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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2010
    Location
    Deep in the Heart of Texas aka Houston
    Posts
    377

    Default Horse struggling in the humidity

    Recently moved to Houston which is just as hot as where we were living but not as humid. Mare is not adjusting well still after being here for a month. After a short 30 min ride of just easy walk and trot, she is panting at a 120 breaths per minute. She was never like this before where we used to live. I could ride her for 2 hours. She gets hosed off after being ridden and parked infrint of an industrial fan until her breathing is more normal. Also started the supplement one ac but probably too soon to notice a difference. Anyone with any tips/help?
    Quote Originally Posted by Sithly View Post
    do NOT give your 5 year old child a big bag of apples and send her out alone into a herd of 20-some horses to get mobbed. There are better ways to dispose of unwanted children.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2002
    Location
    Arlington, VA US
    Posts
    1,352

    Default

    try hosing off before you ride and ride her while she is wet coated
    Appy Trails,
    Kathy & Cadet
    member CDCTA www.cdcta.com, TROT www.trot-md.org & Free State Appaloosa Horse Club freestateaphc.org



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2008
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    375

    Default

    Humidity increases the heat index, so it probably feels hotter than where you lived previously.

    Do you give your horse electrolytes? I find those really help my mare in the summer.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2010
    Location
    Deep in the Heart of Texas aka Houston
    Posts
    377

    Default

    Yes sorry she is on electrolytes.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sithly View Post
    do NOT give your 5 year old child a big bag of apples and send her out alone into a herd of 20-some horses to get mobbed. There are better ways to dispose of unwanted children.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 30, 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    191

    Default

    I have a gelding that spent the last 5 years in Seattle, then came here to the Houston area for our really severe hot, early, and dry summer. He is not a good drinker. I believe hydration helps them. I soak his hay, give him very weak gatorade (3/4 scoop in a big bucket of water, he thinks it is a treat). On really hot days I pull him inside during the heat of the day, hose him, and put him under a fan for a while. Good luck!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2000
    Location
    Proud owner of one Lunar acre! (Campanus Crater, The Moon)
    Posts
    14,071

    Default

    Any time you move to some place new that is hotter (hotter feeling due to humidity which increases the heat index) it takes about a year for horses and humans to completely adjust to the change. Some (usually warmbloods) take longer to adapt. I'm just saying that you might want to see what happens over time. Take it easy for now, it will get cooler. Then when it gets warmer next summer, she might be better equipped to handle it.

    It's not an overnight thing. I LOVE warm weather, but every time I've moved from some place cooler to some place warmer, it takes me a long time to adapt. If it's more humid, it takes me even longer. Same for my horses, based on my experiences.

    Actually, moving some place truly cold can be easier for some horses, unless you do it in the dead of winter. Then it's brutal to both man and beast! Sometimes seems worse to me. You just cannot get warm. Cooling off usually takes hosing off and maybe applying some ice--and not doing too much until you adapt.

    You could do a cool off FIRST, then ride and then cool off again. The eventers would have even better suggestions than us dressage riders on how to cool them down well and safely. I do know that there are a lot of new developments that they are testing out at events and could possibly help you get her started. (Hopefully not too expensive!)
    "Relinquish your whip!!"



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2000
    Location
    Proud owner of one Lunar acre! (Campanus Crater, The Moon)
    Posts
    14,071

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kch7238 View Post
    On really hot days I pull him inside during the heat of the day, hose him, and put him under a fan for a while. Good luck!
    Yep. Night turn out is the best in hot places. Inside with fans and sometimes even misters (when you have them) is best during the day in the hotter climates.
    "Relinquish your whip!!"



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    2,190

    Default

    Can you change the time you ride? I used to be in Missouri ( moved last Sept) where humidity abounds! I always did my best to ride early mornings. My horses would stay in their barn ( their choice) during most of the day and go out in the evening. I know some people don't have a flexible schedule as to when they can ride, but your horse would do much better, in my experience.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2011
    Posts
    558

    Default

    Be forewarned... Houston's experiencing severe drought. It's not normally this "pleasant" outside. It's usually significantly more humid.

    Tips for Houston riding:
    Ride either before 10am or after 6pm.
    Invest in fans. Lots of 'em.
    Find shade for "real" work
    Longer/more frequent walk breaks
    Rinse before riding
    Rinse after riding
    Always scrape off excess water
    Turn out at night
    Water everything you can (feed, hay, etc)
    Wait til October/November when the temps dip below 90.

    If you want to cool her off quicker, sponge her down after her rides with water + rubbing alcohol. If you REALLY want to cool her off, ice + rubbing alcohol. Some people leave a water+alcohol bucket by the arena to cool the horses during walk breaks.

    Enjoy Houston.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 1999
    Location
    Rosehill, TX
    Posts
    7,033

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cnm161 View Post
    Be forewarned... Houston's experiencing severe drought. It's not normally this "pleasant" outside. It's usually significantly more humid.

    Tips for Houston riding:
    Ride either before 10am or after 6pm.
    Invest in fans. Lots of 'em.
    Find shade for "real" work
    Longer/more frequent walk breaks
    Rinse before riding
    Rinse after riding
    Always scrape off excess water
    Turn out at night
    Water everything you can (feed, hay, etc)
    Wait til October/November when the temps dip below 90.

    If you want to cool her off quicker, sponge her down after her rides with water + rubbing alcohol. If you REALLY want to cool her off, ice + rubbing alcohol. Some people leave a water+alcohol bucket by the arena to cool the horses during walk breaks.

    Enjoy Houston.

    good advice

    I would add - ride while she feels herself and take a rinse-off break before she gets stressed - so if she was stressed at 20, rinsebreak at 15 then ride another 15 - repeat
    Nothing says "I love you" like a tractor. (Clydejumper)

    The reports states, “Elizabeth reported that she accidently put down this pony, ........, at the show.”



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    32,149

    Default

    I was only going to add that this stinkin high humidity here in bamaland is making me huff and puff with no exercise...can't blame any critter for doing it in work....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2005
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    4,598

    Default

    Meeeee toooo alagirl. As in - not riding unless it's before 8AM. Too hot for man and beast down here!
    SPAY/NEUTER/RESCUE/ADOPT!
    Little Star Chihuahua Rescue
    The Barkalicious Bakery
    On Facebook!!!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2008
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    375

    Default Any allergies?

    I am not sure about Houston, but in Austin the allergens are always high. Although you would think nothing is growing with the drought ....
    But allergens can definitely affect breathing as well.

    I personally take it very easy with my horse - trail riding or walk trot for 30 minutes - except for when I ride at 7 am on weekends.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2010
    Posts
    1,433

    Default

    I easily mix 50 quarts of weak gatorade for my horses everyday. Big help.

    They are rinsed before coming into the barn and standing under fans mid day.

    I have a garden mixer thing for wintergreen alcohol, listerine and apple cider vinegar to be mixed at least once a week if not more.

    Gotta love the south and the humidity.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2003
    Posts
    614

    Default

    Honestly, if it is your first summer here, I would take it easy until September when it cools off. You do not want to stress your horses system and have her stop sweating. I usually scale back in August because I feel like the heat starts to get to the horses, especially this summer being so hot. I just try to keep them from losing fitness but I don"t train on them as much. As another poster suggested, I would try night turnout and put up a fan.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,652

    Default JINGLES FOR YOUR MARE AND YOU ``

    JINGLES FOR YOUR MARE DURING THIS EXTREME SUMMER OF
    HEAT & HUMIDITY ~
    Last edited by Zu Zu; Jul. 26, 2011 at 08:12 PM.
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 20, 2007
    Posts
    214

    Default

    Please be sure to scrape the water off when you rinse!! In humidity the water on the hair/skin can not evaporate and it just sits and gets warm and makes it even hotter for the horse to cool off. Because of this, I would not recommend rinsing before I rode unless you had time to let her almost completely dry. After you ride, cold or ice water and continue to scrape. You will know when you may stop when your horse's coat is not hot to the touch. Definitely keep in during the day under high velocity fan and turn out at night. Keeping their coat clean also helps them to stay cooler, so on days your don't ride, be sure to groom her and get the sticky dirt off so that the skin can breathe!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2006
    Posts
    102

    Default

    It is simple - Move back to NC :-)

    OK, in all seriousness - lots of walk breaks, ride early in the am or late in the pm, hose her chest off before you ride, and it doesn't hurt to have a bucket of cold water in the arena while you are riding. Have some clothes in it and put a fresh one over her withers throughout your ride. Some rubbing alcohol works too - what cools down you and a horse is the evaporation process. Alcohol (rubbing that is ;-) evaporates quickly.

    Sorry they are having such a tough time. Banner had a hard to time when her first moved from Canada to NC, but he did acclimate.....



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 15, 2007
    Location
    (throw dart at map) NC!
    Posts
    4,839

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Liz View Post
    Honestly, if it is your first summer here, I would take it easy until September when it cools off. You do not want to stress your horses system and have her stop sweating. I usually scale back in August because I feel like the heat starts to get to the horses, especially this summer being so hot. I just try to keep them from losing fitness but I don"t train on them as much. As another poster suggested, I would try night turnout and put up a fan.
    This, and cnm's suggestions. It'll take your horse time to acclimate. I hope you have access to a covered arena....



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2002
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    5,375

    Default

    Good thread. I didn't know about hosing down until cool to the touch ... my very thin-skinned mare is adjusting pretty well to the move from hot (but dry) northern California to central Florida, but we do a LOT of walk warmup.
    *=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=



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