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  1. #1
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    Feb. 23, 2008
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    Default Hans-Heinrich Meyer zu Strohen: "No Success Without Effort"

    http://www.eurodressage.com/equestri...without-effort

    I rode with him when the Hannoverian Verband sent him here to clinic with the members at Glenwood Farms. Nothing but the highest praise for his teaching, his horsemanship, and his knowledge. I would ride again with him in a heart beat.

    None the less, it's sad to hear his comments on the young riders of our sport today. I know so many young people who would gladly trade in a heartbeat of a good horse and a chance in this sport- without cell phone chit chat or lack of basic good manners. Such a shame that only the wealthy have the hope of making it- what spoiled babies they are!



  2. #2
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    Jun. 6, 2005
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    Oh please, stop with the class warfare already. Bad manners and spoiled children run the gambit of class and income. Have you missed toddlers in tiaras?

    Just blame all the hippies who named their kids flower and autum, and didn't see fit to teach them thank you and please.



  3. #3
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    Aug. 27, 2009
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    I was surprised to hear his young rider description as being in Germany. I can see this all too clearly in the U.S. Im tempted to say: iT isnt fair, It isnt fair!!! In a temper trantrum fashion of course. ,Because in many cases it isnt fair. It's sickning.

    But I know the good riders who work hard and support themselves the whole way know the value of what it is they are really doing. And I honestly believe that most people who know their salt recognize this.



  4. #4
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    Aug. 27, 2009
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    Default

    P.S. Im not a Training level rider anymore. I dont have a clue how to change that. Should I care?



  5. #5
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    Jan. 29, 2002
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    This cracked me up.

    ST.GEORG: Apparently as pony team trainer you once didn't allow a pony rider to go to the German championships because she was too fat. Is this right?

    HHMZS: Yes that is right. The child was so fat, it just didn't look good and neither the parents, nor the child wanted to realise that. I told them I'm not taking these tons on the road. We had a huge fall-out and they filed a complaint, but at the end the directors of the federation judged in my favour.



  6. #6
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    Mar. 3, 2010
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    Georgia
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    1,523

    Default

    I love his manner in the saddle, and now that I've read that, I love his manner out of it, too.
    "Rock n' roll's not through, yeah, I'm sewing wings on this thing." --Destroyer
    http://dressagescriblog.wordpress.com/



  7. #7
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    Oct. 10, 2006
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    Gotham City
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ToN Farm View Post
    This cracked me up.

    ST.GEORG: Apparently as pony team trainer you once didn't allow a pony rider to go to the German championships because she was too fat. Is this right?

    HHMZS: Yes that is right. The child was so fat, it just didn't look good and neither the parents, nor the child wanted to realise that. I told them I'm not taking these tons on the road. We had a huge fall-out and they filed a complaint, but at the end the directors of the federation judged in my favour.
    Great, kid qualifies for the national championship and trainer says, sorry, kid isn't pretty enough. Gee, Georg, what is too fat? Are you related to the American Saint George, by any chance? Hope kid doesn't end up with an eating disorder.
    "Go on, Bill — this is no place for a pony."



  8. #8
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    Dec. 2, 2002
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    Waterford, VA USA
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    I was just told about a study that was done in the US regarding the current generation (20-year olds), and it seems that they are not able to take criticism well at all. This apparently is caused by all the "positive encouragement at all cost" during their formative years.

    For some reason this doesn't surprise me....
    Siegi Belz
    www.stalleuropa.com
    2007 KWPN-NA Breeder of the Year
    Dutch Warmbloods Made in the U. S. A.



  9. #9
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    Feb. 23, 2008
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    147

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by InWhyCee Redux View Post
    Hope kid doesn't end up with an eating disorder.
    I think the kid already HAS an eating disorder.

    Geez, the tolerance and support for the undisciplined is amazing!

    My groom is barely 20 years old, and needs to lose AT LEAST 50 lbs. I have never seen her on a horse, and boy, I DON'T WANT TO. It's been bad enough looking at her in her tight summer clothes- makes me wonder if she owns a mirror!

    She's a very very nice girl, super good with the horses, helpful, sweet, and I'm glad to have her working for me. On the ground. Call me an intolerant jerk, but when she bends down and exposes all in the low rider fashion they all wear, I want to puke.

    THIS reaction is NORMAL, yes NORMAL. I don't know when it became PC for the obese, but it's NOT normal for the human body to carry around 7 months of pregnancy in fat.

    A local trainer here has had a continuing problem with her thyroid, and you guessed it, she's unfortunately put on the pounds. All around her chest and middle. When she rides, the ENTIRE front of her body flops up and down with every stride. I find it so distracting I can hardly see what her horse is doing.....it looks absolutely AWFUL. Put that in a coat and it still looks -AWFUL. (She's at her wits end about it, and struggles to lose the weight, and has kept it at least from getting worse, but there's no way it's attractive. And she certainly knows it.)

    I don't blame Hans Heinrich one bit for refusing to ignore the elephant in the room- I applaud him. He's entirely correct- in the absense of a medical issue, it's a question of discipline and drive. When you don't take care of your body and don't keep it in athletic condition, you're simply not serious about sport.



  10. #10
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    Feb. 23, 2008
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    147

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    Quote Originally Posted by siegi b. View Post
    I was just told about a study that was done in the US regarding the current generation (20-year olds), and it seems that they are not able to take criticism well at all. This apparently is caused by all the "positive encouragement at all cost" during their formative years.

    For some reason this doesn't surprise me....
    Don't blast the 20 somethings- my young riders are amazing- self disciplined, engaged, purposeful, intelligent, hard HARD working. They are very inspiring- so not everyone can be painted with the same brush.

    Only thing they don't see is dirt- if it's hiding under a cover I guess you see dirt better with older eyes.



  11. #11
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    Oct. 10, 2006
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    Gotham City
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    Quote Originally Posted by siegi b. View Post
    I was just told about a study that was done in the US regarding the current generation (20-year olds), and it seems that they are not able to take criticism well at all. This apparently is caused by all the "positive encouragement at all cost" during their formative years.

    For some reason this doesn't surprise me....
    I grew up in the 70s singing along to "Free to Be You and Me" and expressing my tiny self as was the hippie-dippie New Age fashion -- doesn't mean I wasn't also taught discipline and how to accept criticism.
    "Go on, Bill — this is no place for a pony."



  12. #12
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    Dec. 23, 2010
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    Lancashire UK, formerly Region 8
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    I tend to agree that the problem doesn't really lie with a particular generation, or class, or nationality, etc... but I DO think that society in general has a big problem with people underestimating the value or necessity of hard work. We have somehow evolved into a society in which people are proud of their limitations and shortcomings, and while I am the first to root for the underdog and advocate equal opportunities everywhere, I really dislike the blatant lack of a work ethic in today's world. I suspect though that those that TRULY succeed are those that are still willing to make signficant personal sacrifice and put less stock in convenience. I think all sports - including dressage - are helpful in fostering those skills.



  13. #13
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    Jan. 29, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by HSS View Post
    I think the kid already HAS an eating disorder.
    Good one. And good post HSS.

    Probably belongs on the current multi-page fatty thread, but every time I go to the super market, all I see is overweight teens with low rider shorts with fat hanging over the middle. More often than not, when I see a group shot of a college equestrian team, or even a group of FEI young riders, I see some that are overweight and clearly on their way to obese adults. Aside from being fit for riding, don't women care what they look like anymore? Is vanity a lost thing?



  14. #14
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    Jun. 10, 2011
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    The other Washington
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    I think what angers me is when an obese person...be it a child or an adult..blames someone else for their inability to accomplish something. Don't blame the restaurant for serving fatty foods...no one holds a gun to ones head and forces them to drink that soft drink!

    When I hear an obese girl complain that her HORSE is to blame for not wanting to do what it was trained to do, when the instructor says for the hundredth time, "he isn't responding because your leg is NOT on the horse"...there's something wrong there. Or when a grown woman shrieks and curses a hapless clerk at the tack shop about trying to pass off 'damaged goods' (in this case, the woman had forced her size 18 frame into a size 12 breeches and they split up the seam), (and in this case, the clerk was me) the situation has changed.
    It's no longer the woman accepting the fact that she was fat. She did not want to purchase a pair of breeches that would fit her, because it had her size prominently displayed on it.
    Perhaps she didn't want everyone to know that she needed a large size...as if we couldn't SEE she needed a large size? None of the staff was blind. We had all been trained on how to fit customers. My manager stepped in and tried to steer her-very politely-to the larger size rack and the woman snapped her head off. She "wasn't a size 18! We were just doing bait and switch and trying to make her buy the more expensive (and expansive) breeches."
    Not only did the woman damage the too small pair of breeches, she then loudly denied damaging them, told me what my IQ was (lower than room temperature, apparently) and how horrible the shop was, and left. Without paying for the breeches she'd ripped.
    Her last words were "I'm never coming back here." and we all, to a woman or a man, said, 'how do we thank you?"

    I don't hold a person's weight against them. I don't care what a person looks like. Some of use are tall, short, thin, fat. Who cares? What I resent is when an obese person denies the obvious, that it is their weight that is causing the problem. I resent it when an obese person twists their physical problem into YOUR 'intolerance', 'bias', or 'prejudice'. I resent it when they use their obesity as a weapon.
    The best thing to do on a golf course is a GALLOP!



  15. #15
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    Feb. 23, 2008
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    147

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    Quote Originally Posted by hrsmstr View Post
    I don't hold a person's weight against them. I don't care what a person looks like. Some of use are tall, short, thin, fat. Who cares? What I resent is when an obese person denies the obvious, that it is their weight that is causing the problem. I resent it when an obese person twists their physical problem into YOUR 'intolerance', 'bias', or 'prejudice'. I resent it when they use their obesity as a weapon.
    Yeah, in my business some of our customers are-------big drum roll here------------ethnic minorities So, if we tell one of them "NO" about something, 2 times out of 10 they pull the "race card". Using race as a weapon to get what they want.

    Doesn't work though but we all find it highly insulting.



  16. #16
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    Oct. 11, 2007
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    Andover, MA
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    Maybe I run with weird people, but I rarely if ever see people pull the obesity card. I do hear plenty of disgust from the other side, though; I work with doctors and they are mostly fairly thin, and in some cases (all younger female doctors) very, very thin. I also hear genuine concern, since they are high-risk OBs and have the occasional morbidly obese patient, and yes, obesity is definitely a factor in high risk pregnancies.

    My barn's a mix; the BO is frighteningly skinny (5'2" or so and under 100 pounds I'm sure, not a bit of body fat anywhere), none of the adult riders are obese but a few of us are overweight, and the teens/young adults are mostly normal weight and a few are thin; the most competitive (not necessarily in a good way) is a little fat.

    WRT the original article -- I do wonder how fat the "fat" rider on the pony was. Was it that she was fat enough to really affect her riding, or was Herr zu Strohen merely not wanting to be known as the trainer who allowed a "fat" rider to show? (sort of how some fashion designers don't want their stuff to exist in larger sizes than 8 or so, because they don't want to be known for designing for "fat people".)
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by Mythic Feronia, 1998 Morgan mare; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine



  17. #17
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    Oct. 10, 2006
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    Gotham City
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    Quote Originally Posted by quietann View Post
    Maybe I run with weird people, but I rarely if ever see people pull the obesity card. I do hear plenty of disgust from the other side, though; I work with doctors and they are mostly fairly thin, and in some cases (all younger female doctors) very, very thin. I also hear genuine concern, since they are high-risk OBs and have the occasional morbidly obese patient, and yes, obesity is definitely a factor in high risk pregnancies.

    My barn's a mix; the BO is frighteningly skinny (5'2" or so and under 100 pounds I'm sure, not a bit of body fat anywhere), none of the adult riders are obese but a few of us are overweight, and the teens/young adults are mostly normal weight and a few are thin; the most competitive (not necessarily in a good way) is a little fat.

    WRT the original article -- I do wonder how fat the "fat" rider
    on the pony was. Was it that she was fat enough to really
    affect her riding, or was Herr zu Strohen merely not wanting to
    be known as the trainer who allowed a "fat" rider to show?
    (sort of how some fashion designers don't want their stuff to
    exist in larger sizes than 8 or so, because they don't want to be
    known for designing for "fat people".)
    I'm curious too -- the rider qualified for an event, how grossly obese could
    she have been to have made it that far?

    And you're right -- some high-end designers won't go into production over 8 or 10, or if they do it's basically a special order; the samples sent to magazines and catalogues are usually 2 to 4--and we're taking a very slender 2 to 4.
    "Go on, Bill — this is no place for a pony."



  18. #18
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    Mar. 25, 2011
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    Pennsylvania
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    I call BS on the idea that this was an issue of the kid not being able to take criticism. "You need to be more fit", "Your lack of fitness is getting in the way of your goals" - that's criticism. "You're too fat and you don't look right on a horse" is shaming. Shaming is seldom constructive. And to say that it's an example of people not being able to take criticism is disingenuous. Basically that kind of reasoning is - you humiliate the victim and he falls apart and this means he has a weak character. I say it means you're not a nice person.

    I'd like to also suggest that people who pull the race card probably do so more often than you think they should because they've been conditioned by being discriminated against so they see race issues around every corner. They do not deserve contempt for that. Racism exists in our country like classism exists in Trinidad and we are all affected by it. People don't become super sensitive to it in a vacuum.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  19. #19
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    Apr. 30, 2009
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    Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by HSS View Post
    A local trainer here has had a continuing problem with her thyroid, and you guessed it, she's unfortunately put on the pounds. All around her chest and middle. When she rides, the ENTIRE front of her body flops up and down with every stride. I find it so distracting I can hardly see what her horse is doing.....it looks absolutely AWFUL. Put that in a coat and it still looks -AWFUL. (She's at her wits end about it, and struggles to lose the weight, and has kept it at least from getting worse, but there's no way it's attractive. And she certainly knows it.)
    I have this friend with cancer and she looks like hell. Her skin is a really funny color and she looks like death warmed over. I hate riding with her because it is very distracting. She isn't as good at riding now either and should quit because it NOT becoming. I think she realizes it too!


    You just criticized someone's appearance because of a health issue. WOW. There is a big difference between someone that eats too many Ding Dongs and doesn't move and a person with a health condition. I wrote the above to make a point. I had a best friend that had cancer and was on prednisone, she had a round face and she gained weight. While you notice these things, I never thought of her as distracting and AWEFUL. I saw someone who had more on her plate than fitting into a size 6. I thought she was beautiful because of her spirit and her ability to keep going. But I guess you notice the things that you value. I personally would admire a lady that keep riding even though it may be physically uncomfortable and she may be the subject of ridicule by other riders because of the symptoms of her condition.



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by siegi b. View Post
    I was just told about a study that was done in the US regarding the current generation (20-year olds), and it seems that they are not able to take criticism well at all. This apparently is caused by all the "positive encouragement at all cost" during their formative years.

    For some reason this doesn't surprise me....





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