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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 8, 2005
    Posts
    660

    Default Protein and/or fat

    Hi All

    Just wondering does a high level protein make a horse hot? I guess a higher level of fat does as fat equals energy. Just got a new gelding, 15.1 hand Paint, and put him on 1/2 scoop TC Senior which has 14% protein and 10% fat, since I have an older gelding on it and thought it would be good for him too! He seems kind of up. Not sure if this is him or the feed, as we just bought him "blind".

    How much protein should a gelding get? Thanks for your help!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
    Posts
    12,903

    Default

    Fat definitely should not make them "hot". It is a good source of calories both to put on weight without making them goofy, but it is also a nice source of GOOD energy. Most people now try to give a higher fat content to skinny and/or hard working horses because it gets the job done without making them wild.

    I know protein has been accused of making horses hot, but don't think it really does with MOST horses. I feed a very high protein ration balancer AND a lot of alfalfa, and my horses are not hot.

    There could be any number of reasons why this new horse is "up." What was he on before? Was he underweight? How long has he been with you (his "up" could just be jangled nerves)? TC Senior is a good feed and a lot of people feed it with great results. I would give him a little time to see if he settles before blaming the food.

    Also, it would be good to know how much that half a scoop of feed WEIGHS. Feed should always be fed by weight, not volume.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,693

    Default

    Protein does not make horse's hot. 1/2 scoop of a 14% feed is hardly anything - at most it's 1.5qt and maybe 2.25lb which gives 143gm protein out of the 700gm+ the horse needs

    The *source* of the protein can cause some sensitivity issues. Alfalfa can be the culprit, for example.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2009
    Location
    Southern Colorado
    Posts
    293

    Default

    I cut my QH mare down from a Sr feed to Omelene 100 (10% protein) and can see a difference...maybe it's just the hot weather tho!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2006
    Posts
    2,106

    Default

    I find that often it is the amount of calories that can make one hot sometimes. I know a TB that was quieter on a local sweet feed (It was basically oats molasses and small pellets) than the same amount of TC complete. Do you know if the horse was eating anything at all before?



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2006
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    1,919

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by workinggirl View Post
    Hi All

    Just wondering does a high level protein make a horse hot? I guess a higher level of fat does as fat equals energy. Just got a new gelding, 15.1 hand Paint, and put him on 1/2 scoop TC Senior which has 14% protein and 10% fat, since I have an older gelding on it and thought it would be good for him too! He seems kind of up. Not sure if this is him or the feed, as we just bought him "blind".

    How much protein should a gelding get? Thanks for your help!
    Fat would not make a horse hot, as they are considered 'cool' calories. Excellent source of additional calories for horses such as mine who are high level endurance horses.

    Protein also isn't known for making a horse hot. useful for building and maintainin muscle and so forth.

    Horses who may be susceptible to being hot due to an excess of energy in feed, generally are having a reaction to a high sugar/starch diet (ie something like sweetfeed etc)

    although horses being hot due solely to feed isn't as quite common as one would think.

    sometimes as well - horses may be sensitive to an ingredient in a processed feed (always fun trying to work that one out:/ )

    If you suspect the feed, remove it from his diet and see what the result is.- if he's an average working horses, ridden a few hoursa a week, a pure hay diet will be fine until you have to chance to see if there is a behaviour change or not.

    also, some horses are just 'go' all the time- its their personality - I have one mare who is hotter then a pistol, not matter what she's eating - it's just her.
    Quote Originally Posted by ExJumper View Post
    Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
    Posts
    36,321

    Default

    You bought him "blind" and are wondering if feed is impacting his temperament in a bad way?

    How about just taking some time to let him settle, figure out what sort of temperament he has, and go from there? "Kind of up" relative to what? Maybe the horse is just naturally that way!

    Any excess of calories MAY cause a horse to have energy to burn. IME it doesn't matter if it's grass, sweet feed, alfalfa or a designer ration--too much to eat and not enough work can make a horse a little antsy. The solution is more turnout, more work, time to settle in and not necessarily the next popular brand of feed.
    Click here before you buy.



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