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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2011
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    578

    Default Anyone ever picked up and moved to a new city?

    I'm kind of over my current city. Moved here mostly out of convenience, but also thought I would love it and just don't. Not a lot of riding opportunity within reasonable distance of where I work, hate the weather, have some family but not a ton of good friends here... basically not seeing a lot of reasons to hang around. Job is OK, but I could definitely be ready for something new.

    So, anyone ever just picked up and moved? I'm trying to figure out how to do the job hunt - do I move first with a financial cushion, then find something? Do I find a job first, then go? It would most likely be further than a day's driving, so in-person interviews could be tricky.

    Any tips? Advice (for or against the move)? Cautionary tales?
    If the pony spits venom in your face or produces a loud roar, it is probably not a pony. Find another. -The Oatmeal



  2. #2
    redsoxluvr Guest

    Default

    I transferred from Phoenix to Atlanta, then back again. When we decided to go back to Phoenix I started sending out resumes. I did not get one call. Once I figured out that no one was calling me because I was out of state, I obtained an in-state address and phone #. My phone then started ringing. When I set up interviews, I would just tell the recruiter that I was out of town and was available xxxx date.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2008
    Location
    Outside Ocala FL - Horse Capital of the World
    Posts
    6,190

    Default

    My case is unusual, I planned the move from CT to FL first, had a bit of financial cushion, but got lucky that my CT company offered a telecommuting position for me, so I now work from home in my new town/state.

    I was planning on looking for work once we had move here. My husband had to look for work, and it was not as easy as we thought it would be, but it all worked out in the end.
    There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2006
    Location
    Cheesehead in Loudoun Co, VA
    Posts
    2,483

    Default

    Well...

    Exactly 5 years ago yesterday, I arrived in NoVA from WI.

    I googled my chosen field and applied for positions in Wyoming, Florida and Virginia. The only one that called was my current position, the one I most wanted. They set up a phone interview which I did in my living room. I'd been out of my chosen field for about 18 months so I did some serious studying so that I didn't sound like a complete imbecile. I also prayed that the dog & cats would stay quiet! They did, but it would have been OK as my boss actually MEOWED when we talked about moving cats across the country (his family has more critters than mine)

    I was offered the position and then needed to find housing for me, 4 cats and 2 horses. So I came to COTH and found both plus a PT job cleaning stalls on weekends

    I moved out here sight unseen except for online aerial photos. I was scared to death that I was moving into a crappy neighborhood or a crappy house or another crappy job. I had less than $600 to my name and one credit card with a low limit that I quickly maxed with all the start up fees I didn't know I had to pay (like a $200 deposit for water). For better or worse, I was stuck here. I'm still digging out of the financial hole, but who isn't these days?

    The job is still great. The neighborhood had a drive-by shooting 2 weeks after I moved in, but that WAS a step up from the drug house I used to live across from and the love triangle turned murder/suicide/attempted murder just half a block away (and that was the good side of town).

    The entire process took 6 weeks from google to move in.

    A year later, Mr. Landlord #1 let my rental go into foreclosure and I moved to my current "de-lux apartment in the sk-yi-yi." This neighborhood is quiet except for the wedding tent across the street. I'm also within walking distance to work, 20 minutes from my horses. Can't beat it!

    Of course, I managed to luck into all this just before everything crashed. One of our programmers left last month and we had to give up 30K of our budget just to fill her very necessary position rather than leave it vacant for a full year. We had 38 applicants.

    My son seems to share my sense of adventure. He landed a temporary job in Kentucky last year. He drove there with his car full of stuff. And no place to stay other than a motel. His boss found him housing in a cheap long-term motel after almost 2 weeks.

    This fall, he's moving to Blacksburg to be near his GF while she finishes her degree & he starts his own. He still has no housing or job...

    If I were to move again (when pigs fly), I would not go sight unseen nor would I move without a financial cushion.
    I'm not arguing, I'm just explaining why I'm right
    Violence doesn't end violence. It extends it. Break the cycle.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2001
    Posts
    2,502

    Default

    Done it once, would do it again, but learned a lot.

    I went from Minneapolis to Lincoln (Nebraska) to work for USDF. It turns out working for a job with a horse organization is still an office job, and doesn't pay well enough to keep your own horse. It also turns out eastern Nebraska is *really* hot and humid in the summer. Hot I understand, humid I did not expect. I also hate the wind in the winter (cold temps I can handle but I will never get used to the howling wind).

    I've made two resolutions with regard to relocation: I will never again relocate to a place where I haven't had an interest in living just for a job, and I will never take a significant pay cut and decrease in standard of living again. Luckily, I was very young when I made the move and have made up the career income nicely. If you move just for a job, or if your job is the only thing you have, if things aren't going well life can look pretty bleak.

    If I were to move again, I would definitely look for a city that attracts a lot of transplants, where it is easier to be a newcomer. The people I know and work with in Lincoln have the same friends they have had since high school and college, and most folks here aren't looking to expand their social circle. As evidenced on another thread, I'm an INTJ brand of introvert, so I'm not an outgoing, social butterfly kind of person. Three of my best friends live out of state, and my best friend here is also a horse person and a transplant.

    USDF moved to Lexington a while after I moved here, and I totally thought I would return to Minneapolis or perhaps go to Denver, but instead I got a job in a different industry, progressed through the ranks, and (although it's hard to believe sometimes!) I'm still here. What keeps me in Lincoln, a city many flee from? Low cost of living and high quality of life: I live 1.5 miles from work, 5.5 miles from the barn, have a professional job where I can wear jeans and also leave at will to meet the farrier or vet, and generally like the life I have.

    Think about the kind of life you want, what's going to make you happy, and what kind of place is the best for that. I've grown to really like the life I have in Lincoln, but I would likely enjoy a similarly smallish metro area with the combination of a good job market for my skills and a low cost of living that allows me to keep horses in my life and live comfortably. And it would help if it were less humid!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
    Posts
    4,777

    Default

    Our family moved often as Dad was always looking to improve our lot. Granted this was between 1945-1966 and I am the youngest of 5 kids.
    Dad would either have a job lined up or would go to the next city to locate a job. While there he would locate a house in a 'good' neighborhood then have Mom move us. One move involved 5 kids (ages 14 to 3), a dog, cat with kittens, bird, goldfish and Grandma. I really don't know how Mom made it. Mom and Dad moved into the last city in 1966, so Dad scratched his itchy foot by moving to different houses within the same city. Five houses from 1966-1983.

    To your question - I would take a vacation to the community you are thinking about moving. Check out employment and housing opportunities - find out if business is moving in or out or steady. You know the type of lifestyle you expect, see if in a week's time you believe you can find "it" there.

    Something to think about right now. This economy is horrible right now and you need to weight the pros and cons of leaving current current position for a new one. Too many companies are closing their doors right now. In fact my husband sold products to one company for 20+ years, and was helping them with new project when they closed last week - one day all gung ho, the next closed.
    Granted neither position has a guarantee, but moving is expensive and will chew up some or all of your current savings. Take a look around but consider not moving until the economy is stronger or make certain you have a really strong financial safety-net before moving
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2008
    Location
    Greeley, Colorado
    Posts
    3,824

    Default

    I'm curious to hear the answers to this as I am beginning the process of doing this myself! It's going to be a HUGE move for me too (NC to CO).
    **Friend of bar.ka**

    Fils Du Reverdy (Revy)- 1993 Selle Francais Gelding
    My equine soulmate



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    8,582

    Default

    Don't move without a job in the new location. It is always easier to get a new job, and a better salary when you are already employed. If they think you're desperate then you might not get the salary you want. If I was hiring I would be much more impressed with the person who lived elsewhere, really wanted to move, and could be there in a reasonable amount of time, over the person that shows up after quitting the other job and has no idea if they really want to live in the new city, and knows nothing about it.

    I know quite a few people who have made major relocations, but they got the job first. I believe they put a sentence at the bottom of the resume that they were living in XXX, but wanted to live in future city, and knew all about it, and could be there in two weeks after hiring and would be ready for work. One friend got the job, arranged the move, and reported there in two weeks-he also rented an apartment online and was ok with it (he had dogs and this place took him with the dogs and was near work) for the year. You might say that you know that you will have to pay your own relocation, and are fine with that.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2001
    Posts
    2,502

    Default

    Agree 100% with JanM. I would relocate again for a job, but I would not relocate without a job lined up.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
    Location
    Center of the Universe
    Posts
    6,903

    Default

    done it three times, including one coast to the other coast, but get the job lined up FIRST.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,903

    Default

    Job first, by all means, even in a good economy. And that financial cushion,
    as big as possible.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2007
    Posts
    9

    Default

    I did this a few years ago. I looked at two vastly different locations and traveled to both multiple times. I considered lifestyle, connections and ease of making friends, climate, how both would fit my horse lifestyle, etc. The option I selected is where I still live.

    When it came to job searching, I sent resumes and advised that I would be in the City during a particular week. I got a great response when I made myself available; it was not a problem that I was not living there yet. I received multiple job offers while I was still interviewing that week.

    Once I had a job, I arranged a start date for a month later and used that time to travel down to arrange housing, pack, etc. It is much easier and less stressful to allow yourself time to move. Plus, where you want to live, if in a larger city, will depend upon where your job is located.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    8,582

    Default

    By the way, you can save almost 50% packing and unpacking by yourself. You can usually get used boxes from moving companies (some will give them to you if they're moving you). And medium plastic storage containers are great for moving, and especially for storing items safely without water damage or insects moving in. The big dish pack or other large boxes are only good for light things like winter clothes, linens, or other things that won't hurt you to move. Mark everything very well with contents and room they go in.

    Be very careful about taking someone off the internet over a moving company you have recommendations on. There are too many cases of some fly-by-night company low balling the price, and then when your furniture arrives you have to give them a lot of money on the spot or you don't get your furniture.

    Before you even visit, go to realtor.com and look at housing prices, availability, and look at message boards (like city-data) to see if you really want to consider it. No sense in moving to a place you can't afford, don't like after all, and you're stuck until you can move.

    Look at local newspapers, and that should give you a good feel for the activities, lifestyle and other local factors. When you narrow it down to an area or a few cities then come back here and ask about the horse activities, especially for your particular interests and needs. It wouldn't be good to move somewhere and then find out whatever you like to do isn't really available or is to expensive to be doable.
    Last edited by JanM; Jul. 3, 2011 at 08:20 PM.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 20, 2006
    Location
    wyoming
    Posts
    523

    Default

    Yes, we moved around the country many times. Hubby and I called it the "itchy feet" syndrome. We were both in jobs where we could move fairly easily, and so when we got bored, we did. Now we are both self employed, so it would be even easier, but we don't have itchy feet anymore. Much.

    Anyway, it's best to have a job lined up where you are going, especially in this economy. Be sure to check state income tax rates - they could be much higher where you are going. If you are going to buy property, check the property tax rates for the same reason. If you are going to rent, make sure there places to rent - in this economy, rental property is at a premium in some areas. It's always best to have a place to live lined up in advance, if possible. If you have pets, be aware that it may be nearly impossible to find places to rent in some areas.

    Good luck!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Collingwood,ON
    Posts
    1,383

    Default

    I just did this 3 months ago. I've lived in the lower mainland of BC most of my life, as did my significant other. I have been wanting to buy horse property for a long time, but BC is so expensive compared to other parts of the country. I started looking on realtors' websites and realized that Ontario is WAY cheaper than BC. Called up a pal from grad school who is from Ottawa originally, asked him if there was a job at his company and had a job offer within a week. I did visit Ottawa once (for about 5 days) before accepting the job. I'm really glad I made the move. SO and I put all of our belonging in the back our two horse trailer and drove across the country. My horse came on a commercial horse van line. The first few months were tough as SO didn't find a job right away, but now things are going swimmingly. I definitely wouldn't recommend moving unless you have a job lined up first.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2007
    Posts
    1,154

    Default

    I did. Moved from CA to TN 6 years ago, no job, just moved. Hooked up with a temp agency quickly, worked there 9 months, then got a full time job.

    You can live well in fly-over states compared to CA. Go for quality of life first, then worry about work. Try to live within commuting distance of bigger city.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    Have done it quite a bit. Spent the first 22 years of my life in my hometown (IA) then moved to Italy. Then to WI, then Chicago, then TX, then MI, Mauritius, MI. Have lived in three different towns in MI, all very different from each other. But I've been here for almost 8 years now. It looks like we'll be moving to DC then overseas soonish so I'm excited for another opportunity.

    I think that as long as you have work lined up, you can pretty much make anything work out. For a year at least.

    I would not move w/o a job though. And it sure doesn't hurt to go visit before making the commitment.

    Good luck!

    I think that the adventure of being in a new places is GREAT fun. I know that it's not everyone's cup o' tea. But I sure enjoy it.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 4, 2007
    Location
    Crossville, TN
    Posts
    1,142

    Default

    I have done this a few times! Grew up in Southern Maryland moved to Houston, TX at 19 with no job and no really plan but made it work and graduated from the University of Houston. After graduation I moved to Charlotte, NC and stayed with my cousin until I found a job and could get my own apartment. While in Charlotte I met my now DH and he got a job in Japan so I got a job in Japan and followed him over! Unfortunately it didn't work out for me there so back to Houston I went until we found our farm outside of Lexington, KY.

    Very happy now where we are but you never know what the future holds. My best advice is to be optimistic and always on the lookout for new friends It is an adventure and remember that if you don't like it there you can always move again! I don't care to live in Charlotte or Houston ever again but I gave it a try! lol



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,402

    Default

    My employer spans the nation so putting in for a transfer wasn't too hard. My MIL lived close by the location I picked, and we took a vacation during March.
    We didn't do 100% of our due diligence though - towns here have a 2.5% employment tax levied by the town you work in. Ouch. Property taxes are pretty low but reassessed promptly every year. Car registration pretty cheap, gas was cheaper but they've raised state taxes as of July 1. Food was a little cheaper but this isn't a foodie area so no good delis or restaurants out in the sticks - Subway has to do or downtown Lex.

    We didn't really check out town as much as we should have either partly because my MIL hadn't moved to Timbuctoo yet - once I started driving from her new house to work I figured I'd be dead from a car wreck within 6 months so I picked the nicest cheap close by apartment complex in a moderately crappy area. The complex was OK and Lexington is not a real gang infested tough urban city, not at all, so my apartment was fine.

    It's tough to have to put together a whole new network of friends and find all the support services like a good mechanic, I'd rather not do it again I don't think.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Posts
    1,830

    Default

    I think the answer will vary a bit depending on what kinds of jobs you are qualified for and what the cost of living in in your targeted area.

    I live in an area with a high cost of living and hideous traffic. The hiring managers I've dealt with divide jobs into two categories: high skill/high pay and common skill/low pay. They are willing to interview non-locals for high end jobs but not the low end jobs. Employers who need highly skilled staff understand they are recruiting from a fairly mobile workforce. The workers could easily have grown up in one area, gone to college elsewhere, and got graduate degrees at a university in yet a third geographical area. Uprooting and moving for a really good job opportunity is no big deal to someone who is rootless to start.

    In contrast, the employers I know are very reluctant to recruit someone non-local for a low end job. Discovering that the only dwelling they can afford is an hour commute from the office, and that the local pay does not make up for the high cost of living tends to make a lot of non-natives tuck tail and run home. Employers have been burned too often by people from outside the region quitting after few months, so they prefer to hire locals for jobs not requiring advanced degrees.



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