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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2008
    Posts
    1,461

    Default Hay Testing in the Mid-Atlantic

    I'm interested in getting some hay tested and was looking for recommendations of labs to send it to. Also, about how much should it cost? I am in Maryland.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2008
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    I just saw another thread on hay testing that recommended Equi-Analytical Labs, so I looked at their website which seems pretty user friendly.

    I noticed that they recommend a hay probe, which they sell for $120. Are there cheaper alternatives?

    I am just a boarder, not the BO, but am concerned about the quality of some late 1st cutting that they just got in but cannot convince the BO of the merits of testing. So I am on my own and would like to make this as economical as possible.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2007
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    1,283

    Default

    I have used Equi-Analytical for the last two years.

    I did just buy the hay probe from them (which is a good one).

    When you buy the probe from them, they also give you one free standard hay test.

    All I will have to do is money to cover cost for whatever is not covered in the standard test.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Posts
    4,242

    Default

    I use a push type probe from Sierra, it cost about $55 including shipping iirc, that was a few years ago. Here is a list of companies that sell probes.

    http://www.foragetesting.org/index.php?page=hay_probes

    Sierra has a website, http://www.sierratestingservice.com/sampling.html, but its very poor and hasn't been updated in years, and doesn't show the probe they have for sale. I had to call and order, but it arrived within 2 days.

    I have heard that some extension offices will loan you a hay probe, but I'm not sure about that.

    I'm sure a drill type probe is a lot easier, but my push probe is fine enough for as little as I use it. I duct tape a large ziplock back over the end to collect the sample. Takes some muscle to probe 15 bales, it does get tiring, but takes less than 10 minutes so its not exactly agony. Its very easy to use, sturdy, and seems to have stayed nicely sharp. I've had mine about 3 or 4 years now, I generally sample about 3-5 loads per year.

    I use EA as well, very fast, very friendly.
    “Let today be the day you stop being haunted by the ghosts from your past. What happened in the past is just one chapter in your story; don’t close the book, just turn the page.”



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2010
    Location
    Bucks County, PA
    Posts
    1,700

    Default

    A rep from Cargill came to my farm and did it for free



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2007
    Location
    Rising Sun, MD
    Posts
    4,758

    Default

    Where in MD are you? Powl's Feed will do it for it you if you take them a sample they are right over the MD/ PA line
    I'm good at being uncomfortable so I can't stop changing all the time -Fiona Apple, Extraordinary Machine
    If I were your appendages, I'd hold open your eyes so you would see- Incubus



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2002
    Location
    The horse country of VA
    Posts
    3,435

    Default

    I use Equi-Analytical, and they've been super:
    http://www.equi-analytical.com/

    Every spring, I just borrow the hay probe from my local ag extension office to pull my core samples. I get my results back within a couple days.
    Equus Keepus Brokus



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2002
    Location
    The horse country of VA
    Posts
    3,435

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tabula rashah View Post
    Where in MD are you? Powl's Feed will do it for it you if you take them a sample they are right over the MD/ PA line
    My local Southern States co-op will also pull samples for customers, but in order to get an accurate sample for testing, core samples should be taken from 12-15 bales (assuming they're all from the same crop). That means loading up the truck and hauling them over to the co-op.

    If one has a local ag extension office, chances are they may have a hay probe to loan out. Mine does, and it never costs a thing except for me writing my name and ph. # on a piece of paper.
    Equus Keepus Brokus



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