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  1. #1
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    Mar. 22, 2011
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    Default Sitting Trot- Advice

    I have a young DWB filly who has the bouncy-est, (if that is even a word), trot! I am not talking a bit bouncy..... more like being launched.

    I typically ride hunter/jumper but due to my fillies age, we are focusing on dressage.

    I know in the lower levels you can do rising trot .... but how do you sit your bouncy horses?

    I have never had problems until now...



  2. #2
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    Apr. 22, 2011
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    I had to learn to sit the trot, on the horse on the lunge line, no stirrups or reins. once I had learned to do that, I could have the stirrups. then get used to sitting trot with stirrups, and then I got the reins back. I think that that is the best way to learn to sit the trot. also, go a little slower in the trot when you are in the arena. get used to it, and use your stomach muscles to keep you in balance and place in the saddle. then once you can sit her slow trot, go a little faster and get used to the new pace /rhythm. then keep increasing the speed until you are at a normal working trot.



  3. #3
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    Mar. 25, 2011
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    My equitation trainer says to think of playing ball with the energy of her trot. She sends it to you, you capture it and send it back. The visual works for me because then the trot feels more elastic and eliptical than hard and vertical. My dressage trainer says to pretend you are a boy and have junk up front that you don't want to crush so sit back!

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  4. #4
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    Apr. 13, 2008
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    109

    Default

    I think of the trot in terms of pistons and cams, meaning the hind legs act as pistons (energy in up/down) driving the cams (front legs/shoulders) forward. Your core (stomach) needs to be strong, and the lower back loose to allows your hips/seat to follow in a down-forward-up pattern/rythym of the horses movement.



  5. #5
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    May. 6, 2009
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    Default

    There was a thread on this topic not long ago.

    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...tting+the+trot
    2012 goal: learn to ride like a Barn Rat

    A helmet saved my life.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2004
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    Default

    Also make sure that your horse is ready to support the rider at the sitting trot. The horse has to be over her back and give you a place to sit, if she is not strong enough yet, better to post until she is ready.



  7. #7
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    Apr. 22, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by young21 View Post
    Also make sure that your horse is ready to support the rider at the sitting trot. The horse has to be over her back and give you a place to sit, if she is not strong enough yet, better to post until she is ready.
    yes, this is extremely important!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2006
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    Gotham City
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    My equitation trainer says to think of playing ball with the energy of her trot. She sends it to you, you capture it and send it back. The visual works for me because then the trot feels more elastic and eliptical than hard and vertical. My dressage trainer says to pretend you are a boy and have junk up front that you don't want to crush so sit back!

    Paula
    Junk up front? I couldn't have said it better myself! Yes, do NOT arch your back! I find that if I feel I'm "slumping in the saddle" like a B&W movie cowboy, I'm getting there.... And, yes, my trainer is a guy.
    "Go on, Bill — this is no place for a pony."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Northeast
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    10,181

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by young21 View Post
    Also make sure that your horse is ready to support the rider at the sitting trot. The horse has to be over her back and give you a place to sit, if she is not strong enough yet, better to post until she is ready.
    There you go!

    If she is young, she may not have developed the ability to balance and carry you and her when you sit. So she may not be reaching under herself and using her back. Don't sit, rise! Then as she gets stronger sit for only short periods, one or two strides at first, and then progress from there.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  10. #10
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    Mar. 22, 2011
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by InWhyCee Redux View Post
    Junk up front? I couldn't have said it better myself! Yes, do NOT arch your back! I find that if I feel I'm "slumping in the saddle" like a B&W movie cowboy, I'm getting there.... And, yes, my trainer is a guy.

    HAHA... this is awesome! I am going to try a few of these things throughout the next week. I try not to sit often with her since I want to stay off her back at this age, but I'll attempt a few steps here and there.

    Thank you everyone! I did find myself thinking... no bounce, relax... but it didn't help lol.



  11. #11
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    Jun. 6, 2005
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    Default

    I would really be aware of her back as others have said. My young WB gets especially bouncy when in the midst of growth spurts.



  12. #12
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    Mar. 25, 2011
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    Pennsylvania
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    Default

    Here's more; I'm a pretty busty wench so if I can catch a glimpse of the girls in my lower field of vision when I post I'm sitting back properly. If they don't appear in my lower field of vision I'm leaning forward.

    OP don't worry. So many of us came from a hunter tradition with that half cocked forward hollow back position to fix. And not to mention LOUD aids.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  13. #13
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    Oct. 10, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by pryme_thyme View Post
    HAHA... this is awesome! I am going to try a few of these things throughout the next week. I try not to sit often with her since I want to stay off her back at this age, but I'll attempt a few steps here and there.

    Thank you everyone! I did find myself thinking... no bounce, relax... but it didn't help lol.
    I don't know if you've ever done yoga, but if you have, think Rock Pose. You're probably already aware that you have seat bones, but there are front seat bones and back seat bones -- and for the sitting trot, it helps to think back! Good luck!

    PS: Full disclosure: I'm a newbie to this Forum, but I started off Western, so there you go....
    "Go on, Bill — this is no place for a pony."



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