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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2008
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    Carrollton, Ga
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    Default $140,000 Horse found dead after flight

    This is so sad. I wonder what happened.

    http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/m...8KKPfwsuZ12XIP



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
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    6,634

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spotnnotfarm View Post
    This is so sad. I wonder what happened.

    http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/m...8KKPfwsuZ12XIP

    It is sad, but it must have been something congenital. Another possibility is some sort of bad reaction to a sedative.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2002
    Posts
    1,012

    Default

    Not only sad but wierd it was "found dead". Don't grooms travel with horses on flights? I would think that is a requirement .If a horse gets out of control on a flight it could bring the plane down.I would imagine if it got to kicking at the beginning of the flight ,it was given something,and that may have gone very wrong.I am sure someone knows what happened.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 24, 2006
    Posts
    519

    Default

    I also think it's weird that it was 'found dead'. There must be more to the story. I have flown with horses before and there is always someone going back and forth to check on them, try to give them water, check hay, etc. It's not often the horses get tranquilized, as far as I know, either.
    And if a horse is freaking out/considered dangerous, they don't bring the plane down, the horse has to be put down. And from what I hear, not in a very nice way, either.
    Rather intrigued about this story now...
    **********************************
    I'd rather be riding!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2007
    Location
    ....in a classroom in Fl, by the ocean
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    3,765

    Default

    MooCow, I agree with you completely, and as you know, during take off and landing a groom is NOT allowed to check on the horses, its too dangerous to walk around. I have flown with Air Al El 4 times and they mean business if something goes wrong. if you know what I mean. They (the pilots) did not speak English and I did not speak their language but they showed me where the gun was just in case I needed. Thank god I never did.


    Found dead would imply that the groom on the flight was not doing their job, there was no groom (highly unlikely), pony had a heart attack or something unpreventable during flight, and it would have been found dead as there is no way to contact the ground crew receiving the horses during the flight.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2011
    Location
    Maryland
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    2,124

    Default

    how often is a ONE year old pony/warmblood? worth $140K??
    Barn rat for life

    The Big Horse



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2009
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, CND
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    2,191

    Default

    "found dead" could also mean the groom was not in front of the horse when it died. As in, was checking on other horses/going the bathroom/etc. and came back to a dead horse.

    Sounds like it could have colicked or something.
    "For some people it's not enough to just be a horse's bum, you have to be sea biscuit's bum" -anon.
    Nes' Farm Blog ~ DesigNes.ca
    Need You Now Equine



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 2, 2000
    Location
    Sussex, NJ
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wcporter View Post
    how often is a ONE year old pony/warmblood? worth $140K??
    I was thinking some one just got confused with a yearling and a pony. You know how people think a pony will grow up to be a horse.
    My husband picks up horses from JFK all the time and I'll have to check with him because I know there is on airline that he has to deal with sometimes that is really screwy. Not an airline I would ever recommend.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2001
    Location
    West of insanity, east of apathy, deep in the heart of Texas.
    Posts
    15,797

    Cool

    I find it very suspicious that the pony was "found dead". If that were indeed the case, the groom didn't do his/her job. As others have said, there's a lot more to this story. Poor pony.
    In loving memory of Laura Jahnke.
    A life lived by example, done too soon.
    www.caringbridge.org/page/laurajahnke/



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 2, 2000
    Location
    Sussex, NJ
    Posts
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    Default

    That is the airline. My husband said attendants are not always horse people. Also the article does say that the pony/horse/yearling started kicking 30 minutes after take off, calmed down and then was found dead "a short time later". So that makes it sound like it was found during the flight. Shipping a yearling is not easy unless they are used to traveling. And really how many are used to it?



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
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    Default

    I'm no vet, but is there a possibility that some pre-existing issue not normally found in a PPE could've been made worse by the pressure changes?

    Article did say there was going to be a necropsy..although not holding out hope that any media will cover the results.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2007
    Posts
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    Default

    I have read that horses are euthanized if they cause a problem, which I honestly don't get. I mean a large plane can't handle a horse kicking, etc? Why can't they just sedate the horse?

    ALso, some folks have posted that the horse is shot. Holy cow, I mean, I don't think I'd want someone shooting a horse, what God forbid if they miss and the bullet goes through the skin of the plane, creating a hole.
    I would think a needle would be a whole lot safer.

    I do have a very needle phobic horse, and I have seen many vets stick that horse as she rears, pulls away, pushes into the vet, etc. so I do believe it can be done. I didn't before I saw the expertise of some of my vets with aiming and sticking and getting a vein. Some sedatives I don't think even need a vein.

    Just curious and wondering what the procedures are and why.

    I mean honestly, if a horse is on a tractor trailer and starts freaking, I have never heard of them being shot, and a tractor trailer weighs a lot less than a plane, and can be a deadly incident too.
    save lives...spay/neuter/geld



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
    Location
    Beyond the pale.
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    2,957

    Default

    oh goodness. horses drop suddenly from mysterious causes in all sorts of locations. What is remarkable is that, with the stress of air travel, container shipping, noise, sedation etc, that it doesn't happen more often.



    The price is also remarkable.
    "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
    Location
    England
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    10,599

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fivehorses View Post
    I have read that horses are euthanized if they cause a problem, which I honestly don't get. I mean a large plane can't handle a horse kicking, etc? Why can't they just sedate the horse?

    ALso, some folks have posted that the horse is shot. Holy cow, I mean, I don't think I'd want someone shooting a horse, what God forbid if they miss and the bullet goes through the skin of the plane, creating a hole.
    I would think a needle would be a whole lot safer.

    I do have a very needle phobic horse, and I have seen many vets stick that horse as she rears, pulls away, pushes into the vet, etc. so I do believe it can be done. I didn't before I saw the expertise of some of my vets with aiming and sticking and getting a vein. Some sedatives I don't think even need a vein.

    Just curious and wondering what the procedures are and why.

    I mean honestly, if a horse is on a tractor trailer and starts freaking, I have never heard of them being shot, and a tractor trailer weighs a lot less than a plane, and can be a deadly incident too.
    Sedatives don't always work and can make the situation worse if the horse reacts badly to them.

    I think it's less about the horse kicking that what would happen if they broke lose- the weight has to be carefully balanced, and having a large, out of control animal lose on a plane sounds like a good way to have a crash.
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2000
    Location
    NY
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    14,977

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kookicat View Post
    Sedatives don't always work and can make the situation worse if the horse reacts badly to them.

    I think it's less about the horse kicking that what would happen if they broke lose- the weight has to be carefully balanced, and having a large, out of control animal lose on a plane sounds like a good way to have a crash.
    I think it's also a risk if the horse could damage the plane enough to make it depressurize at a high altitude. I think that was even in a Dick Francis novel years ago.

    I've flown with horses a few times, but they were not youngsters. Poor horse.



  16. #16
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    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
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    Default

    Pilots have to speak English--it's the language of aviation worldwide so to speak--in order
    to talk with air traffic controllers. At least enough to converse with ATC,
    ground control, etc.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2008
    Posts
    10

    Default chose the airline carefully for your horse

    It depends on the airline whether grooms are allowed during take off and landing.
    Also the level of expierience and education of grooms varies from airline to airline.
    Even the containers vary,some airlines I will not work with for that reason alone....

    KLM for instance has grooms with the horses during TO and Landing and their grooms are people employed by KLM with years of expierience flying horses.Most likely they have more than one person on board per container - the additional grooms are usually horse expierienced people that are selected by the transport company.

    I have been flying with horses for a lot of years (not as a proffessional) and several transport companies and airlines (my own horses and also for others) and my personal choice is for safety reasons KLM.

    uuuh,the stories I could tell.....



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2001
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    3,417

    Default

    Could the pressure change have caused a brain anurisym?

    How soon after take off or landing did this happen?



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,592

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fivehorses View Post
    ALso, some folks have posted that the horse is shot. Holy cow, I mean, I don't think I'd want someone shooting a horse, what God forbid if they miss and the bullet goes through the skin of the plane, creating a hole.
    I would think a needle would be a whole lot safer.

    I mean honestly, if a horse is on a tractor trailer and starts freaking, I have never heard of them being shot, and a tractor trailer weighs a lot less than a plane, and can be a deadly incident too.
    A bullet is a quick and painless way to go, properly done. In fact, it would be my preferred method for my own horses, right here on the ground, if they were badly injured to the point of panic. Nothing makes you embrace a bullet quicker than watching a panicked horse fighting the euth. meds. And more importantly, a bullet keeps the person on the other end of the gun safe from a panicked, thrashing horse. Your vet may feel comfortable stepping in and dealing with your unruly mare, but that's not something that the average horse plane attendant should be required to do.

    I'm no gun expert either, but I doubt the caliber of bullet recommended for euthing horses is strong enough to pierce plane skin.

    Tractor trailers are significantly more sturdy than planes and less responsive to weight shifting thanks to having 18 wheels on the ground and not being suspended in mid air.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2006
    Location
    Oregon
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    3,373

    Default

    Having just imported a pony on Wednesday, this was a scary story to read!

    Wondering if it was a pony or a horse, and worth $140,000 as a yearling?? Wow.

    Condolences to the owner. Waiting excitedly for your new arrival, only to find out it died en route would be awful.
    Family Partners Welsh Ponies - Home of Section B Welsh stallion *Wedderlie Mardi Gras LOM/AOE http://www.welshponies.com
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