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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2001
    Location
    Coatesville, Pa.
    Posts
    5,461

    Wink Where to look? Young or adult dogs needing new homes? **Update. We got one!**

    Hi guys,

    We are looking into taking in another dog. The question I have is where can we look online that will help us with this search.

    We'd love a lab, over 8 months old full bred prefered but we're realistic, a close mix could be fine.

    I have looked at Craigslist, Pet Finder, Petango and Ebay Classifeds.

    What bothers me is that there seems not to be a basic site where owners can get rid of their dogs without a potential new owner having to spend in excess of $200. I get that rescues need to cover their expenses. I am a bt shocked to see fees of over $300 in some places for a mutt. I can do math and having cared for my dogs I know what vaccines and spay/neutering cost. So I am kindof wondering what those "rescues" are doing with 50+ animals at $300 a pop!


    Anyway... off the rant. Aside from Craigslist, am I missing some site online to help me look for a direct from owner dog?

    ~Emily
    Last edited by Xctrygirl; Jul. 10, 2011 at 02:02 PM.
    "Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgment that something is more important than fear. The brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all." ~2001 The Princess Diaries



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Posts
    1,265

    Default

    I got mine lab free.....just keep your eyes open. Craigslist is a good option, though thats not where my dog came from. Sometimes families place pets there they can't keep, most are free



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,391

    Default

    If you're looking for a dog direct from an owner, craigslist or the local newspaper/bulletin board at the feed store is your best bet. Or just passing the word around that you're looking for a new critter.

    Another thing to do is to look more at "pounds" vs. "shelters." The pound a couple cities away from me adopts at $5 a pop, and the dogs have a week to get out of there before being euthanized. The downside, of course, is the $5 gets you nothing but the basic dog....no shots, no spay/neuter, no history on the pet, very minimal temperment testing, no "give back" policy, etc. And you don't get a huge selection...you get what walks in off the street, which in this particular area is nothing but poor Pit Bulls.

    ANOTHER thing to look into is pulling a pup up from down south. I have brought my last two pups up from down south for a total of about $200. ($25 for the adoption fee, a little more for a health cert to cross the borders, the rest for the travel expenses) They are all pulled from pounds where dozens of dogs are euthanized on a daily basis, plenty of cute labs and lab mixes or whatever other breed you could be looking for. There are lots of groups that network to get the puppies north in big puppy trains.

    I hear you on the fees though. I am dealing with a friend of a friend with a puppy that she cannot care for/is not responsible enough to have. I gave my local no-kill shelter a call, just to inquire about surrendering the puppy to them. The guy was very enthusiastic ("Oh, gosh yes, bring him over, puppies are rare up here and disappear within a day or two!") and this shelter asks a $500 fee for puppies. But get this. In addition to the fee that they ask adoptive owners, they were looking for a $200 SURRENDER FEE! From me! After they admitted that puppies disappear in a day, and they ask $500 for them. And this guy is already fixed and has gotten his puppy shots.

    I guess the guy could hear my jaw drop, because he quickly said "I mean, it's not your dog and you're just trying to do the right thing, and your business donates to us a lot, so obviously we wouldn't require that from you..." But still! I get the $200 if you want to drop off your 15 year old blind Golden Retriever, but a wiggly 5mo puppy they admit will be gone in a day? Sheesh!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,706

    Default

    You guys realize that the building and land and electricity and phone and food and cages and sanitizer and lawn mowing, the list is endless, costs money. Right? It's not like they are taking your $200 and getting a swedish massage with it.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2003
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    5,472

    Default

    Many times shelters will reduce the fee for an "older" dog (i.e. not a young puppy). Our shelter here in Birmingham has a reduced fee for black dogs -- they are harder to get adopted -- so they actually have a special deal and a "black dog club" (Birmingham, AL Humane Society). Many Labs are black and they are quite common, so I'd check that out as well as the Jefferson County Animal Control (take in the stray/pick-ups the Humane Society won't take -- higher kill rate). Alot of shelters down here are stressed to the max since the tornadoes. Alot of animals that were displaced are still in shelters and not available since no owner has been located. I think there is quite a bit of consideration on those. The Shelby County (just S of B'ham) Humane Society organizes trips up North with a load of adoptable dogs every few months so they have an opportunity to get a home. Good Luck!
    PennyG



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2001
    Location
    Ft Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    3,889

    Default

    Maybe you'll get lucky, like I did, and have one just appear in your pasture. I'd never had a Lab (nor did I want one), but she has been THE best dog.

    It probably isn't as prevalent where you live, but the majority of the dogs around here that end up in rescues, and shelters, are heartworm positive. Mine was. Considering how expensive the treatment is, any adoption fee is probably well worth it.
    "Everyone will start to cheer, when you put on your sailin shoes"-Lowell George

    What's the status on Tuco?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,408

    Default

    Humane society? Woodford County in Kentucky is not expensive and includes all shots, neuter or spay, microchip and a free vet exam.

    We just adopted a collie from TriCounty collie rescue, their fee is only $375 for a puppy and our 1 1/2 year old was $300. That included all the above too.

    If you went to a breeder for a well bred dog you'd be paying at least $600 plus (and probably plus) and still have to pay for shots, neuter spay, the works.

    I actually think $300 is a deal.

    Or, you might be lucky. Ours just wandered by one day. Beautiful 6 month old yellow lab. But, we still had to take care of shots, neuter and microchip.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2009
    Posts
    51

    Default

    Speaking from very lengthy experience the $200 to $300 that rescues charge rarely covers the cost of the vet work they put into the dog. County shelters and the such are supported by the taxpayers. By all means, if you want to adopt straight from the shelter, please do. It will mean fewer dogs that the rescues need to try and save. What vet services and temperment testing each county shelter does varies widely.

    Craigs List dogs are a possibility - just be aware that just because someone says that are sweet and loving, doesn't make it so. Also know they may have health issues that the person can't or won't pay for and they are looking to find someone to take the dog of their hands. Sometimes good dogs are there. It's a chance you take.

    If you adopt from a reputable rescue, the dog will have been in rescue for a period of time, hopefully with a foster family so that the family can observe the dogs personality and needs to make a good lifelong match.

    If you adopt from a reputable rescue, they will always take the dog back a month or ten years down the road - they commit to making sure the dog doesn't wind up back in a county shelter.

    These are the vet services that the rescue I am affliated with provide for every dog. Spay/Neuter, complete vaccinations, tested for heartworms and internal parasites, microchipped with the first years' registration. Call your vet and ask them what it would cost you to have these services done on a 50 pound dog. I think you will find it is much cheaper to adopt through a rescue.

    We also do dentals as necessary, many times with teeth extraction. We do all necessary vet work and for those poor senior souls that are dumped after they get old, we provide lifetime foster homes and the necessary care for them, sometimes for years. If we find an adopter for a senior or special needs dog, we waive the adoption fee all together.

    Rescues are typically a group of caring people trying to do a job that is almost impossible. Most of them have little or no life of their own because of the crushing number of dogs dumped into kill shelters. They try to make perfect matches between people and dogs so that they can have a wonderful life together. That is what we live for. Most of us empty our pockets to bridge the gap between what the dogs really cost and what the rescue gets in for adoption donations and general donations.

    So please, before you fuss about that $200 to $300 donation, know how far the rescue is making it stretch and remember a "free" dog can actually be quite expensive.

    Stepping off my soapbox now...seven foster dogs to feed and medicate........



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2003
    Location
    NE FL
    Posts
    6,479

    Default

    Go to www.petfinder.com and put in zip code 32040. You will get all the dogs that are listed now by The London Sanctuary, which is the rescue that I am vp of.
    We have a female yellow lab right now, I think she is 6 months old, her name is Brooke. I am also fostering a dog for us, he is an 18 month old American Bulldog. He's been great and no problems with the horses. But if you see anything you like just let me know and I can get you in touch with who is fostering them and they can answer any questions you have about the dog.
    They all come fully vetted, chipped, etc. Our adoption fees are usually right around $100, but that money goes right back into the rescue to help more animals. All of our dogs are in foster homes for as long as it takes to get homes, we don't have an actual "shelter", so they get socialized etc while they are waiting.
    For example, one of our foster parents found a mother bassett hound and her 8 babies. So we had to vet them all, just had all the babies spayed and neutered, chipped etc and mom is next. We also found 2 puppies in a WalMart dumpster, same drill for them. So it may seem like a lot of $$ but in the grand scheme of things it's not.
    If I can help you with any of our animals just let me know.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2006
    Location
    bucks county
    Posts
    1,294

    Default

    www.animallifelineonline.org

    an amazing rescue in bucks county that goes into rural areas (started in WV now goes almost everywhere in the south) and helps them rebuild their shelters to accommodate the growing need. They always bring back dogs and puppies when they come home and they also help place animals in the area as well.

    So if you contact them and let them know what kind of pup you are looking for and what you situation at home is, they will let you know if they have anything close to it somewhere in their "railroad" if you will. I am not sure what the adoption fee is off the top of my head, but I can tell you they are way more concerned with finding solid, appropriate homes for the animals than they are about getting enough money.

    they are always looking for foster homes and adoptees for their adult dogs; my SIL started this rescue and it has flourished tremendously since it began. They have a thrift shop in a small shopping center in Warrington on 611 right past Bristol Rd heading south. All the proceeds go to the animals and help fund the rebuilding projects.

    Just another option to consider...
    "to each his own..."

    just a horse obsessed girl who finds blogging way more fun than being an adult...
    http://equinerainman274.wordpress.com/



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2007
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    1,869

    Default

    If you hear of any rescues that are clearing a decent profit (beyond making ends meet), I know some people who'd like to talk to them.

    The kennel I worked at partnered with a boxer rescue and trust me, a lot of those dogs cost the rescue a heck of a lot more than $300.

    We usually had 3-4 dogs at a time in the kennel while the rescue found foster homes, and it wasn't unusual for a dog to be there for a month or two. One month of board for a medium-sized dog cost $840.

    Let's say we're talking about a rescue that has it's own kennel and doesn't need to make a profit. So maybe cut the price in half, that's $420. Hell, let's say the kennel I was at had a giant markup and this rescue has all volunteers, so it's a third of the price of the kennel: $280. Now where's the extra money for the vet? What if the dog's sick and needs more than 'routine'?


    Quote Originally Posted by PAF View Post
    Speaking from very lengthy experience the $200 to $300 that rescues charge rarely covers the cost of the vet work they put into the dog.

    These are the vet services that the rescue I am affliated with provide for every dog. Spay/Neuter, complete vaccinations, tested for heartworms and internal parasites, microchipped with the first years' registration. Call your vet and ask them what it would cost you to have these services done on a 50 pound dog. I think you will find it is much cheaper to adopt through a rescue.

    We also do dentals as necessary, many times with teeth extraction. We do all necessary vet work and for those poor senior souls that are dumped after they get old, we provide lifetime foster homes and the necessary care for them, sometimes for years. If we find an adopter for a senior or special needs dog, we waive the adoption fee all together.

    Rescues are typically a group of caring people trying to do a job that is almost impossible. Most of them have little or no life of their own because of the crushing number of dogs dumped into kill shelters. They try to make perfect matches between people and dogs so that they can have a wonderful life together. That is what we live for. Most of us empty our pockets to bridge the gap between what the dogs really cost and what the rescue gets in for adoption donations and general donations.

    So please, before you fuss about that $200 to $300 donation, know how far the rescue is making it stretch and remember a "free" dog can actually be quite expensive.

    Stepping off my soapbox now...seven foster dogs to feed and medicate........
    "Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out." ~John Wooden

    Phoenix Animal Rescue



  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    You guys realize that the building and land and electricity and phone and food and cages and sanitizer and lawn mowing, the list is endless, costs money. Right? It's not like they are taking your $200 and getting a swedish massage with it.
    Yep, people forget to figure in all the associated costs.

    Quote Originally Posted by PAF View Post
    Speaking from very lengthy experience the $200 to $300 that rescues charge rarely covers the cost of the vet work they put into the dog. County shelters and the such are supported by the taxpayers. By all means, if you want to adopt straight from the shelter, please do. It will mean fewer dogs that the rescues need to try and save. What vet services and temperment testing each county shelter does varies widely.

    Craigs List dogs are a possibility - just be aware that just because someone says that are sweet and loving, doesn't make it so. Also know they may have health issues that the person can't or won't pay for and they are looking to find someone to take the dog of their hands. Sometimes good dogs are there. It's a chance you take.

    If you adopt from a reputable rescue, the dog will have been in rescue for a period of time, hopefully with a foster family so that the family can observe the dogs personality and needs to make a good lifelong match.

    If you adopt from a reputable rescue, they will always take the dog back a month or ten years down the road - they commit to making sure the dog doesn't wind up back in a county shelter.

    These are the vet services that the rescue I am affliated with provide for every dog. Spay/Neuter, complete vaccinations, tested for heartworms and internal parasites, microchipped with the first years' registration. Call your vet and ask them what it would cost you to have these services done on a 50 pound dog. I think you will find it is much cheaper to adopt through a rescue.

    We also do dentals as necessary, many times with teeth extraction. We do all necessary vet work and for those poor senior souls that are dumped after they get old, we provide lifetime foster homes and the necessary care for them, sometimes for years. If we find an adopter for a senior or special needs dog, we waive the adoption fee all together.

    Rescues are typically a group of caring people trying to do a job that is almost impossible. Most of them have little or no life of their own because of the crushing number of dogs dumped into kill shelters. They try to make perfect matches between people and dogs so that they can have a wonderful life together. That is what we live for. Most of us empty our pockets to bridge the gap between what the dogs really cost and what the rescue gets in for adoption donations and general donations.

    So please, before you fuss about that $200 to $300 donation, know how far the rescue is making it stretch and remember a "free" dog can actually be quite expensive.

    Stepping off my soapbox now...seven foster dogs to feed and medicate........

    Well said PAF!!!

    Vet fees vary WIDELY around the country. True, the shelter or a rescue *may* get reduced fees, but it still adds up. I took a dog to the vet last week, so for comparison purposes, the office visit was $86, the heartworm test was $65, and a fecal test for worms was $32. So $183 for just those three things, no vaccines, no treatment costs included. Maybe it's cheaper in your area.

    Also, as far as adoption fees go, yes, pups tend to be adopted out very quickly, BUT, *balance that* against the five-year-old that takes months to place, or against the dog that needs significant medical treatment to become adoptable. Some rescues simply can not take on a dog that needs expensive medical care and have to euthanize because funds are not available. So, should the five-year-old that's been in rescue for six months and had substantial medical care have an adoption fee of, say, $600 to cover his costs, while a puppy that gets adopted in a week with no medical care have an adoption fee of, say, $25? Think the rescue would be able to exist long on that policy? There isn't a very wide pool of people who are willing to take on a five-year-old in the first place, and asking for actual costs for that particular dog to be covered would probably discourage many of them from adopting him.

    Generally, fees are *averaged* out across ALL adopted dogs and the rescues *still* tend to run on a deficit if you look only at adoption fees, which is why they need to do fund-raising and get donations to survive.
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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2001
    Location
    va
    Posts
    1,000

    Default

    Unless a rescue has a seriously rich benefactor(s), an adoption fee is a must. Taxes, building upkeep, insurance, utilities......, and that doesn't even touch on the costs incurred to actually take care of the animals. Get involved with a rescue group and you'll see things a bit differently.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2008
    Posts
    1,418

    Default

    The tornado surviving dogs from Joplin, MO are up for adoption. I've had several classmates adopt dogs from there in the last week. They really have done great work down there saving those animals and are very deserving of your adoption fee to continue the rescue effort. They've adopted dogs out all across the country and I'm sure could get a dog to you!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2008
    Location
    Outside Ocala FL - Horse Capital of the World
    Posts
    6,190

    Default

    Want to take a trip to FL? We have several in our pound right now, adoption fee is $40.00

    http://www.petharbor.com/pet.asp?uaid=MRON.A018877

    http://www.petharbor.com/pet.asp?uaid=MRON.A025642

    http://www.petharbor.com/pet.asp?uaid=MRON.A039801

    http://www.petharbor.com/pet.asp?uaid=MRON.A044700

    If you go to www.petharbor.com, you can put in your zip code, and it brings up a page with links of all the shelters (including the local pounds) in your area.
    There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2008
    Posts
    2,794

    Default

    You could contact your local AKC Lab club, or bird dog hunting groups. Breeders are sometimes interested in re-homing young dogs who haven't panned out as show or hunting dogs.

    Re: the adoption fee issue, I have no problem paying a reasonable price for health care, a rescue or shelter's time/expertise in pre-sorting aggression issues, and that sort of thing. I think most people feel that is sensible; you pay upfront or you take more risks and pay the vet on the way home. What bothers me is when there's an elevated fee for a purebred or a puppy. It's troubling when rescues, which after all exist purely on the basis of morality does a 360 and calculates an animal's worth as if they were running a pet store and that 3-month-old Cockapoo was worth an extra $300 compared to the 6-year-old beagle mix.

    It's also troubling because there's an element of irresponsibility implied; is the $400 home better or even as good as the $150 home? Are they truly finding good placements in these situations? On the other hand, I also wonder about the 'sale' schemes, where a shelter will run a special on cats during kitten season, or older dogs, or large black dogs - whatever they're having a hard time 'moving.' It always strikes the media as a cute idea, but is it really a good idea?



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2003
    Location
    AridZona
    Posts
    2,874

    Default

    One other option could be freecycle. Some allow pets posts; some don't.

    http://www.freecycle.org/
    Delicious strawberry flavored death!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2001
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    4,367

    Default

    I wanted a Doberman cross puppy. I get my dogs off the side of the road, usually.
    I searched for a couple of months and found one through Craigslist. A shelter 200 miles from here does a great job getting pictures out of their animals. I was able to get a 6 week old puppy, she is a good dog.
    On the other hand, KITTENS are really fun, and I just happen to have 8 that I rescued. They would make up one nice lab......



  19. #19
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2005
    Location
    Elmwood, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,371

    Default

    Another route to find a nice dog is area veterinary techs.
    The vets are often too busy or don't wish to get involved
    in placing animals, but where I live it seems the vet techs
    all know about the family that needs to place their dog
    or the lady who does private rescue. Cost for these
    dogs is very minimal, anything from free to well under
    $100 if there have been vet bills.
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    8,339

    Default

    You can also try the bulletin boards at the vet clinic also. Especially in Military communities, or academic areas there are many people that are moving on post and have a limit on the number of animals (this is now standard at every post in the U.S.), and people graduating from grad school might be moving somewhere that is higher cost, and is hard to find a suitable apartment or housing for a pet. Don't overlook the dogs that are adults, since they could very well be totally house trained, have a known history, and be a perfect fit for you.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



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