The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2007
    Posts
    1,310

    Default Emerging Athletes Program Survey-So Important

    I received this morning, on behalf of my adopted daughter, an email from USHJA regarding the EAP (Emerging Athletes Program) program. It was a survey which, best I can tell, is seeking responses to know how costly it is for the riders to actually get to EAP to participate (horse cost, travel cost, attendance costs). It also looks like maybe they are taking our 2010 suggestions to ease those costs and make the program more than 2 days. I hope I am reading into the questions correctly because less cost for travel and bringing a horse and also more days for the riders would be amazing.

    I like that the USHJA is appearing to find ways to reduce the costs for riders to attend, if i'm right, because then more kids can go.

    So please, please, EAP participants and parents, don't delay in answering the survey. Go check your inbox and be sure you got a survey.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Posts
    2,607

    Default

    I noticed that some schools have hosted EAP -- Seems like a win-win opportunity to me -- EAP attracts riders/auditors that the schools might want to recruit, and this is the first exposure many of the riders/auditors get to the campus --

    Scheduling EAP sessions when dormitory housing is available at the schools could help with lodging cost -- Even if they can't schedule it during a school break, I'd hope there would be students (eq team members?) willing to share space in their dorm room with a participant --
    "I never mind if an adult uses safety stirrups." GM



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2007
    Posts
    1,310

    Default

    DAB that is an interesting comment about schools but oddly they have still charged for stalls and shavings, or at least the places we attended. They gave no freebies but certainly a bargaining chip



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2007
    Posts
    299

    Default

    Is there a list posted for the second round anywhere?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2004
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    1,270

    Default

    The Level I EAP we attended in TN was amazing, free stalls, shaving, meals... the hosts were so welcoming and made the experience such a pleasure. Iconn was the host. Will definatly be returning next year.
    Fullcirclefarmsc.com



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 12, 2010
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    414

    Default

    I thought that program was supposed to also help find the 'diamond in the rough' grassroots kids.

    I think if it's not cheap, they should have at least 2 scholarship positions for kids that can't afford it or don't own a horse.
    www.TackMeUp.com
    'What's in your trunk?'
    Free tools for Trainers and Riders



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2011
    Posts
    349

    Default

    I like this idea. I really wanted to try out, but I didn't have a horse to try out on! Then I figured even if I found one, I wouldn't be able to afford to go.

    Quote Originally Posted by Give and Take View Post
    I thought that program was supposed to also help find the 'diamond in the rough' grassroots kids.

    I think if it's not cheap, they should have at least 2 scholarship positions for kids that can't afford it or don't own a horse.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2011
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    2,496

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Give and Take View Post
    I thought that program was supposed to also help find the 'diamond in the rough' grassroots kids.
    I did it this year, and what I got from the mother of the girl who got to nationals is that its more of an opportunity to make connections and get kids exposure to professionals who they otherwise would never get an opportunity to ride with.

    The program was expensive for me because I leased a horse...a lease on a 1.20m horse for a week is not cheap! I was actually a little frustrated because we did not jump over 3ft. I understand Melanie's rationale and it made perfect sense (anyone can do the height on the right horse) but then I could have also leased a 3ft horse for A LOT less money.

    Oh well, something to know for next year (if I make it again!) It was an awesome experience that I really hope to repeat



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2005
    Posts
    298

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Give and Take View Post
    I thought that program was supposed to also help find the 'diamond in the rough' grassroots kids.

    I think if it's not cheap, they should have at least 2 scholarship positions for kids that can't afford it or don't own a horse.
    Everything I have read about it has indicated this too. It kind of perplexes me in some ways. I don't know that in reality the EAP is focused toward the grassroots kids at all.
    Friend of bar.ka



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 12, 2010
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    414

    Default

    i mentioned it to a friend who's a trainer and she said trainers started to see it as an opportunity for their students to get exposure, so there became more trainer involvement than the program originally planned for.

    i think they should definitely try to find those kids willing to ride anything with hair on it and give them a shot. Finding clinic horses for these kids should be the responsibility of the hosting barn or clinician. I know another trainer who loaned a horse to one of the riders for the weekend a couple years ago.
    www.TackMeUp.com
    'What's in your trunk?'
    Free tools for Trainers and Riders



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2000
    Location
    Southern Pines, N.C.
    Posts
    11,421

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Give and Take View Post
    I thought that program was supposed to also help find the 'diamond in the rough' grassroots kids.

    I think if it's not cheap, they should have at least 2 scholarship positions for kids that can't afford it or don't own a horse.
    I could get behind this kind of idea. What I cannot support is scholarships given to AA riders who regularly spend $100,000 a year campaigning their large junior, small junior, eq. and jumper horses.

    Right -- Like these kids need $2500 so they can attend an emerging rider clinic.

    It is not the way I want my dues money spent and I vote that way in every survey I am sent.

    I would, however, support a true scholarship system for deserving young riders, such as Zazu Hoffman. In years past, top trainers would identify talent and take these kids under their wing and nuture it (As did Missy Clark with Zazou). Conrad Homfled was another such rider. He never owned a horse until he was in his 30's and owned 1/8th of Touch of Class.

    So, let's stop subsidizing the mega-rich and find a way to get the middle class involved.

    Otherwise, I don't think the OP wants me answering the poll.....
    "I used to have money, now I have horses."



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2003
    Location
    Hollywood, but not the one where they have the Oscars!
    Posts
    6,987

    Default

    I had to raise about 1k in order for a kid from my area to go. Thankfully there were enought generous folks that helped out and she was able to go. I think need based scholarships are a good idea.
    "You can't really debate with someone who has a prescient invisible friend"
    carolprudm



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2002
    Location
    Former Long Islander now in the middle of the Great Lakes
    Posts
    1,629

    Default

    This program like showing itself isn't interested in encouraging those who can't afford it.
    The mentality is , what good would it do to have an Olympic rider coach a kid on a POS horse who can't afford to show in Wellington or at least Ocala for the season. They aren't going anywhere in the sport so why waste time energy and effort.

    Sad part is, they are selling that kid riding the POS short. That's the kid who would work 26 hours a day to be a working student to a BNT. Worth a look yes .. gonna get a look, No it just isn't practical. Their isn't anything in it for the trainer other then possible grief from their BNC's

    $2,500.00 to a kid from nowhere is an entire show season on their local circuit. What good would it do to scrimp, save, beg, and borrow for 1 opportunity of a lifetinme that cannot possibly give them anything other then a great memory .



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 11, 2005
    Posts
    298

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Helpus View Post
    I could get behind this kind of idea. What I cannot support is scholarships given to AA riders who regularly spend $100,000 a year campaigning their large junior, small junior, eq. and jumper horses.

    Right -- Like these kids need $2500 so they can attend an emerging rider clinic.

    It is not the way I want my dues money spent and I vote that way in every survey I am sent.

    I would, however, support a true scholarship system for deserving young riders, such as Zazu Hoffman. In years past, top trainers would identify talent and take these kids under their wing and nuture it (As did Missy Clark with Zazou). Conrad Homfled was another such rider. He never owned a horse until he was in his 30's and owned 1/8th of Touch of Class.

    So, let's stop subsidizing the mega-rich and find a way to get the middle class involved.

    Otherwise, I don't think the OP wants me answering the poll.....
    Oh, AMEN!!!!! This is exactly what I am thinking.
    Friend of bar.ka



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2011
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    2,496

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Helpus View Post

    I would, however, support a true scholarship system for deserving young riders, such as Zazu Hoffman. In years past, top trainers would identify talent and take these kids under their wing and nuture it (As did Missy Clark with Zazou).
    I think the problem with this is the level a rider has to achieve before they would even come to the attention of a professional such as Missy Clark.

    Its a similar problem with the EAP...the lowest height section is 1.10m but to be competing at that height in the first place is expensive.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2002
    Location
    Former Long Islander now in the middle of the Great Lakes
    Posts
    1,629

    Default

    As many have observed, this program while based on good intentions, doesn't really achieve the objection of finding and developing emerging athletes. At least not those who will actually go on to being professional horseman and women. The only riders who have the money to compete at the elite levels in this country and who can afford to concentrate on being professional riders don't need such a program, they already ride with the best, on the best. . The riders who in their junior years who can afford to be competeing at the top levels are generally not going to go on to a pro riding career, they will become doctors, lawyers, or enter the financial markets. They have had the privilage of having the best educations money can buy .. and it is doubtful they will be wasting that education in the GP ring. But those are the riders (in general) who get to take advantage of this program.
    If this program were to reach it's objective it would have to be offered at no cost through host barns with donated horses and volunteer clinicians in at least 20 states over the course of a month.. It would then have to take on at least a half a dozen of these top emerging athletes as PAID working students with trainers who would allow them to actually show horses for them for a year or two. As it stands now this program isn't isn't reaching anyone liek that nor developing anything, it's just giving younger riders an opportunity to clinic with great pro riders. Unfortunately most of these young riders already have those opportunities. It is fast becoming a status symbol much like the show ring.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Posts
    2,607

    Default

    I'm not convinced that providing horses for kids who don't have a suitable horse or can't afford to ship one is necessary --

    Seems to me that the 'diamonds in the rough' types are known at least within their barns if not w/in their local associations -- They're going to need more than a free ride to EAP to become successful pros ... they'll need sponsors along the way -- If they haven't gotten a taste of that yet, let looking for a suitable loaner horse for EAP be their first experience attracting a sponsor -- It wouldn't hurt for EAP to provide applicants with some helpful hints for soliciting sponsors --
    "I never mind if an adult uses safety stirrups." GM



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2011
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    2,496

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dab View Post
    I'm not convinced that providing horses for kids who don't have a suitable horse or can't afford to ship one is necessary --

    Seems to me that the 'diamonds in the rough' types are known at least within their barns if not w/in their local associations -- They're going to need more than a free ride to EAP to become successful pros ... they'll need sponsors along the way -- If they haven't gotten a taste of that yet, let looking for a suitable loaner horse for EAP be their first experience attracting a sponsor -- It wouldn't hurt for EAP to provide applicants with some helpful hints for soliciting sponsors --
    I had a SUPER hard time finding a horse for the EAP, *and* I was paying! I cannot imagine having to do it for free. Nor can I imagine that barns are going to be willing to hand out a 4ft horse for a weekend of the show season.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2000
    Location
    Southern Pines, N.C.
    Posts
    11,421

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MIKES MCS View Post
    As many have observed, this program while based on good intentions, doesn't really achieve the objection of finding and developing emerging athletes. At least not those who will actually go on to being professional horseman and women. The only riders who have the money to compete at the elite levels in this country and who can afford to concentrate on being professional riders don't need such a program, they already ride with the best, on the best. . The riders who in their junior years who can afford to be competeing at the top levels are generally not going to go on to a pro riding career, they will become doctors, lawyers, or enter the financial markets. They have had the privilage of having the best educations money can buy .. and it is doubtful they will be wasting that education in the GP ring. But those are the riders (in general) who get to take advantage of this program.
    If this program were to reach it's objective it would have to be offered at no cost through host barns with donated horses and volunteer clinicians in at least 20 states over the course of a month.. It would then have to take on at least a half a dozen of these top emerging athletes as PAID working students with trainers who would allow them to actually show horses for them for a year or two. As it stands now this program isn't isn't reaching anyone liek that nor developing anything, it's just giving younger riders an opportunity to clinic with great pro riders. Unfortunately most of these young riders already have those opportunities. It is fast becoming a status symbol much like the show ring.
    This. Exactly.
    "I used to have money, now I have horses."



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2010
    Posts
    173

    Default

    As someone very excited about the EAP program, its vision by Melanie Smith Taylor, and the various clinicians, (all of which donate a significant amount of time free of charge or at a seriously reduced rates), I am sad to see some of the comments noted. I can understand that if you just see the commentary and articles about the Nationals one might think there is the belief that it is for those already privileged but that simply is not the case. I have participated as a parent/spectator/auditor for two years at two levels, one and two, and can say for certain that many riders whom have never seen an A show nor ever owned their own horses, have attended EAP and succeeded through the levels. These riders have outridden medal and maclay riders. My own kid did not own her own horse and we had to find a horse from local trainers and hope it worked when we got there. I will agree there were significant costs expended to travel to the location as we were 12 hours away in 2010 for level 1 and 17 from level 2 for our zone, in 2011, 17 hours from level 1. So yes, I wish that would be better.

    This year, at the zone I attended, there were event riders, pony club members, 4H members, and riders who have never seen a rated show. Of those that had seen an A show, they never owned their own horses. 6 or so kids rode borrowed or leased horses for the first time at EAP. Many kids were sponsored by their trainers. Many trainers even attended.

    Of course I would love to see the USHJA front the money for EAP but I doubt that will ever happen. It's simply not in their nature. But let's not discourage or talk down the clinicians who are donating their time. They are doing what they do for the kids. They don't control the ultimate decisions of the USHJA.

    I want to see more horsemanship in the program. And yes the program does allow riders to expand their horizons and venture to places as a working student. My kid was lucky enough to get a working student position because of EAP at a top show barn. She was given the opportunity to learn and work with some of the best horses in the country.



Similar Threads

  1. USHJA Emerging Athletes Program ?
    By Equsrider in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: Sep. 14, 2010, 01:44 PM
  2. Emerging Athletes Program Information
    By forestergirl99 in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Apr. 5, 2010, 08:06 PM
  3. USHJA Emerging Athletes Program
    By Sara Lieser in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Jan. 10, 2010, 11:02 AM
  4. Emerging Athletes Program - Level 2
    By Release First in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Aug. 3, 2009, 10:00 PM
  5. USHJA Emerging Athletes Program
    By Elevation15 in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 163
    Last Post: Jul. 8, 2009, 08:43 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness