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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2011
    Posts
    54

    Default What's your craziest horse buying story?

    I was relfecting today on how many silly/crazy/rude people and situations I've come across buying horses and shopping for horses for clients over the years. Another such one happened just the other day but I won't get into it right now. I am, however, reminded of the time my mother bought plane tickets to see a horse many states away, confirmed the flights, times, etc with the seller's barn/trainer, only to arrive and find that they had sold the horse several days prior and not bothered to tell her. But were very eager to show her some OTHER horses they had "since you're here..."

    Or the time a client and I looked at a horse and told the seller we were very interested but were going around the corner to eat lunch and discuss. Less than an hour later when we called back to arrange pick up and purchase, we were told the horse had sold in that hour. Which might have happened (though personally, I think he was sold before we ever got there), but she then said that the buyer couldn't come pick the horse up for three days and if we could get there with a trailer before then, we could buy him, he just had to be gone before the other lady showed up and we couldn't have any kind of trial (which had previously been agreed to)... No thanks!

    Or the 17hh mare that "hadn't been ridden in a few days" who was rearing and bucking the entire time I tried her, that the owner graciously offered to allow my (at the time) 8 year old barely 4 foot tall, beginner step daughter to get on and ride around. We declined...

    Now there have been hundreds of other instances where the sellers were totally honest and wonderful, but the "bad" experiences always stick in my head and remind me not to be surprised by people anymore. Anyway - I could use a good chuckle - wondering who else has had some crazy experiences... Let's hear them.


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  2. #2

    Default

    Had a nice mare up for sale for next to nothing. She was an abuse case and didnt trust anyone very easily so I was expecting to show her ALOT. I figured she would tell me when the right person came along.

    This guy shows up in his cowboy hat, boots and spurs ... complete with stock trailer. Takes one look at my mare and says "Ill give ye $500 for her." I told him that wasnt the asking price and he hadnt even touched her yet. BTW, the entire time he is there, she is HIDING behind me. He actually told me he wont need to ride her where she is going. I politely told him to exit my property.

    We did, however, find the perfect home for her. 14 year old girl who was abused and almost killed by her father. That mare put her head on the little girls shoulder and went to sleep. I knew that was it!
    Boomer's Hopes & Dreams
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    RIP Boomer - May 21, 1989 - November 3, 2010


    17 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2010
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    630

    Default

    I am in the process of looking for a nice quiet trail horse for my mom. We drove down to VA to look at a really cute palomino horse. He seemed nice in the video, worth a look. The GPS told me it would take me 2 hours to get to the town. I had told the lady we would be there between 1:30-2:00. I plugged the address from the website into my GPS and away we went.

    Well, the GPS couldn't find the road so sent us to some random place in VA, about an hour out of our way. As soon as we figured it out I called and left a message saying we got lost, we would be a little late and asking her to call us back for directions. We keep driving and finally get into the town. At this point I have called the lady 4 more times and left another voicemail. We find the police station and they look up the road and give us directions. Off we go again. It turns out the road is basically a gravel driveway with a street sign. We pull up to the barn, there are a good 30 horses in/around the barn, none are in the best of shape. Definitely a dealer. We walk around trying to find the lady, I called several more times, no where to be found. The horse is no where to be found. So we had to pack up and just leave. Really a very frustrating day! Never heard anything from the woman!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    495

    Default

    I drove four hours with trailer in tow for an OTTB that was dirt cheap and sounded like something that would be a fun project over the winter. Over the phone, owner said horse hadn't been ridden in about a month. No problem. Pull in to an old dairy farm, horse is in the field, soaking wet from standing in the rain and his legs are covered in mud. I ask for a rag to wipe off his legs. No problem. Ask for a hoof pick to pick out his muddy feet. Feet are long and owner admits they haven't been done in awhile. From what I can tell, not too horrendous. (Turns out later he had an abcess in two feet and a nasty crack in LH that took my farrier some clever engineering to get closed up.)

    I tack him up outside in the field in my saddle and bring my bridle with a snaffle over. In his sales pic he was going in an elevator with his mouth wiiide open, but I ask if they think he'll be fine in my bit. Owner says to try him first in her bit. No problem. While she goes to get it, her sister tells me horse hasn't been ridden in THREE months. Is that ok? Ehh...yeah, I guess. Horse seems very well mannered and I have a lot of experience with OTTBs. Grab vest just in case. Take horse out to soggy hay field outside of barn to ride. Horse is as good as he can be in said conditions. For $300, we load him up and take him home. Driving back, SO tells me Owner told him while they were standing there watching me ride that horse actually hadn't been ridden more than once or twice since the spring. It's now December. Why not just tell me that in the first place?!?!

    I got lucky with him. He turned into a really nice trail horse for SO and was great to bomb around on. And, true to his roots, you could leave him alone for weeks at a time and jump on without him batting an eye.
    http://poorwomanshowing.blogspot.com/
    R.I.P. Eagles Hill. 4/6/00-12/10/11.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 1, 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    477

    Default

    I work at a barn that has a couple OTTB' for sale right now, regularly exercised but also allowed to come down after racing, all under the age of 6yrs old.
    We have a couple of ads up just seeing who would be interested, and actually got quiet a few responses!

    so far 2 have gone to good loving homes, for free, as we don't sell them to make money, just to make sure they are loved and safe.
    There was one "looky loo" that the BO told me about, and pretty much it went like this:
    Young girl said she would show for 5pm, BO said great we will be here (they had another family looking at 3pm at another horse so timing worked out great), girl showed with 3 other friends (all under 18yrs old) in full dressage gear at 3.30pm........
    still not a huge issue, as the other family had just left to get the stall ready for Viva whom they were taking home.
    And the full gear was a bit odd, but still didn't make a difference in her eyes.

    BO says "Hi! Are you girls here to see Saddie?"
    Girl: Yes we are, and we came early so you wouldn't dope her" and her gaggle of hens back her up by nodding and making appropriate noises of approval.
    BO: Wow you really just said that didn't you? well lets get this over with...
    Girl: I heard thats what you race types do to sell horses fast, so I am just looking out for my best interest
    again followed by hens nodding and following in line towards the barn

    BO proceeds to show all horses, even the ones not for sale.

    She then ask where their saddles are so they can ride Saddie

    Girl: We didn't bring saddles, as we assumed you would provide equipment
    BO: all we have are western and exercise saddles, can you use those?
    Girl: Whats an exercise saddle? Is it like an english saddle?

    BO: Okay we are done here, Saddie is only going to an experienced OTTB owner, thank you for your time, good bye!

    Girls proceeded to storm off literally huffing and red in the face.

    Saddie is now in the loving arms of a 15yr old girl, who's parents both have OTTB's and is working out great!
    if you havent fallen off a horseā€¦.then you havent been ridin long enough


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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2008
    Location
    North Georgia
    Posts
    2,086

    Default

    Went and looked at a gelding several years ago that was described as seeming to be a good fit for me. When I arrived, he was awesome, and, from what I could tell, was a good fit.

    When I went to pick him up, however, the groom said to me, "his sedative should kick in soon." I played dumb (as if I was just a hauler) and asked, "his sedative? Why does he not like to haul?"

    "No, ma'am. He 'bout kicked a hole through the trailer last time and had a severe panic attack about it all, too. 'Bout killed Miss [Jane Doe] tryin' to get away from her."

    "Oh really? Yeah I think I remember hearing about that." (not)

    "You think that's bad, I hope whoever's gettin' this horse ain't plannin' on doin' a whole lot. He's about as dead lame as they come. He got that thing goin' on."

    "Navicular?"

    "Yeah - that's it."

    I marched up to the owner's house and informed her I would not be purchasing her sedated navicular horse. She looked at me with a sad face and said, "I guess you spoke to my Vet?" I said, "something like that."

    I tend to believe NOW that the groom KNEW who I was (as he had seen me there before when I came to look at the horse) and was just "casually" letting me know that the horse wasn't what I thought it was.

    ---------------------------------

    Then we have the "safe for everyone" horse I went and looked at for a friend and her young teenage daughter. The horse hadn't been ridden in FIVE years, but "when it WAS ridden, most anyone could ride him." The owner went to catch the horse, he played 'catch me if you can.' When he was caught, he was VERY ornery about saddling. When the owner got on him, he crow hopped, kicked up his back legs, threw the rider forward, then he threw his head back and about knocked the rider off his back.

    ----------------------------

    Quote Originally Posted by BoomerButt View Post

    This guy shows up in his cowboy hat, boots and spurs ... complete with stock trailer. Takes one look at my mare and says "Ill give ye $500 for her." I told him that wasnt the asking price and he hadnt even touched her yet. BTW, the entire time he is there, she is HIDING behind me. He actually told me he wont need to ride her where she is going. I politely told him to exit my property.
    Well heck I think you live in Georgia because that sounds JUST like a guy that came to look at a friend's horse. I was closer to the barn and was showing this guy the horse. He shows up - stock trailer in tow. He gets out with boots, the whole 9 yards. When the time comes for him to "try him out" he looks at me dumbfounded and asks ME to saddle the horse up because "his wife always does it for him." Right then and there, I asked him to sign a liability release for the barn. I had to give him a leg up to mount the horse, and he had no idea what he was doing.

    Already knowing this was not going to work, he dismounts and offers $400 for the horse (listed at a STEAL for $1500.) I said, "sorry - that's not the asking price." He gets annoyed, has me untack the horse, and that was that. When he left, the male barn owner tells me he acts an awful lot like a kill buyer or dealer.
    If wishes were horses then beggars would ride...
    DLA: Draft Lovers Anonymous
    Quote Originally Posted by talkofthetown View Post
    As in, the majikal butterfly-fahting gypsy vanners.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    8,065

    Default

    Once I went to look at some horses with a friend and the farmer had a 3 year old, cute Paint for sale for a couple hundred bucks. We decide to try it, so I saddled it up, hopped on and walked, trotted and cantered it around a field full of rusty implements. Horse did fine, typical baby green steering but a good fellow.

    The farmer then told me he was impressed as no one had ever been on its back before. Well, sir, you might have told me it wasn't broke to ride BEFORE I got on. I am a bit more specific in asking questions when horse-shopping now.

    We did buy the horse.


    19 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2001
    Location
    Coatesville, Pa.
    Posts
    5,559

    Wink

    Back in the 80's when mom and I were still green and wet behind the ears, we went a few hours in the car to go look at a mare that my coach had reccomended we see. It was before GPS and we ended up at the farm an hour early.

    The mare was being lunged, in tight side reins and was covered in a lather. We asked about this. "Oh well we've been on vacation for a week, so she wasn't worked..."

    I rode her, loved her and I am sad to report, we bought her. (We didn't know any better)

    But I will say... for what she lacked in dressage, she made up for as a serious jumper. She never met a xc fence she didn't like. And she was fast. Thankfully we both survived and she taught me many things about life and eventing.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Then we have the ex-steeplechaser I tried.... at 12 yrs old... at a dead gallop over hurdle fences. And then they showed us the 6 screws in his ankle on the xray.... Yea we got out of there pretty fast. Although I will say the horse was kind considering what I know about racehorses now.

    ~Emily
    "Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgment that something is more important than fear. The brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all." ~2001 The Princess Diaries



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2009
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, CND
    Posts
    2,191

    Default

    When I went to go purchase my IBWB mare (huge andy hair!!) I got the funniest story and felt so so bad for the woman selling her. They were getting ready to move so it was a sell or pay the haul situation, and I was REALLY interested (came down with cheque in hand).

    There had been a BIG storm the night before and a tree had come down on the electric, and which point the entire family (mom, 3 sibs of my mare) decided to go for a wander... right into a HUGE patch of burrs.

    The seller told me later they had 3 people SCRAMBLING with combs & CBM to get all the burrs out of her before I showed up, and had finally resorted to cutting a chunk out of her tail (a small one) as I came down the drive-way. To put it in perspective: her year old brother's mane was standing UP because of all the burrs, and I think they ended up roaching.

    I felt so bad, and explained they could have just told me what had happened, I wasn't there to buy her hair, I was there to buy the horse under it. Although I was impressed the lengths they went to show her off the best they good, she was unbroken and they even tacked up her full brother who was in a "lesson" before we could use the arena to show off their potential.

    Meg was an sob that day too, balking at cavaleties and being a moron, but it was love at first 'zomg she just jumped 3' from a stand still with perfect form while spooking at the jump'.
    "For some people it's not enough to just be a horse's bum, you have to be sea biscuit's bum" -anon.
    Nes' Farm Blog ~ DesigNes.ca
    Need You Now Equine



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2011
    Location
    Madison, GA
    Posts
    3,335

    Default

    Oooh oooh!! I have one! It's actually when we sold a horse to the COTHer HoneyB! I thought she was nuts!

    So in GA it almost never snows, and if it does, you stay inside until it's over. Well HoneyB and her trainer had an appointment to come look at some horses our ours and decided to still come out because at that point it either hadn't started snowing or it was barely snowing... Anyway, by the time they got to to the farm, full blizzard conditions had set in. I'm talking snow and WIND! I was freezing my Southern butt off! So she looks at this GORGEOUS breeding stock paint mare of ours who has the shortest, sleekest, most gorgeous summer coat year round. I rode that mare in the blizzard for awhile for them. We joked because if a horse is ever going to be bad it going to be during a blizzard with all the cold air and wind!

    HoneyB loved her and bought her

    BUT here's the kicker! Somehow we started talking about the fact that we have a monsterous 17.2 Percheron trail horse. They decide they want to see her too... in the blizzard... in the arena... ENGLISH! LOL, this horse hadn't been in the arena in years and had never been ridden english. Luckily I have an extra wide close contact saddle for my fat paint, so it fit her just fine. The only bridle we could find to fit he was her western bridle though. So now we have pics of me riding her in a blizzard and english. It's so funny and that mare wanted nothing to do with any of it! We have another pic of me mounting her with a ladder that's pretty funny too.
    Southern Cross Guest Ranch
    An All Inclusive Guest Ranch Vacation - Georgia



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 28, 2003
    Posts
    4,521

    Default

    We had a very specific set of 'wants' for our last purchase. There weren't many of them out there (we knew that would be an issue, but knew what we wanted and were willing to look/pay for it).

    A friend suggested we might find what we want in Canada and that we should work with a broker up there who could show us around. OK. Discussed what we wanted, planned the trip. Confirmed a few days before the trip that there were horses to see etc. They sent a picture and description which we said OK to look at
    So we drive up - 11 hours. Call on arrival and get together for dinner to find
    a) the pictured horse is pretty much all they found for us to look at, but that they'd check the papers today and make some calls.
    b) By the way... they were committed to doing something else the next day (on Day 1 of our 2 day trip) so we could go to this show (about 1.5 more hours away) where some suitable type horses might be showing
    c) Turned out the guy we were supposed to see show at the competition was the breeder of the horse we were going to see the next day and that horse was 2.5 hours away in a different direction. Hadn't occurred to anyone to bring the horse to the show

    So we traveled 11.5 hours to hang out for a day for the broker to be available to take us another 2.5 hours to see a horse that turned out to not meet our criteria and then look at large groups of young/untrained horses in fields and then stopped at a dealer to see another horse they had found who was withdrawn because it cribbed


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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2008
    Location
    North Georgia
    Posts
    2,086

    Default

    I just remembered another one (sad story.)

    I had seen a cute grey Arabian for sale on some horse selling website. It was about an hour from where I lived so I drove over to check him out.

    The gelding's ad read something like this: "bought for my wife six months ago as a confidence builder. She's ready for something with a little more pep. Quiet, well broke Arab. $500."

    I pull up to the house, and immediately I'm thinking, "what have I gotten myself into?" Needless to say, "Deliverance" had nothing on this place.

    A shirtless guy comes walking out with a beer in one hand and asks, "you here for the horse?" I said, "yes, I am," and he escorts me around the house to the backyard. First of all, I see eight horses in 1/4 acre mud lot - all of them are underweight, and the fencing is a combo of old/loose barbed wire, PVC piping, and chainlink.

    The Arab, on the other hand, was tied to an upper tree branch with a chain dog leash. I immediately noticed the horse had two sweat stains (dried) on his back showing me that he had been ridden at least twice today and probably left there tied up all day long.

    The super sweet doe-eyed gelding reached his head down and nuzzled my hand as if to say, "save me."

    The redneck gave me this cockamamie story about how he used to be a show jumper, and although he injured himself, he was sound for riding. He asked if I wanted him to ride him (a 14 hh Arab and a 350+ lbs man? No.) I walked him around, and I noticed him dragging his rear leg. I reached around to figure out what was going on and noticed a HUGE hard lump on the inside of his rear leg. The guy said, "yeah - that's his jumping injury."

    Because I felt awful for this horse, I handed over $600 cash ($500 for horse, $100 for delivery,) wrote up a sales agreement and left.

    A few days later, the guy comes and brings the horse. His wife comes along as well. As they pull up to the large pasture, his wife turns up his nose and says, "I GUESS this place will do for him."

    As he unloads the horse and hands me the coggins, I just check to make sure it's current, and send them on their way. After I look at the coggins, I realize that it was pulled from an auction up in Tennessee, and he had gotten the horse a week prior to listing him online. So much for "confidence builder for my wife."

    I had a Vet come out to assess the horse, and he told me, "no way is this horse going to be sound for anything other than leading a kid or two around."

    That's exactly the type of home I found for him: a family with two small girls that just wanted a horse to groom and love on. He's still with them to this day (he's 28 years old now.) The little girls named him "Pegasus."

    When I got on another horse forum, there was a woman talking about this same horse. Turns out, the horse dealer told her that the horse was a rodeo pick up horse that got hit by a bull, but he was sound. He said this, she said, while proceeding to canter the horse around in a tight circle, the horse tripping and stumbling. He stopped when the woman's twelve year old screamed, "STOP! STOP! He's going to fall!" I guess that was one of the two sweat stains I saw.
    If wishes were horses then beggars would ride...
    DLA: Draft Lovers Anonymous
    Quote Originally Posted by talkofthetown View Post
    As in, the majikal butterfly-fahting gypsy vanners.


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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2011
    Location
    Madison, GA
    Posts
    3,335

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HydroPHILE View Post
    When I got on another horse forum, there was a woman talking about this same horse. Turns out, the horse dealer told her that the horse was a rodeo pick up horse that got hit by a bull, but he was sound. He said this, she said, while proceeding to canter the horse around in a tight circle, the horse tripping and stumbling. He stopped when the woman's twelve year old screamed, "STOP! STOP! He's going to fall!" I guess that was one of the two sweat stains I saw.
    We bought a gorgeous chocolate palomino quarter horse mare that was VERY lame as a broodmare. The vet said she must have had an accident years ago because of all the scar tissue, but there was no reason not to breed her. Well we eventually got tired of dealing with her because you couldn't catch her, tie her, give her shots, and we had bred her but she had twins and we pinched one off and the other one got absorbed. We sold "Money Pit" full disclosure to someone as a broodmare (once again drop dead gorgeous mare). A few weeks go by and we get this call from a lady saying she had bought Money Pit as a riding horse at a sale. We have no idea how she even ended up at a sale because the guy we sold her to was not a dealer. She said that they guy she bought her from said she was a cow horse and the rub on her back leg was from roping a cow. We felt so bad for her. First of all the "rub" wasn't from a rope at all - we had kept her in a dry lot because it was the only thing small enough on our farm where we could still catch her. It had been a really rainy and the dry lot turned into a mud lot and the "rub" was actually just fungus from the mud. We also explained to her that the vet said she would never be sound for riding and to our knowledge the mare had never seen a cow... Poor lady, but poor horse too.
    Southern Cross Guest Ranch
    An All Inclusive Guest Ranch Vacation - Georgia



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2006
    Location
    Sno County
    Posts
    3,935

    Default

    We had a potential buyer for an appy we were selling show up at 11:30 PM wanting to see the horse. We were in bed when the doorbell rings and TADA, there she is. She had called all day postponing her appointment which was originally for 2:00 that afternoon. We didn't hear from her after 6:00 so thought she had gone home and wasn't coming. I couldn't believe my eyes when she is there with her 6 year old son in tow and her little rat dog at close to midnight. What goes through the minds of some people is beyond me. And, she asks if there's anyplace she could cash a money order because she had no cash on her at all and no gas to get home with. Good lord, what a piece of work. We turned her away and told her horse was not for sale to her.
    Yogurt - If you're so cultured, how come I never see you at the opera? Steven Colbert



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2005
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    6,698

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    Oh, well, there was the day, summer 1970, when I was theoretically packing trunks and etc in preparation for leaving the following day for a year in France. It is true that I was gone from the house for several hours, and my Mom presumed I was out doing some last minute shopping for essentials for the trip. Where I was, was setting up the purchase of a $700 3 yo quarter horse who'd already had success as a western pleasure horse (but was a bit of a rogue, as a 2 yo had put his trainer in the hospital). Dear old Dad was such a soft touch on that one.

    The transaction occurred after I went to France - the horse was shown in one more futurity where he won $1k if memory serves, and he was delivered to our barn, where my younger sister rode and showed him in Jr. AQHA shows til I returned the following summer. After his WP career I foxhunted him for 20 years.

    I did get all the packing done before I got on the plane. But my Mother is still apoplectic on the subject 41 years later.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2005
    Posts
    201

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OveroHunter View Post
    Oooh oooh!! I have one! It's actually when we sold a horse to the COTHer HoneyB! I thought she was nuts!

    So in GA it almost never snows, and if it does, you stay inside until it's over. Well HoneyB and her trainer had an appointment to come look at some horses our ours and decided to still come out because at that point it either hadn't started snowing or it was barely snowing... Anyway, by the time they got to to the farm, full blizzard conditions had set in. I'm talking snow and WIND! I was freezing my Southern butt off! So she looks at this GORGEOUS breeding stock paint mare of ours who has the shortest, sleekest, most gorgeous summer coat year round. I rode that mare in the blizzard for awhile for them. We joked because if a horse is ever going to be bad it going to be during a blizzard with all the cold air and wind!

    HoneyB loved her and bought her

    BUT here's the kicker! Somehow we started talking about the fact that we have a monsterous 17.2 Percheron trail horse. They decide they want to see her too... in the blizzard... in the arena... ENGLISH! LOL, this horse hadn't been in the arena in years and had never been ridden english. Luckily I have an extra wide close contact saddle for my fat paint, so it fit her just fine. The only bridle we could find to fit he was her western bridle though. So now we have pics of me riding her in a blizzard and english. It's so funny and that mare wanted nothing to do with any of it! We have another pic of me mounting her with a ladder that's pretty funny too.
    Yeah, that is my craziest horse shopping story as well, despite the fact that the one where I bought my TB was pretty nuts too. But it all worked out. I LOVE that mare. I figured she was either 100% sane or totally drugged to be so good under those conditions! Random PSA: I will vouch that Southern Cross does NOT dope their horses.

    Although, in our defense, I do have to say that I'm from PA, my trainer is from NJ, and her hubby (the one wanted to see the Perchie) is from England. And all 3 of us event/fox hunt so... (a) it wasn't THAT cold/snowy, and (b) it wasn't too out of character for us.
    Georgia and Mighty Thoroughbred Cliques



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2011
    Posts
    54

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    These are great! Some of them really made me laugh, of course, it is sad how some people "do business"...



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2011
    Location
    Sweet Old Carolina
    Posts
    24

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    This one happened about 8 years ago. My trainer brought in about 5 different horses for another one of her students to try out. I was getting to the point that I was too tall for my 13.2hd pony and there was this gorgeous OTTB mare that was just as calm as could be. I tried her out and fell in love with her. Before we made our final decision the HUGE snow storm hit. Since she was already on the property we ended up keeping her a few extra weeks than we had originally planned for the trial. I didn't get a chance to ride her or anything during this time period because it had snowed like 2 feet and in the Carolina's that is unheard of. Well once the snow started melting and we pulled everybody's blankets off we found a big shocker. Her belly had grown tremendously in just a short time period. We had her checked by the vet and sure enough she was pregnant. Once the lady who was trying to sell her to us found out, she tried to get her back. Basically she had gotten her from a broodmare farm because they thought she couldn't "catch". Oh how they were wrong. Luckily my trainer agreed to pay for all the baby bills in exchange for keeping the baby. I wouldn't have been able to get the if she hadn't because I was 14 and my mom wasn't up for taking on a baby. Strangely after she had her foal her entire personality changed. She was still as sweet as she ever was, but she turned a little bit crazy. If she was scared or didn't understand she would RUN! Over the years that I rode her, I learned a lot. She taught me how to handle a complicated hot horse that has helped me through my entire riding career.
    A pony is a childhood dream, a horse is an adulthood treasure
    http://turningdreamsintotreasure.blogspot.com/

    http://www.facebook.com/ThaliaFarm



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    45,875

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    Some years ago, I was looking for a specific horse of certain bloodlines and characteristics and found one several hours away.
    I knew a trainer close that told me he had seen the owner competing with that horse for a couple of years and seemed like a nice horse.
    The owner was a loan officer at a bank, not someone you would think was in a position to be less than honest.
    One requirement was that the horse be very short and this one I was assured was 14.1 hands and looked short in the pictures, the fellow riding him had his feet below the horse's belly.
    I had a PPE done on the horse and the vet measured him at 14.1 hands.
    The owner told me he was selling him because he was too short for him and in the pictures it sure looked like it was.

    A friend told me of someone that was going down there that weekend to see his girlfriend and could just haul him back for me.
    I agreed and that Sunday afternoon, here comes this little car pulling a rustbucket two horse trailer with this big horse practically hanging off the back.

    We unload the horse and he is not that big, but we measure him at 15.1 hands and a bit.

    Then the fellow that hauled him here tells me "he loves that horse, he would want to buy him from me and go on to compete further with him".

    I have never bought and sold a horse so quickly, I am still debating and I don't think he should be put in that trailer and see if it stays together another hour down the highways.

    So we make a deal and I haul the horse to his place the next weekend, when he again has some time off, he is a welder in the oil fields and roper on the weekends.

    Now, that is a fellow that is well recommended to haul the horse and as a good rider.
    We get there with the horse and he then tells me he has to pay the horse on terms and can only pay a bit down now.
    Ok, we write a contract and I stipulate the horse stay at the boarding stables until paid, not his house.

    A month passes and excuses again about moving and not having money, at two months I go get the horse back and later sold him.

    I still think about all that as a very crazy time, kept getting in trouble, knowing I was getting in trouble, no one was doing what they say they were doing and things kept getting worse.

    You really can't trust many people any more, you have to go see the horse and try it if you can, because people will tell you what they think you want to hear.

    14.1 hands? Someone can't tell a 4 from a 5.
    The owner in the pictures was 6'6".



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2009
    Posts
    577

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    One time when I was out-to-here pregnant, my best bud begged me to go with her to look at a "Fabulous 16+ hand mare - only a hour away" She was a tall girl, needed a large horse. Reluctantly I dragged myself off the couch and went with her to see this horse of a life time deal. Well, of course the trip took over two hours, we got lost, whatever, finally arrive at this dumpy place smack in the middle of some huge weed infested pasture. There were about 20 horses ranging around, not a single one of them over 15 hands, if that. All were either obviously lame, or had horrible scars on their legs, bad feet, wormy pot bellies, never had seen a grooming, half were babies or unbroke.

    I was feeling pretty cranky anyway, after all that and asked the man how in the heck he figured this mare was "16+ hands"??? His wife said they got this 13 year old a year ago, and fattened her up and put shoes on her fronts, so they figured she grew over four inches in that time..... we left.

    -----------------------------------------------------------
    Then there was the horse I purchased who'd been all over the place the sellers said. Trail rides, been camping, traveled all across the nation. I bought him. Well, he did load well into any type trailer. What the sellers failed to tell me was he didn't RIDE well in trailers. I'm always alone when I venture out for rides, hunts, etc. So this horse was horrible. Pawed and pounded his feet every time we stopped at lights, were stuck in traffic. He had big, heavy hooves, and I had a brand new trailer. He struck the escape doors and dented those all up on his side. The worst part was, he was terrifed of RAIN. If he heard the pitter patter of rain on the roof, either in the trailer or in the barn, he went bonkers, just plain nutso. In general anything spooked this nut case around the farm, violently, if he was at all startled. I put up with that for about a year and gave him to a friend needing a pasture companion for another horse. Who needs that heart stopping hassle???

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Had a horrible escape artist gelding. Nothing he wouldn't try to get out of a stall or pasture. The first time in the stall he lifted, with his teeth, the solid oak door, right off its hinges. The latch held, so he just leaped over the low part hanging. Got into the tractor shed. It mattered not how much hay or shade or companions he had, how hard he was worked that day, how clever I was nailing everything down, he saw it all as a challenge to beat. Then he would go up next to the fence and lay down to roll. Would roll all the way over, of course getting his legs underneath the bottom rail of the board fence. Always got cut up getting up. No matter how large his area, he always rolled over onto the fence. And he'd put pressure on the top boards, manage to get them off and down. Would try to step over the middle board, breaking it. I ended up hot wiring the entire pasture, and the paddocks. But not the barn! What a head ache he was!!!!!!! ARUGH!


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