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  1. #1
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    Default Breeders' Cup to eliminate raceday meds by 2013




  2. #2
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    This is best news I've heard from the racing industry in a long time.

    Is just unfortunate it can't be implemented sooner. 2yr olds it could certainly be implemented immediately. Next logical step is to get rid of lasix in all stakes races everywhere. By starting with stakes races momentum can be gained to ban it once again in all racing.
    "I am going to have horse racing as my business, and my hobby will be punishing each and every one of you pinheads, so happy blogging you have my attention"
    Michael Gill-2010



  3. #3
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    It's like banning baby aspirin in an attempt to control the drug war. Simply a token to appease the people who don't understand horse racing in my opinion.



  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    It's like banning baby aspirin in an attempt to control the drug war. Simply a token to appease the people who don't understand horse racing in my opinion.
    And what misunderstanding might that be?

    Only misunderstanding as I see it is that so many participants from the backside to the front office have succumbed to the big lie that a TB racehorse can't do one stinking lap around a racetrack without the aid of chemistry. I say BS on that.

    If there's any truth to that then it's high time they start breeding some that can.
    "I am going to have horse racing as my business, and my hobby will be punishing each and every one of you pinheads, so happy blogging you have my attention"
    Michael Gill-2010



  5. #5
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    Am frankly glad to see it happen. Will be interesting to see how training records will change, especiallly for those who have never liked them in the first place. Darn.



  6. #6
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    I think this is a positive step forward and is great news.



  7. #7
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    Bleeding is an anatomical consequence from asking an animal to do something they were not designed to do. They are built for max speed to escape a predator. No predator chases for a mile or more at top speed. All this does is make a return to the days of barbaric practices like withdrawing hay and water for up to three days before a race. Real humane, not but better than letting them swim in their own blood.



  8. #8
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    Do the horses that come over for the Breeder's Cup from another country automatically run on Lasix because they can? I doubt it and I don't think they are put on a starvation regiment either.

    If horses can run in other countries without it - and I am sure they are not starved for 3 days before the race - why can't the U.S. start making an effort to do the same.

    Do you have ideas on how to make racing better in the states? Things need to start somewhere.



  9. #9
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    Yes, they do run on lasix when they come to this country. I do have ideas to improve racing but they do not have anything to do with lasix as I don't believe that needs to be fixed. I would like to see more fan outreach to get them up close and personal with horses and I want a national governing body that oversees retirement funds for horses among other things.



  10. #10
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    True it may be a small step towards fixing a much bigger problem but I personally believe that it is a positive step in the right direction.



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by CVPeg View Post
    A clue is born!
    **********
    Starts with an 'S,' ends with a 'T.' You figure it out.

    **********
    "Houston, Tranquility Base here, picking up where we left off ..."



  12. #12
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    Definitely a step in the right direction. They don't need Lasix in other countries, so why do we need it here? Yes, trainers from other countries use it here, but only because it enhances performance -- I don't blame them.

    If horses truly can't race in this country without Lasix or other drugs, maybe we shouldn't be racing them.

    Let's hope trainers don't start withholding food/water. If they do, there should be serious consequences. Of course, the bad apples are doing stuff like that, and worse, anyway. Unfortunately, it's just part of any sport, especially the ones that include animals.

    It will be interesting to see which bloodlines hold up over the years without Lasix.
    "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."



  13. #13
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    An interesting bit of history and questions that come from the action

    DRF/Steven Crist, July 15 2011 "Breeders' Cup's Lasix stance no overall fix"

    excerpt

    Horses who used Lasix in other jurisdictions were not permitted to race on it when they came to New York for races such as the Belmont Stakes or the fall championship events such as the Woodward and Jockey Club Gold, and for the 1990 Breeders’ Cup at Belmont Park. New York was the last major racing state to ban Lasix until throwing in the towel in 1994, just in time for the 1995 Breeders’ Cup at Belmont.

    Alysheba, the first Derby winner known to have raced on Lasix, was not permitted to run with it when he bid for the Triple Crown in the 1987 Belmont. Jack Van Berg, his trainer, blamed the colt’s fourth-place finish on an impatient ride rather than the lack of medication. He did not race again in New York until the fall of 1988, when his owners, somewhat stung by criticism that the colt had not won a race without it, sent him out to an authoritative Lasix-free Woodward victory.

    The 1990 Triple Crown season was filled with talk of Lasix. Unbridled and Summer Squall used it en route to their respective Derby and Preakness victories, then Summer Squall skipped the Belmont in large pert because of the Lasix ban and never raced in New York again. Unbridled ran fourth in that Belmont without it, but later that fall won the last Lasix-free Breeders’ Cup Classic. Cigar, widely considered the top racehorse of the 1990’s, used Lasix in 15 of his 16 straight victories from 1994 to 1996, but ran just as well without it in two starts in New York and one in Dubai.
    It’s an uncomfortable situation when you have one set of rules for a handful of championship races and star horses and another for all the rest. As things stand, we’re going to see Breeders’ Cup cards where the seven or eight Cup races will be run without medication, but the B’s and L’s will still be there for the supporting races on the undercard. Advocates say they had to start somewhere and hope this is the start of a massive rollback in raceday medication throughout the sport. Detractors are already rolling their eyes and saying that a Breeders’ Cup-only ban is nothing but a hypocritical and cosmetic attempt to appease critics.

    It will be interesting to see how horsemen cope with a Lasix-free Breeders’ Cup in 2013 after more than two decades where over 90 percent of the starters used it – but even more interesting to see if it affects more than two of the 365 days a year of American racing.



  14. #14
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    European horses run on other meds. Not legal ones.
    * www.huntersrest.net -- Virginia hunt country's best Bed-and-Breakfast-and-Barn.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunter's Rest View Post
    European horses run on other meds. Not legal ones.
    Exactly! But the average Joe doesn't know that so do away with lasix so we can pretend we are cleaning up racing for appearances sake. What they don't know doesn't hurt anybody but the horses.



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    Bleeding is an anatomical consequence from asking an animal to do something they were not designed to do. They are built for max speed to escape a predator. No predator chases for a mile or more at top speed.
    They don't? Can you sight your sources?



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunter's Rest View Post
    European horses run on other meds. Not legal ones.
    LOL. So do U.S. horses. People cheat. Let's hope they get caught.

    Doesn't mean we shouldn't try to run a clean sport and have everyone on a level playing field. Cheaters suck. Thank goodness there are lots of good, honest people in racing, too.
    "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    Bleeding is an anatomical consequence from asking an animal to do something they were not designed to do.
    Truth of the matter is that an extremely small segment of them actually bleed. Why is lasix not used in the morning? Why is it not needed for breezing? Fact of the matter is that trainers will do whatever they have to do from injecting blood from another horse up their nose to making them inhale barbed wire just to be able to use it.

    Check out the book Run Baby Run by Bill Heller. Is a real good read folks
    "I am going to have horse racing as my business, and my hobby will be punishing each and every one of you pinheads, so happy blogging you have my attention"
    Michael Gill-2010



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacchus View Post
    LOL. So do U.S. horses. People cheat. Let's hope they get caught.

    Doesn't mean we shouldn't try to run a clean sport and have everyone on a level playing field. Cheaters suck. Thank goodness there are lots of good, honest people in racing, too.
    This is for the most part what lasix is all about. As for performance enhancement that's debateable. 1st time use yes, but it seems to have an adverse effect on many horses too. The thing that makes it drsireable is that it masks many other things from testing.

    Historically it was a cheaters drug in it's own right in the '60s and '70s. It couldn't be tested for so eventually racing jurisdictions caved and allowed it's use as long as it was declared.
    "I am going to have horse racing as my business, and my hobby will be punishing each and every one of you pinheads, so happy blogging you have my attention"
    Michael Gill-2010



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Profidia View Post
    Truth of the matter is that an extremely small segment of them actually bleed. Why is lasix not used in the morning? Why is it not needed for breezing? Fact of the matter is that trainers will do whatever they have to do from injecting blood from another horse up their nose to making them inhale barbed wire just to be able to use it.

    Check out the book Run Baby Run by Bill Heller. Is a real good read folks
    Define "actually bleed." As I've stated before, a small amount of undetected blood can be just as dangerous as the two nostril gusher.

    Some trainers do use lasix in the morning for breezes, usually for horses with a history of bleeding.

    Very hard to take your position seriously when your ignorance on the subject is so telling.



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