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  1. #1
    ponies4evur Guest

    Default Dressage Bloodlines

    I'm not very familiar with any type of bloodlines from any discipline, but what are the really top-notch, high end dressage bloodlines? Specifically you would want to look for if purchasing or breeding.

    I might have not worded that correctly...I apologize if I didn't.



  2. #2
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    There's a lot. I peronally like to see Donnerhall, Rubenstein or Weltmeyer up close.



  3. #3
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    Brentano II gives super rideability, as in willing partners with good minds. He's considered one of the top stallions in recent breeding history.

    Wanted to add, have heard that Weltmeyers can be difficult.

    The problem with choosing bloodlines is that no one tells the horse what he's supposed to be. In Europe they send a lot of purpose bred horses to slaughter because the animals can't do the job. They also sell many to the US as cheap hunters since that discipline isn't practiced there.



  4. #4
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    There are lots out there.

    Donnerhall
    Negro
    Gribaldi
    Sandro Hit
    Havidoff
    Painted Black
    Krack C


    those are just a few of the many good dressage stallions out there



  5. #5
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    For German bred dressage horses most people gravitate towards the "Big 5" bloodlines:

    Donnerhall
    RubInstein (not RubEnstein)
    Weltmeyer
    Sandro Hit
    Florestan

    For Dutch bred these names come up over and over:
    Flemmingh
    Ferro
    Jazz



  6. #6
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    agree with bloodlines mentioned!

    As a side note, know a lot of breeders in Germany, and noone sends their less suited horses to slaughter. Perhaps very old or in other ways injured. For lesser stellar horses, they sell inexpensive as pleasure horses.
    Linda Woltz
    www.walnut-farm.com
    standing Benidetto (Belissimo M/SPS COrdoba)



  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by honeylips View Post
    For German bred dressage horses most people gravitate towards the "Big 5" bloodlines:

    Donnerhall
    RubInstein (not RubEnstein)
    Weltmeyer
    Sandro Hit
    Florestan

    For Dutch bred these names come up over and over:
    Flemmingh
    Ferro
    Jazz
    One thing to be aware of is the naming systems of the different registries. The german registries (hannoverian (sp?) and oldenburg being the largest) Will in general name the offspring using the same first letter. Thus Donnerhall has sired the "D" line famous Donnerhall stallion sons include De Niro, Don Schufro, ........ Sandro Hit has Sir Donnerhall, Stedinger.

    Most of the top german dressage horses will trace back to one of the 5 lines that honeylips pointed out "D" "F" "R" "S" "W"

    The Dutch KWPN uses a diifferent naming system so the horses are named depending on the year that they were born. This year is "G".

    It gets complicated in that a stallion can be approved by a lot of registries. Donnerhall was oldenburg his son De Niro is hannovarian De Niro's son Voice is KWPN



  8. #8
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    Also remember you aren't just looking at the stallion line. The mare contributes significantly to the horse's ability and personality...



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by honeylips View Post
    For German bred dressage horses most people gravitate towards the "Big 5" bloodlines:

    Donnerhall
    RubInstein (not RubEnstein)
    Weltmeyer
    Sandro Hit
    Florestan
    While he IS very popular, I would hesitate to put SH in the same class as Donnerhall, Rubinstein, Weltmeyer & Florestan.

    At this point he has yet to prove himself as a sire of upper level horses, however his get are doing very well in the lower levels..

    I would also add Hohenstein to the group, especially for ammies, as I know very few of his get that aren't talented and easy to ride. Ditto for the "B" line, which, while almost dying out, is slowly making a come-back. They tend to be dressage specialists and bring elegance & brilliance to the table.

    But it is always better to choose the horse before the pedigree; I doubt many upper level riders put much weight on the pedigree when selecting a mount (unless they are retained by a breeder, as Lisa Wilcox was and Ed Gal is).

    There are/were plenty of upper level dressage stars who did not have any of these horses in their pedigree or if they did, they were not close up.

    And much depends on what type of rider you are and what level you are shooting for (which may well mean a horse switch at some point).

    The "R" line is known for it's high rideability and is very ammie-friendly. This trait is so well ingrained in them that I have yet to meet or even hear of a difficult "R" line horse.. I'm sure there is one out there, but....

    Oh! I just thought of one: Rembrandt!!! But, although technically he is an "R" line horse, these days when we think of "R" line, we think of horses sired by Rubinstein I or one of his sons.

    Weltmeyers are generally not suited for the timid or inexperienced rider and both Ferro & Jazz get are usually considered more of "pro" rides.

    But, again, an animal has many other horse's contributing to a pedigree than just a sire, so one is wise to never pick the pedigree over the horse.



  10. #10
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    Weltmeyers are generally not suited for the timid or inexperienced rider and both Ferro & Jazz get are usually considered more of "pro" rides.
    My mare is a Weltmeyer Granddaughter (Werbellin daughter).
    You hit the nail on the head with that description! While she's VERY smart, very affectionate...she's HOT HOT HOT. She will give you one hell of a run for your money. I now know her buttons but it took about 6 months. She'll try every trick in the book to be difficult (not dangerous). You really have to keep pressing to "win".

    The seller would not even entertain any visits from prospective buyers who weren't very experienced.She told me that I was a strong rider andgood for the mare.

    Curious to see who else finds similar with their Weltmeyer kids?
    mykidshavefourlegs.blogspot.com



  11. #11
    ponies4evur Guest

    Default

    Okay, I'm starting to get a feel for the names thanks guys!

    Can someone explain the 5 letter things with the "d"s and the "r".s What are the differences in the quality & characteristics of the horse?



  12. #12
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    I love the Weltmeyer line and have a Weltmeyer grandson, son of Werbellin.. My werbellin 6 year old is spooky but not hot, in fact he is rather lazy..very affectionate and has lots of personality but makes you work for everything.



  13. #13
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    My filly is by the stallion L'andiamo who stands at Cornell University. EASY EASY ammy temperament...natural strong topline, super talented at dressage with a big reaching trot...when she's excited on the lunge or just coming out of a canter she does a HUGE extended trot (she's only 3 and does this naturally). Spanish walks on her own when she's mad at flies....

    Her dam was herself an international showjumper...with mainly jumping lines.
    The horses in her pedigree: L'andiamo, Zeus, Andiamo, Lord, Voltaire, Furioso II

    If I could clone my mare over and over again i would have a stable full of her clones as dressage horses. I can't recommend her lines highly enough!



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyzteke View Post
    it is always better to choose the horse before the pedigree; I doubt many upper level riders put much weight on the pedigree when selecting a mount
    Exactly!!!

    You know, the horse can have the best bloodlines, but have a crappy walk, trot like a Shetland pony, and a canter much left to be desired.

    When looking at a horse, never think, oh look at his bloodlines they're great! so he must also move extremely well!

    Just because a horse's sire is great (or dam) does not mean the horse is going to be the same as the sire/dam.

    There are many horses out there without good bloodlines, but they move better than those with the good bloodlines.



  15. #15
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    while the question is about bloodlines, more important i think is the individual in front of you and who they are as an individual (and who is going to be riding them!) As an example: it doenst matter how well bred - if the horse doesn't have good ridability or if they dont want to do the job - fantastic gaits etc will do you no good.



  16. #16
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    I honestly feel as though most warmblood registries value rideability and conformation so highly that you have a pretty safe bet with good bloodlines behind the horse. I have seen very few sandro hit or Roemer offspring that are mules with ewe necks and terrible canters ;-)



  17. #17
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    yes, but not every WB from those lines will excel and many not from those lines will.

    better to look at the horse in front of you and see how you click with them and see if they will do the hard work required to train up the levels.



  18. #18
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    It's incorrect to say all registries value rideability. They value conformation and gaits but not all view rideability the same or even rate it. Dutch WBs are not put to the same tests for rideability that Hanoverians are.

    Btw, I never said or implied that breeders send their stock to slaughter. Breeders sell, others buy. Not every horse will be useable for one reason or another and those that aren't are put down or sent to slaughter. There is a well known story of a dressage driving horse that was on its way to slaughter but was purchased by a driver at the last minute and went on to become part of an olympic driving team.



  19. #19
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    If you are looking at young, unstarted horses, you have to think about their bloodlines, as well as the confirmation and temperament that you see in front of you. I have a young mare by Rosario, a Rubenstein son, out of a mare sired by a Trakehner (Happy Hour) with a good record of producing rideable horses. I specifically went looking for an R line youngster, because of the rideability. She's been under saddle a year, and I am very pleased with her as an amateur owner horse. Has talent for dressage and I can take her on the trails.



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by xrmn002 View Post
    There's a lot. I peronally like to see Donnerhall, Rubenstein or Weltmeyer up close.
    These guys for sure, and the Florestan lines too



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