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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2005
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    Florida
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    105

    Default Fertility issues under high power lines??

    I remember reading, years ago, a study published about the effects of high power lines on fertility of domestic farm animals. Does anyone remember this or know where I can find an article on this? I have "Googled" but not really come up with exactly that. Lots of articles on human cancers, etc.
    Our local Electric company is trying to put up enormous concrete posts to carry 69,000 volts of electricity ..... right IN my broodmare field, closest to my barn!! They have already unceremoniously dumped the poles in WITH my mares and foals last week, without even a "by your leave"!
    We are trying to get a restraining order, but I guess it will be a long fight.
    Any help???



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
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    11,008

    Default

    The study you refer to, if it's the one most commonly mentioned, was "cooked." The data did not support the theory and the researcher "fudged" to make it come out the way he wanted it.

    There is no credible evidence of any adverse consequences to living things from living under a power line.

    G.



  3. #3
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    Feb. 23, 2005
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    Spotsylvania, VA
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    Default

    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  4. #4
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    Feb. 8, 2005
    Location
    Florida
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    105

    Default

    Thanks, Guilherme ..... then I guess we will fight it for all the other reasons ... ,most of which factors around how darned UGLY those huge concrete poles are. We are on a dedicated "scenic highway of Florida" ......... with beautiful horse farms and majestic live oak trees. They already want to cut DOWN some of our oaks.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    46,341

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JY View Post
    I remember reading, years ago, a study published about the effects of high power lines on fertility of domestic farm animals. Does anyone remember this or know where I can find an article on this? I have "Googled" but not really come up with exactly that. Lots of articles on human cancers, etc.
    Our local Electric company is trying to put up enormous concrete posts to carry 69,000 volts of electricity ..... right IN my broodmare field, closest to my barn!! They have already unceremoniously dumped the poles in WITH my mares and foals last week, without even a "by your leave"!
    We are trying to get a restraining order, but I guess it will be a long fight.
    Any help???
    I have yet to see a private land owner get anywhere crossing swords with utility companies.
    Here, if you try to work with them, they are very nice, but you have to understand that they will go where they want, that is their right and standing by the few rights that leaves you with needs to be done sensibly.

    In all we do in life, some times, you are the one carrying the big stick, some times, you are the underdog.
    Sounds like you are the underdog there, so work with that knowledge, it will pay in the end, as you will at least retain some say so.

    When it comes to studies like that one, why try to bring stuff the electric company knows they can fight in court for years and win anyway, a mere annoyance in all they do, when to you is your whole life?

    We had an elderly neighbor that fought utility companies hard all his life, gas lines, electric lines, he didn't want them thru his land.
    He never won any case and spent years and resources on those fights.

    No one can answer if those lines will hurt your broodmares, but so much can make a mare abort or have non-viable offspring that it is hard to determine if it was living close to high voltage lines.

    The way society is organized, the lines go where they have to go, you can move the mares if you are worried about any unproven side effects of living by those lines.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2000
    Location
    NE TN, USA
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    6,223

    Default

    From the link:
    ...The few studies that have been conducted on adult exposures show no evidence of a link between residential EMF exposure and adult cancers, including leukemia, brain cancer, and breast cancer. Based on these reviews, the NIEHS recommends continued education on practical ways of reducing exposures to EMFs...
    69,000 Volts is not exactly a "residential" level.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
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    Spotsylvania, VA
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    Default Unfortunately Bluey probably nailed it

    http://www.powerlinefacts.com/FAQ.htm

    This site iw from 2002 but at the bottom mentions a CA study.
    The California EMF project is just winding up. It has now released its findings. In its evaluation, it concludes magnetic fields likely cause childhood and adult leukemia, adult brain cancer, spontaneous abortions ,and ALS. The evaluation further concludes that magnetic fields possibly cause childhood brain cancer, female and male breast cancer, Alzheimers disease, suicide, and heart problems.

    I couldn't find an actual report of the CA study however

    http://www.skepdic.com/emf.html

    [FONT=Arial]Another study, done by the University of Southern California, found increased leukemia rates in children living near power lines. According to Robert Pool,
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]The study examined 232 leukemia patients under the age of 10, and a group of control subjects that were matched for age, sex, and race. The amount of EMF exposure for each child was determined in a number of ways. No correlation was found between the incidence of leukemia and the electric field exposure as measured by spot checking. An insignificant correlation was noted between incidence of leukemia and levels of exposure to magnetic fields, as measured by a continual measurement over a 24-hour period. A significant correlation was seen between the EMF exposure, as measured by wire coding, and an increased risk of leukemia. Those with the highest level of exposure had a 2.5-fold greater risk of developing leukemia. It is not understood how these differences in correlation depend on the way the EMFs are measured. It is possible that some types of EMF exposure may lead to an increased risk of leukemia. On the other hand, measurements taken by wire coding may be more sensitive. Further study is needed to see what factors are being measured by the wire coding and not by the other methods. Until that is understood, it is not clear if exposure to high levels of EMFs is related to an increased risk of leukemia (Pool, 1991).[/SIZE][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial][/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]Hope this helps. Utility companies are very tough opponents[/SIZE][/FONT]
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2007
    Posts
    321

    Default

    I know someone in the broadcast industry. People complain about those towers and antennas but he would live in a house near them. Will not have anything to do with being near high power lines. We take that as a hint and do not even use electric blankets. Cell towers...don't like those much.

    If you get your TV and radio over the air and not on cable, you might be saying good bye to any decent reception. I'd make the electric company compensate for that by maybe relocating your antenna or paying for the cost of getting cable out there, if it can be done. I wouldn't let them test for problems, either.

    If they are putting in lines in areas that were not already designated for that possibility, you might have some leverage. There are always easements but I would think that if the power company had right of way to construct high power lines, that should have been on your title. Most normal easements, like residential lines, have to do with frontage- not slicing through a property. I would be looking at your property papers very closely. You would probably lose an eminent domain fight, but does the company have that right without doing all of their paperwork? And it might put off the construction for a long time if the company did not already have all their legal ducks in line before starting this.



  9. #9
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    Jun. 4, 2002
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    Suffolk, VA
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    Default

    Years ago when I lived in NC, our subdivision and other homeowners in the path of new power lines banded together and fought a large power company and won in a dispute over the route they wanted to put the new power line which would have gone right over all of our land and quite close to several existing homes. It would have ruined our property values and many people were concerned about health concerns also.

    What really helped was to organize with other people and make yourself a really squeaky annoying wheel with these folks. Get local newspapers and TV stations involved and have public hearings, etc... We basically were so much trouble that the power company decided to run their lines elsewhere through a less populated area.



  10. #10
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream Believer View Post
    Years ago when I lived in NC, our subdivision and other homeowners in the path of new power lines banded together and fought a large power company and won in a dispute over the route they wanted to put the new power line which would have gone right over all of our land and quite close to several existing homes. It would have ruined our property values and many people were concerned about health concerns also.

    What really helped was to organize with other people and make yourself a really squeaky annoying wheel with these folks. Get local newspapers and TV stations involved and have public hearings, etc... We basically were so much trouble that the power company decided to run their lines elsewhere through a less populated area.
    That is what you do during the studies and comment period.
    Some did that just here two years ago and the company then proposed three different ways and the state commission told them where to go.
    They are surveying now and will start building soon.

    Once the path is approved and they start construction, as it seems it is happening where this poster is, the horses got out and the barn door closed already, will be much harder to get anything done, past the comment period.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2007
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    Default

    You can fight beyond the comment period, although it gets harder to explain why you didn't lodge a comment. However, I know of one case where a company was made to post again, in a newspaper of county-wide distribution, instead of the little read local they used. You see, they didn't want anyone to know. Depends on the county and state laws. And for something this big, landowners directly affected and sometimes those nearby my be required to have received a letter directly so they had an opportunity to become involved. Depends again on the rules.

    You can also sometimes challenge the environmental impact studies- or even find out if one was done, if required.

    Then, there may be a appeals process which, if initiated, has to be completed before they begin or continue construction, if an appeal is filed. A time frame to file may be involved here.

    The OP would have to do some digging and education to find these things out. IMHO, you will not want to stop with the opinions of city/county employees, who may not really know anything.

    Then, if the project does impact property values, and that can be proven, land owners may be due compensation. The issue is in the proving of it, which could involve a lawyer because the lawyer would have to know the state laws on that and probably use previous cases to prove it. Getting into case law to see if you stand a chance will give you headaches.

    The first step would be finding out if all of the rules and regulations were followed by the company/county involved, what they were required to do, and if they did it. Each state is different and my comments above may not apply to your state.



  12. #12
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    Jun. 4, 2002
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    Suffolk, VA
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    Default

    You are right. It was during the comment period that we fought them off. I can't remember how we found out about the proposed power line but it was by accident. They were not obvious about letting us know it could run over our land and I do suspect they were hoping no one would notice until it was too late.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2007
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    321

    Default

    Daydream Believer:

    You are right. It was during the comment period that we fought them off. I can't remember how we found out about the proposed power line but it was by accident. They were not obvious about letting us know it could run over our land and I do suspect they were hoping no one would notice until it was too late.
    Again, you have to know the laws of the state on notification. If they were not followed, one might be able to force them back to square one and have a comment period again. If the power company is a business and not a state/county/city service, especially, they may have decided to skip a few steps. But you have to dig to find this, make them show they provided notification, and was it enough? I think the first thing to figure out is if the property title indicates the power company has more access than just perimeter easement. Then, for something that is cutting across private property, I would think a letter of notification would be required. But, again, different states, different rules.

    I know of one instance where notification by letter went out after posting in a small, local weekly, after any comment period and one public meeting (Which, of course, no one knew about) City and county governments won't be paying minute attention to the rules and regs. They'll get the paperwork that says it was all done and unless challenged, it will not get noticed.



  14. #14
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    In Jingle Town
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    Default

    Back to the original thought though, of the esthetics and the trees...

    I think with the exception of live oak, those trees grow back really fast.

    The power poles are not pretty, but can have their own visual interest.
    It does however pay to not be a dork and look at the maps and talk to the people:

    A couple decades back my dad was shaking his head about the final route the high voltage powerline in one area was forced to follow:
    Along the top ridge of a clear plain! When they could have put it in the valley, blending in the backdrop of the wooded slopes...(not concrete poles, but metal...kinda see through)


    Electricity is a matter of the common good (no matter how one stands in terms of the individual companies...) so I see little wiggle room there trying to fight the route on just a NIMBY argument.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



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