additionally, one would have to find a vet willing to perform the injection as well.
    Last edited by ex-racer owner; Apr. 9, 2011 at 06:24 PM. Reason: took out a partial sentence left in by mistake.



  3. #3
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    Default

    Thanks for posting. Beginning to think I was the only one that didn't know everything.

    The cobra venom thing sounds vaguely familiar (maybe in use for humans?). Wasn't aware of its use in horses. Makes me wonder...WHERE does a vet get cobra venom? And does it test?
    Is it me or do 99.9% of cowboys just look better with their hats on?
    <><



  4. #4
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    Feb. 28, 2006
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    Default

    Cobra venom would be the Cats Don't Dance and Wild Eyed and Wicked case, there's also a racehorse trainer that got busted recently. I think venoms are available for veterinary pro's to purchase, same as antivenoms.

    I didn't realize that wolf teeth and canines weren't the same thing, and the dentist told me that mares had both(?) too. I'm still a bit befuddled by that, obviously.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KSAQHA View Post
    Thanks for posting. Beginning to think I was the only one that didn't know everything.
    Don't worry, I don't know everything, I just haven't learned any interesting tidbits lately. I love the thread idea, though!



  6. #6
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KSAQHA View Post
    Keeping in mind the timeless adage, ‘you never stop learning about horses’, have you learned something new/interesting/revolutionary, recently? Something that made you go “WTH? Why didn’t I know THAT?? “ (go on, you can admit it)

    In my case, the vet was out for floats and coggins earlier in the week. When, I mentioned the hooks on the upper corner incisors of a soon-to-be 8 yr old mare, he called them ‘7-yr hooks’ and they would go away on their own. HUH?? In all my 45+ years with horses, I had never heard that term…ever. Not while studying teeth in equine science class or during countless dentals over the years. Naturally, the skeptic in me couldn’t wait to google…because, after all, isn’t Google the ultimate authority when seeking answers for all of life's important questions...or, something like that? Sure enough, found all sorts of information on 7-yr hooks…wow.

    On the other hand, my vet learned something new, as well. While commenting on the random white spots another mare develops after shedding out, and referring to them as ‘birdcatcher spots’, he asked “What are you calling them?” Seems, he had never heard THAT term (phrase?), before. Wonder if he was slightly skeptical and couldn’t wait to google at the end of the day?

    Now, would someone please explain HOW '7-yr hooks' go away on their own…?
    The 7 year old hooks are part of how permanent teeth erupt and change, but what is called "hooks" generally is those that form on permanent molars and may cause cheek sores.
    When you mention hooks, you need to be specific which ones.

    I just learned that you really can't have others look at horses for you, because no one can read your mind good enough for that.



  7. #7
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    Dec. 2, 2004
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    Default

    I just learned how good dung beetles are for your pastures on another thread -- they help aerate and fertilize the soil. Now I've seen them at work in my stalls but I had never given any thought to them out in the fields. I also learned that ivermectin kills them, why the poster was looking to purchase some beetles to re-establish her population.
    Some day I'm going to tell my grandkids that I am older than the internet and blow their minds.



  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    The 7 year old hooks are part of how permanent teeth erupt and change, but what is called "hooks" generally is those that form on permanent molars and may cause cheek sores.
    When you mention hooks, you need to be specific which ones.
    Well, I DID mention 'upper corner incisors'. To futher elaborate..."sharp 'points' usually develop on the outside of the upper cheekteeth (grinders) and the inside of the lower cheekteeth. 'Hooks' commonly occur on the front of the first upper cheekteeth (second upper premolars), or at the posterior end of the last lower molars".

    I'm still trying to figure out how the 7-yr hook goes away, when it doesn't have anything to grind against on the lower incisor.

    Cos - thanks for the moral support, anyway.

    PonyGma - I don't recall ever seeing dung beetles around here..but, I don't really study poops TOO closely. I'm mostly about consistency and texture. Wonder if they're mainly a regional insect?
    Last edited by KSAQHA; Apr. 10, 2011 at 09:34 PM. Reason: spelling
    Is it me or do 99.9% of cowboys just look better with their hats on?
    <><



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    I didn't realize that wolf teeth and canines weren't the same thing, and the dentist told me that mares had both(?) too. I'm still a bit befuddled by that, obviously.
    Not overly common in mares, but some do get the canines!

    And talk about befuddled...I was also told wolf teeth can come out on their own. Anyone?
    Is it me or do 99.9% of cowboys just look better with their hats on?
    <><



  10. #10
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    ---"I'm still trying to figure out how the 7-yr hook goes away, when it doesn't have anything to grind against on the lower incisor."---

    Horses chew side to side also.

    Some times, a wolf tooth is so loose you can pull it out with your fingers.
    Our vet did so once.



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by KSAQHA View Post

    Cos - thanks for the morale support, anyway.
    No problem...I'm going to be seeing someone tomorrow who always gives me interesting tidbits, so hopefully I can contribute more then!



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Horses chew side to side also.

    Some times, a wolf tooth is so loose you can pull it out with your fingers.
    Our vet did so once.
    Yes, dear Bluey, I'm somewhat familiar with how horses masticate, but you did get me thinking. The hook hangs down at the back of the upper incisor...behind the back of the bottom incisor when the jaw is closed. So, apparently, it must get ground away from front to back by the side-to-side action of the lower jaw. It doesn't seem to make contact any other way (i.e. grinding surface to grinding surface).

    My one mare's wolf teeth must have vamoosed on their own, because she no longer has them. The last time I had her checked, one hadn't quite erupted so vet said to wait. On the other hand, that's a lot better than the major wrestling match...along with hunks of gum and bloodiness...it took to extract the wolf teeth of the last couple of mares I had done.

    Hey, Cos - here's a tidbit I picked up from the weekend. A semi-deflated mylar balloon makes a wonderful desensitizing tool...especially in 30-mph wind gusts.
    Is it me or do 99.9% of cowboys just look better with their hats on?
    <><



  13. #13
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KSAQHA View Post
    I'm still trying to figure out how the 7-yr hook goes away, when it doesn't have anything to grind against on the lower incisor.
    I think part of it is due to the gradual change in angle of the incisors as the horse ages.



  14. #14
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    Oct. 2, 2001
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    Greenville, SC
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    ---"I'm still trying to figure out how the 7-yr hook goes away, when it doesn't have anything to grind against on the lower incisor."---

    Horses chew side to side also.
    The hooks on the upper corner incisors have more to do with the changing "angle of incidence" as the horse ages. In young horses the jaws are very up and down and as they age they become more sloping. Its that changing angle that creates the hooks. They can get them at 11 and sometimes 13 too.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duramax View Post
    The hooks on the upper corner incisors have more to do with the changing "angle of incidence" as the horse ages. In young horses the jaws are very up and down and as they age they become more sloping. Its that changing angle that creates the hooks. They can get them at 11 and sometimes 13 too.
    Yes, but at seven they are clearly pointy, later more like a round protuberance.

    The occlusion angle keeps changing from almost 180 to more accute, but not that much until past 15.

    I expect the way all changes depends on several factors, not just one.

    Many years ago in Europe, barn managers were the ones to do basic teeth floating.
    Generally the vet taught some classes on teeth and the barn manager taught apprentices hands on later.
    We found all kinds of mouths and if something seemed odd, we had a vet look at that and do whatever needed doing that was more than basic stuff.
    Since most horses were kept under similar management, teeth tended to look similar also.
    In the USA, horses are kept stabled or turned out, fed more or less hay, gaze part of the time or 24/7, more horses turned out in groups and so more injuries.
    Teeth reflect that, you can see many more different mouths, very interesting the surprises you come across.



  16. #16
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    Fix it forward really works
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by KSAQHA View Post
    Not overly common in mares, but some do get the canines!

    And talk about befuddled...I was also told wolf teeth can come out on their own. Anyone?
    For ReSomething: Canines are the sort of tubular and sometimes pointy teeth that resides in the bar area in the mouth. Wolf teeth are tiny little pointy teeth that are directly in front of the molars.

    Wolf teeth are so small and often not deeply rooted, so yes.. they can come out on their own. If not they are usually not too hard for the vet or dentist to pop out.
    2016 RRP Makeover Competitor www.EnviousBid.com



  18. #18
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    I'm sure I've learned a lot lately, with having a sick horse from auction quarantined. Also having a 3 yr old TB gelded and the spring vet and dental stuff... but I guess I just haven't had enough coffee yet to think of exactly what...
    2016 RRP Makeover Competitor www.EnviousBid.com



  19. #19
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    I've known this one for a long time, but it's still pretty cool!

    Horses can "grow" up to 2" in height by getting fit. The forelegs have no skeletal connection to the rest of the body and the horse's body is suspended in a sling of muscles and ligaments between the front legs. As the horse gets fit the sling tightens up, lifting the horse's body to produce the "growth".



  20. #20
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    Yep - I now know the differences between sorrel, red dun, buckskin, and dun. My western friends confused me for the longest time!
    Blugal

    You never know what kind of obsessive compulsive crazy person you are until another person imitates your behaviour at a three-day. --Gry2Yng



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