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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2010
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    SE PA
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    278

    Default WWYD: Recently sold horse

    Ok....so I just sold a horse that my aunt and I have owned his entire life (due to financial and time restrictions). In the past 12 years this horse has NEVER had lameness issues. He might have had one abcess his entire life, and I remember him being sore for a few days after we tried a different farrier. I think the only time I ever gave this horse meds was when he coliced after a freak vet accident (too many shots at once). And we told all of this to his new owners.

    All spring/summer I've been riding this horse to keep him in shape to sell. He was jumping 2'-2'6 and has never displayed soreness, lameness, discomfort, etc. So one weekend we had a few PBs out to look at him, and most of them said he looked a bit "off". The one lady (apparently did her own farrier work) looked at his feet and claimed our farrier did a shotty job, and he had recently had his feet done. He was not dead lame, and was just tracking his one hind foot a bit off. I continued to ride him and he showed no obvious signs of discomfort or lameness. The one PB decided to get a PPE the following week. The vet used is very respected in our area, agreed that our farrier stinks, but thought it was coming more from his hocks. They did x-rays and found "normal" looking hocks for his age and history (jumping, etc). Vet recommended hock injections, and was convinced after poking, proding, and flexing that was the problem. PB decided to purchase the horse.

    I am friends with his new owner on facebook, and its been about a month. It sounds like this horse has been on stall rest since they've had him First they waited to get shoes on him, he apparently had a burst abbcess the other week, he is being unruly with the young girl, and now he is on two weeks of stall rest for a stifle injury?!?!? He is NOT that kind of horse that handles stall rest well. In fact he has NEVER been on stall rest before! Hes never had ANY issues before!

    I just don't understand it. I'm obviously afriad they think we lied about him and are not going to want him anymore. We do have first right of refusal, but a month has not changed our reasons for selling. I just don't understand how he can be perfectly fine for us all these years and then go somewhere else and have all these problems This horse means so much to us, and seeing all these status updates on facebook makes me want to throw up, cry, and take the trailer down there with cash in hand! Anyone have suggestions, similiar experiences, or jingles?
    Last edited by HGem; Aug. 5, 2011 at 08:39 AM. Reason: wow that was longer then i thought.....



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2009
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    South Central: Zone 7
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    1,925

    Default

    Our vet typically packs the hoof with a paste to draw out the abscess, wraps the foot and puts the horse on stall rest. After the abscess is drained, they begin work to harden it up. Again, they wrap the foot and keep the horse on stall rest. So, at least to us, stall rest is standard protocol for an abscess.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    6,857

    Default

    It is not at all unusual for horses to get more injuries when they move to a new place -- I think often they have to break in the new farm, per se, and the new owner's wallet.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
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    5,635

    Default

    Given the horse was off enough for multiple people to comment on it when they went out to look, it's not surprising they're having issues, hock injections or not.

    Often if a horse has one sore area, getting that fixed will change how they go enough to have another sore area. A stifle injury if he did something to his stifle is one thing - but stifle issues which are general issues are made better with work, not stall rest, and I cringe every time someone talks about how their horse has stifle problems so they put it on stall rest. Not going to help.

    And of course a horse who hasn't been on stall rest before is going to be a bit unruly. It happens.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2011
    Posts
    54

    Default

    I sold a gelding when I was in college who had never had any real hoof problems, though he pretty commonly stocked up in his hind legs after a lot of work. I found out that after this girl bought him he started abcessing regularly. She never held it against me, he had no history of abcessing with me, but I always sort of felt bad. He stayed sound for her the rest of the time, but I'm sure it was just something environmental, could have been her farrier, where he was kept, how muddy his turnout was, who knows.

    Keep in mind that your horse may just be adjusting to his new home and may be playing harder, thus injuring himsefl or appearing unruly. I wouldn't worry too much, since there isn't anything you did that caused these issues, I'm sure he'll settle in.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,057

    Default

    Suggestion? Stop reading her facebook. Or go buy him back. If she hasn't called you screaming that you sold her a lame horse, she obviously doesn't want to return him, unless you think for some reason she's afraid/embarrassed/worried about talking to you about acting on the first-refusal. He could just be adjusting to new barn, bedding, food, environment.

    His feet are no longer your problem, he's not your or your aunt's horse any more. If she isn't calling you begging you to take him back, new owner might not be as upset as you are! There's no point in worrying about it.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 19, 2002
    Location
    recent FL transplant from IL
    Posts
    7,173

    Default

    Were you friends with this person on FB before or only now because of the horse sale? Honestly, I would un-friend or block if you can that person so you don't see their status updates or any news about the horse that will upset you.

    The horse is no longer yours. You do not control the decisions they make or options they choose. If they want to change shoers, put the horse on stall rest, inject the horse or not, etc...--that is their choice as the owner. You represented the horse as was at the time of sale, they did a PPE & they opted to purchase him. Things can change quickly in a month, especially if the horse's program changes.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    14,521

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    Suggestion? Stop reading her facebook. Or go buy him back. If she hasn't called you screaming that you sold her a lame horse, she obviously doesn't want to return him, unless you think for some reason she's afraid/embarrassed/worried about talking to you about acting on the first-refusal. He could just be adjusting to new barn, bedding, food, environment.

    His feet are no longer your problem, he's not your or your aunt's horse any more. If she isn't calling you begging you to take him back, new owner might not be as upset as you are! There's no point in worrying about it.
    Yeah, quit reading about your "not your horse anymore" horse on FB. OP, I think you're being a glutton for punishment here. Owner hasn't called you to complain or accuse you of lying. You have right of first refusal and a way to keep in contact with the owner if you'd like that. You have the best of both worlds right now. Enjoy it.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
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    10,057

    Default

    Really, this is why I strongly believe once I sell, I don't want to know any more. Give yourself an ulcer, worrying like that.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
    Posts
    9,236

    Default

    Yep, stop reading about it. You can do that without "unfriend-ing" the buyer and causing possible issues that way (wow FB can be a touchy place!). Just "hide" the updates.

    Once the horse is gone, it's gone.
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2010
    Location
    SE PA
    Posts
    278

    Default

    Thanks guys! Yeah, I guess I need to block her news feeds. She does message me a couple times a week to give me updates. At first I thought it would be awesome to get updates on him. But I SURELY was not expecting updates like this!

    I'm glad to hear it is semi-normal for a horse to go through a rough adjustment more so then just a psycological one. I can't help but be sentemental, I literaly grew up with this horse. He was my best friend and I saw him almost every day for 12 whole years.

    Thanks for the tough love



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 1, 2008
    Posts
    4,674

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HGem View Post
    I am friends with his new owner on facebook, and its been about a month. It sounds like this horse has been on stall rest since they've had him First they waited to get shoes on him, he apparently had a burst abbcess the other week, he is being unruly with the young girl, and now he is on two weeks of stall rest for a stifle injury?!?!?
    Could be totally unrelated to any issues that the horse had before he left your property.

    One of the things I know about horses for sure is: If they can find a way to commit suicide, they will.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
    Location
    Horse Heaven
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    1,745

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fordtraktor View Post
    It is not at all unusual for horses to get more injuries when they move to a new place -- I think often they have to break in the new farm, per se, and the new owner's wallet.
    Boy, ain't that the truth. Same goes when buying cars and houses. New owners do things differently and sometimes stuff breaks, gets fixed, and after a bit, everyone adjusts.

    Cut the connection. It would give me an ulcer too. Of course, you care very much for this horse -- but you cant' move on until you let go.



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